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Small-scale biomass fueled cogeneration systems - A guidebook for general audiences

Description: What is cogeneration and how does it reduce costs? Cogeneration is the production of power -- and useful heat -- from the same fuel. In a typical biomass-fueled cogeneration plant, a steam turbine drives a generator, producing electricity. The plant uses steam from the turbine for heating, drying, or other uses. The benefits of cogeneration can mostly easily be seen through actual samples. For example, cogeneration fits well with the operation of sawmills. Sawmills can produce more steam from their waste wood than they need for drying lumber. Wood waste is a disposal problem unless the sawmill converts it to energy. The case studies in Section 8 illustrate some pluses and minuses of cogeneration. The electricity from the cogeneration plant can do more than meet the in-house requirements of the mill or manufacturing plant. PURPA -- the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 -- allows a cogenerator to sell power to a utility and make money on the excess power it produces. It requires the utility to buy the power at a fair price -- the utility`s {open_quotes}avoided cost.{close_quotes} This can help make operation of a cogeneration plant practical.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Wiltsee, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear data needs for accelerator-driven transmutation systems

Description: The possibilities of several new technologies based on use of intense, medium-energy proton accelerators are being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The potential new areas include destruction of long-lived components of nuclear waste, plutonium burning, energy production, and production of tritium. The design, assessment, and safety analysis of potential facilities involves the understanding of complex combinations of nuclear processes, which in turn places new requirements on nuclear data that transcend the traditional needs of the fission and fusion reactor communities. In this paper an assessment of the nuclear data needs for systems currently being considered in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies program is given.
Date: July 1, 1994
Creator: Arthur, E. D.; Wilson, W. B. & Young, P. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Implementation plan for operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station cogeneration facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California

Description: The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide. The SouthWestern Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, in cooperation with FEMP, has tasked PNL with developing a plan for implementing recommended modifications to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) cogeneration plant at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) in San Diego. That plan is detailed in this report.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Carroll, D. M.; Parker, S. A. & Stucky, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

Description: This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S. & Williams, H. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Cogeneration Facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California

Description: The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwestern Division commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to determine the most cost-effective approach to the operation of the cogeneration facility in the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI). Nineteen alternative scenarios were analyzed by PNL on a life-cycle cost basis to determine whether to continue operating the cogeneration facility or convert the plant to emergency-generator status. This report provides the results of the analysis performed by PNL for the 19 alternative scenarios. A narrative description of each scenario is provided, including information on the prime mover, electrical generating efficiency, thermal recovery efficiency, operational labor, and backup energy strategy. Descriptions of the energy and energy cost analysis, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, emissions and related costs, and implementation costs are also provided for each alternative. A summary table presents the operational cost of each scenario and presents the result of the life-cycle cost analysis.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Parker, S. A.; Carroll, D. M.; McMordie, K. L.; Brown, D. R.; Daellenbach, K. K.; Shankle, S. A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scenarios for multi-unit inertial fusion energy plants producing hydrogen fuel

Description: This work describes: (a) the motivation for considering fusion in general, and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) in particular, to produce hydrogen fuel powering low-emission vehicles; (b) the general requirements for any fusion electric plant to produce hydrogen by water electrolysis at costs competitive with present consumer gasoline fuel costs per passenger mile, for advanced car architectures meeting President Clinton`s 80 mpg advanced car goal, and (c) a comparative economic analysis for the potential cost of electricity (CoE) and corresponding cost of hydrogen (CoH) from a variety of multi-unit IFE plants with one to eight target chambers sharing a common driver and target fab facility. Cases with either heavy-ion or diode-pumped, solid-state laser drivers are considered, with ``conventional`` indirect drive target gains versus ``advanced, e.g. Fast Ignitor`` direct drive gain assumptions, and with conventional steam balance-of-plant (BoP) versus advanced MHD plus steam combined cycle BoP, to contrast the potential economics under ``conventional`` and ``advanced`` IFE assumptions, respectively.
Date: December 1, 1993
Creator: Logan, B. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SYNCHEM feasibility report: Phase 1

Description: Several Czech and US companies have entered into a development agreement for the purposes of determining the technical and economic feasibility and overall financeability of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) regional energy facility to be located adjacent to the Chemopetrol refinery in Litvinov, Czech Republic. The Project would use a feedstock comprised of coal supplied by Doly a upravny Komorany s.p. (DUK) coal mining company and mined from the Most/Litvinov area together with high sulfur residual oils from the Chemopetrol refinery. When gasified together with oxygen from an Air Products air separation plant, and based on an average yearly consumption of 2,100K metric tons per year of coal (as delivered) and 630K tonnes per year of oil, approximately 11 million normal cubic meters per day of syngas will be produced. At its current projected design capacity, when combusted in two General Electric advanced technology Frame 9FA gas turbines, the Project will produce approximately 690MW of electric power; 250 metric tons/hour of steam for process; and 135 thermal equivalent MW of district heat. The Feasibility Phase efforts described in this report indicate the real possibility for a successful and profitable IGCC Project for the Czech Republic. It is therefore incumbent upon all the Project Participants to review and evaluate the information contained herein such that a go/no-go decision can be reached by early next year.
Date: January 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diesel cogeneration plant using oxygen enriched air and emulsified fuels

Description: The investigation of oxygen-enriched combustion of alternative fuels in diesel engines at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is based on information gathered from two previous Department of Energy programs. The first was the slow-speed diesel engine program which used fuels such as coal-water slurry and coal derived liquid fuels in a slow speed diesel engine. The second was the development of membrane oxygen separation equipment. The results of these programs indicated that using the new membrane oxygen enrichment technology with medium- and high-speed diesel engines would do two things. First, oxygen enrichment could reduce some emissions from stationary diesel engines, particularly smoke, particulates and hydrocarbons while significantly increasing power output. The second, was that it might be possible to use less expensive liquid fuels such as No. 4, No. 6 and residual oil emulsified with water in medium- to high-speed diesel engines. The water would (1) help to eliminate the undesirable increase in nitrogen oxide production when enriched oxygen is used, and (2) by reducing the viscosity of the heavier liquid fuels, make them easier to use in smaller industrial cogeneration applications. This program consists of four steps: preliminary feasibility study, exploratory experiments, system development, and demonstration and commercialization of an industrial cogeneration system. 3 refs., 13 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Marciniak, T.J.; Cole, R.L.; Sekar, R.R.; Stodolsky, F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)) & Eustis, J.N. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final stage 2 report. Outline specifications of cogeneration plant

Description: Specifications are presented for major components of the dual-purpose power plant to be located on the University of Minnesota campus. This power plant will supply steam and electric power to a proposed grid-connected Integrated Community Energy System. The capital costs and capital budget for the power plant and specifications for auxiliary equipment, such as the interconnecting heat tunnel, are included. (LCL)
Date: March 22, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final stage 2 report. Finance plan, capital costs and institutional analysis

Description: The development of a grid-connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) is described. This system will supply electric power to the Northern States Power Co. in Minnesota and steam for the University of Minnesota, Augsburg College, two Minneapolis hospitals, and the Dept. of Health building. The fossil-fuel power plant would be located on the University of Minnesota campus. The costs, financing, and legal agreements involved in this project are presented and discussed. (LCL)
Date: March 22, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final state 2 report. Cost benefit analysis, operating costs and computer simulation

Description: A grid-connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) with a coal-burning power plant located on the University of Minnesota campus is planned. The cost benefit analysis performed for this ICES, the cost accounting methods used, and a computer simulation of the operation of the power plant are described. (LCL)
Date: March 22, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grid connected integrated community energy system. Phase II: final stage 2 report. Outline specifications of cogeneration plant; continued

Description: Specifications are presented for the electrical equipment, site preparation, building construction and mechanical systems for a dual-purpose power plant to be located on the University of Minnesota campus. This power plant will supply steam and electrical power to a grid-connected Integrated Community Energy System. (LCL)
Date: March 22, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 2. Conceptual balance of plant design

Description: This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. This volume describes the conceptual balance-of-plant (BOP) design and was prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The major emphasis of the BOP study was a preliminary design of an overall plant to provide a basis for future studies.
Date: November 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study: comparison of coal- and nuclear-fueled alternatives for process steam and by product electrical power generation for the E. I. Du Pont de Nemours and Company, Incorporated Plant Site, Victoria, Texas

Description: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of a small, (365 MWt) nuclear reactor for supplying process steam and electricity as a replacement for energy sources using increasingly scarce natural gas or oil. The Du Pont Chemical Plant Site at Victoria, Texas, was chosen as representative of industrial installations that require sizeable amounts of process steam and electricity. For comparison purposes conventional coal-fired boilers were also evaluated. It was determined that both nuclear- and coal-based process energy supply systems are technically feasible. For the specific steam/electricity demands at the reference site, the coal-fired plant proved to be economically more attractive than the nuclear units. For an application requiring a base-loaded supply of saturated steam, utilizing full reactor capacity, the nuclear option appears competitive for coal costing $37/ton in 1978 dollars.
Date: July 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study: comparison of coal- and nuclear-fueled alternatives for process steam and by product electrical power generation for the PPG Industries, Incorporated Plant Site, Lake Charles, Louisiana

Description: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of a small, (365 MWt) nuclear reactor for supplying process steam and electricity as a replacement for energy sources using increasingly scarce natural gas or oil. The PPG Industries, Incorporated Plant Site at Lake Charles, Louisiana, was chosen as representative of industrial installations that require sizeable amounts of process steam and electricity. For comparison purposes conventional coal-fired boilers were also evaluated. It was determined that both nuclear- and coal-based process energy supply systems are technically feasible. For the specific steam/electricity demands at the reference site, the coal-fired plant proved to be economically more attractive than the nuclear units. For an application requiring a base-loaded supply of saturated steam, utilizing full reactor capacity, the nuclear option appears competitive for coal costing $40/ton in 1978 dollars.
Date: July 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential benefits of thermal energy storage in the proposed Twin Cities district heating-cogeneration system. Final report

Description: A new, large, cogeneration-district heating system has been proposed for the Twin Cities area, using hot water in a closed-loop system. The proposed system, as described by Studsvik Energiteknik AB of Sweden, does not employ thermal energy storage (TES). Four cases have been developed, describing system configurations which would employ TES, to evaluate the potential benefits of incorporating annual-cycle TES into the Twin Cities system. The potential benefits are found to be substantial, confirming results of earlier, generic studies of aquifer TES. The reference (Studsvik) system employs oil-fired boilers to supplement cogenerated heat, for handling peak loads and providing standby reserve. TES can serve the same function, with net energy savings in spite of heat losses during storage, by making it possible to operate the cogeneration equipment at higher capacity factors. Coal replaces oil as the fuel consumed. Energy savings of the reference system are impressive; energy savings with TES are 2 to 22% better. Capital cost requirements for boilers, cogeneration equipment, and pipelines are reduced by $66 to $258 million. The breakeven capital cost of TES is estimated to range from $43 to $76 per kilowatt peak thermal input to or withdrawal from aquifer TES. A factor in evaluating the breakeven operating cost of TES is the $14 to $31 million per year saving in cost of fuel. Abatement of air pollution and thermal pollution are concomitant benefits.
Date: October 1, 1979
Creator: Meyer, C.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test case for the potential application of district energy systems using thermal energy cogenerated at existing electric power plants

Description: District Energy Systems (DES) for providing heating and cooling to Washington, D.C., by utilizing co-generated electrical and thermal energy from existing power plants are examined. The results of two different but related studies are compared. The more conservative of the two studies is given greatest attention. In this study, Washington is divided into four different DES service areas. These service areas are compared to one another for relative DES economic viability. The DES economics and efficiency is also compared to (1) electricity from coal, (2) oil from liquefied coal, and (3) utility gas from coal. Results of this study indicate that DESs for heating are the most efficient of the four supply options. Both studies conclude that the heating costs of DESs are less than heating with electricity when electricity is generated exclusively for heating purposes. The cost comparisons with other heating alternatives are inconclusive but they do indicate that heating by DES may be the most economical in some urban locations.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Santini, D J & Davis, A A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 3. Appendix A. Equipment list

Description: This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. Volume 1 reports the overall plant and reactor system and was prepared by the General Electric Company. Core scoping studies were performed which evaluated the effects of annular and cylindrical core configurations, radial blanket zones, burnup, and ball heavy metal loadings. The reactor system, including the PCRV, was investigated for both the annular and cylindrical core configurations. Volume 3 is an Appendix containing the equipment list for the plant and was also prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. It tabulates the major components of the plant and describes each in terms of quantity, type, orientation, etc., to provide a basis for cost estimation.
Date: November 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas-cooled reactor commercialization study: introduction scenario and commercialization analyses for process heat applications. Final report, July 8, 1977--November 30, 1977

Description: This report identifies and presents an introduction scenario which can lead to the operation of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor demonstration plants for combined process heat and electric power generation applications, and presents a commercialization analysis relevant to the organizational and management plans which could implement a development program.
Date: December 1, 1977
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conceptual design report of a refuse-fired steam plant

Description: This is a conceptual design report for the installation of a refuse-fired boiler to produce steam. The refuse, mostly paper waste, would come from two adjacent facilities, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The new steam plant, to be located at SNLL, would produce close to 100% of the steam requirements at SNLL. Unfortunately it does not have an attractive payback.
Date: August 1, 1982
Creator: Bedinger, L. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Source Book for Planning Nuclear Dual-Purpose Electric/Distillation Desalination Plants

Description: A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Reed, S. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar Total Energy Project final test report

Description: The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O. & Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Program plan for molten carbonate fuel-cell systems development

Description: The purpose of this document is to describe in both programmatic and technical terms the methodology that the US Department of Energy will use to commercialize a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. Responsibility for the planning and management of the program resides in the molten carbonate fuel cell program office at the Argonne National Laboratory which reports to the Assistant Director for Fuel Cells in the Division of Fossil Fuel utilization of DOE/FE. The actual development of technology is carried out by selected contractors. The technology development phase of the program will culminate with the construction and operation of two demonstration power plants. The first power plant will be an industrial cogeneration plant which will be completed in 1987. The other power plant will be a baseload electric power plant to be completed in 1989.
Date: October 27, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department