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The Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) Test Scores as Predictors of Academic Success of First-Year Clarendon College Students

Description: The problem in this study was to determine the relationship between the scores on the three parts (reading, writing, and mathematics) of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills Test (TAAS) and the academic success of first-year students at Clarendon College, Clarendon, Texas. High school grade-point average and gender were also included in the study. The purpose of the study was to develop an equation to predict first-year college grade-point average at Clarendon College . The predictor variables were the three parts of the TAAS Test (reading, writing, and mathematics) , high school grade-point average, and gender. The equation was developed through multiple correlation/multiple regression multivariate procedures. All statistical analyses were calculated through sub-programs of the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). The study was limited to using only 1992/1993 Texas high school graduates who had entered Clarendon College in the fall semesters of 1992 and 1993 directly following high school graduation. A search of Clarendon College records produced 115 students from these groups who fully met all standards defined for the study. Two predictor equations were developed. One developed through a simple regression command included all five predictor variables. The second equation was produced through a stepwise procedure. This equation included only high school grade-point average and the mathematics score from the TAAS Test. The variables TAAS reading, TAAS writing, and gender were not found to be significant when used in conjunction with the other predictor variables. The strength of each predictor variable was evaluated using students from the freshman class of 1994-95 at Clarendon College. Each of these students met the same basic standards used to establish the prediction equations. The two prediction equations were found to be equal in predictive strength. There was less than one percent difference in the variance accounted for between the two equations. ...
Date: August 1996
Creator: Anglin, James William
Partner: UNT Libraries