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The Transcriptions and Editions of Luigi Silva and Their Influence on Cello Pedagogy and Performance with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bach, Beethoven, Barber, Bridge, Haydn and Others

Description: Virtually disregarded in contemporary discussions of cello performance and pedagogy is the name of Luigi Silva (1903-1961). Though he did not achieve fame as a performer to the same degree as his peers Leonard Rose (1918-1984), Emanuel Feuermann (1902-1942) or Gregor Piatigorsky (1903-1976), Silva had an internationally-acclaimed performing career. Owing to his formidable technique on the instrument, he was known as the "Paganini of the cello." Through Silva's unparalleled ability to analyze technical problems in his students' playing and assist his student have populated faculties of most of the major American post-secondary schools of music and many of the principal chairs in important symphony orchestras. Of even longer-lasting significance is his enormous contribution to the literature for cello of over 100 transcriptions and scholarly editions of standard cello repertoire. By combining his own incredible artistry on the instrument and his extraordinary enthusiasm for teaching with his transcriptions of such works as the 24 Paganini Caprices, Silva helped raise the standard of cello technique to an unprecedented level and has impacted in one way or another every cellist in the twentieth century. This dissertation document describes the influences Silva's transcriptions and editions have had on cello playing and teaching in the 20th-Century.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Young, Philip T
Partner: UNT Libraries

Cadential Syntax and Mode in the Sixteenth-Century Motet: a Theory of Compositional Process and Structure from Gallus Dressler's Praecepta Musicae Poeticae

Description: Though cadences have long been recognized as an aspect of modality, Gallus Dressler's treatise Praecepta musicae poeticae (1563) offers a new understanding of their relationship to mode and structure. Dressler's comments suggest that the cadences in the exordium and at articulations of the text are "principal" to the mode, shaping the tonal structure of the work. First, it is necessary to determine which cadences indicate which modes. A survey of sixteenth-century theorists uncovered a striking difference between Pietro Aron and his followers and many lesser-known theorists, including Dressier. The latter held that the repercussae of each mode were "principal cadences," contrary to Aron's expansive lists. Dressler's syntactical theory of cadence usage was tested by examining seventeen motets by Dressler and seventy-two motets by various early sixteenth-century composers. In approximately three-fourths of the motets in each group, cadences appeared on only two different pitches (with only infrequent exceptions) in their exordia and at text articulations. These pairs are the principal cadences of Dressler's list, and identify the mode of the motets. Observations and conclusions are offered regarding the ambiguities of individual modes, and the cadence-tone usage of individual composers.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Hamrick, David (David Russell)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Wanderer

Description: The Wanderer is an orchestra piece 18'42" in duration. The purpose of this project is to provide the composer an opportunity to express through music his experience with God, rebellion, and returning as the wanderering son did in the Bible's parable.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Wu, Dien-Foon
Partner: UNT Libraries

Harmony and Structure in Richard Strauss's Macbeth

Description: This study begins with a discussion of step theory. Included in this discussion is the basis of chord succession, the idea of fundamental representation, and the uses of reinterpretation technique. These concepts are then used to demonstrate the continuity and logic of the harmonic language found in Strauss's Macbeth.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Bills, Danny C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Form and tonality as elements of neoclassical style in two works by Jean Francaix: Divertimento pour flute et piano (1955) and Suite pour flute seule (1963) with three recitals of selected works of Mozart, Widor, Feld, Muczynski and others

Description: The music of Jean Francaix is well known to those familiar with woodwind chamber literature. His long, successful career began in the 1930s when French composers rejected the excessively chromatic harmonies, intense emotionalism and grandiose proportions of late Romantic music. Embracing the concepts of neoclassicism, economy of means, clarity and objectivity, and a return to diatonicism and formal structures, the new "Classical" music contained the added spice of twentieth-century harmonic techniques including bitonality, modality, and quartal and quintal harmonies. Francaix has written many concertos and solos for woodwind instruments, but his enduring popularity resides in his chamber music for various combinations. His publisher for the last six decades has been B. Schott's Sohne who commissioned Francaix to write several chamber works in honor of his eightieth birthday. Two of his works for flute, Divertimento pour flute et piano and Suite pour flute seule, are known to professional flutists but not considered standards in the flute repertoire. The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the wide variety of Francaix's repertoire which is eminently suitable for concert and recital programming. The identification of formal and tonal elements in Francaix's two works for flute helps to place his prodigious output within the context of the prevailing musical and philosophical aesthetic in France of the 1920s through 1940s. An annotated list of Francaix's works with flute in a primary role is included as an appendix.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Ruppe, Elizabeth Ambler
Partner: UNT Libraries

Selected Structural Elements and Aspects of Performance in Bagatelles (1971) and Konstellationen (1972) by Krystyna Moszumanska-Nazar, with Three Recitals of Works by Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Liszt, Messiaen, Prokofieff, and Schumann

Description: This dissertation primarily concerns selected structural elements in Bagatelles and Konstellationen. These are pitch/interval, rhythm/meter in Bagatelles, the formal design and its relations with dynamics and texture in Konstellationen, as well as the usage of indeterminacy. There are also selected aspects of performance in regard to extended technique, pedaling, and certain dynamic control problems related to two works in question. Chapter one introduces the historical background of Polish music and the emergence of Poland as one of the leading forces in contemporary music. It also provides the musical background of Moszumanska-Nazar, as well as the stylistic features and representative works in her three compositional periods. Personal interviews and correspondence with the composer provide additional biographical and stylistic insight for this chapter. Chapter two focuses on the aspects of structural procedure. In Bagatelles, the structural elements are: organized pitch sets, the dominance of linear interval, scale pattern, dissonant intervals, as well as the rhythmic pattern and the various metric designs. Konstellationen present most interesting and unusual formal design in that the elements that delineate the form are dynamics, texture and certain pianistic devices, such as the ostinato, trills, abrupt high notes, irregular fast notes, and clusters. Chapter three addresses particularly the aleatoric elements. The study covers areas of pitch, rhythm, and form with a brief introduction of music in indeterminacy. Chapter four turns to several issues pertaining to the performance aspects. These include pedaling, extended techniques, and dynamic control. The last part of this chapter draws conclusions from the observation and analysis of the two works in question.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Long, Christina Ay-Chen
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Songs of Sidney Homer, with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Verdi, Handel, Brahms, Poulenc, Ives, Loewe, Fauré, Floyd and Others

Description: Now all but forgotten, the songs of Sidney Homer (1864-1953) were at one time well-regarded and often performed. Married to the great American contralto Louise Homer, he was in a unique position to have his songs performed by the great artists of the time. Unlike the cloying "parlor songs" of many of his contemporaries, his works consistently demonstrate a respect for both the great poets as well as the European art-song tradition. One of the most cosmopolitan of the American composers of his day, his involvement with Louise's career brought him into contact with many of the great composers and performers of the day including Massenet, Puccini, Humperdinck, Mahler, Toscanini and Caruso. When viewed in their entirety, his songs reveal not only a tremendous variety, but also the maturation of his compositional style.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Snider, Jeffrey
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Utilization of Folk Song Elements in Selected Works by Ralph Vaughan Williams and Percy Grainger with Subsequent Treatment Exemplified in the Wind Band music of David Stanhope

Description: An examination of the utilization of folk song elements in the wind band music of Australian composer David Stanhope, represented in two movements ("Lovely Joan" and "Rufford Park Poachers") from his Folk Songs for Band. Sets 1 and 2. Included is an historical overview of English folk music, emphasizing the theoretical properties of the English folk song and the events surrounding the modern renaissance of British folk music. Background information related to the musical development of Vaughan Williams, Grainger, and Stanhope is provided, noting the influence of the folk idiom in their compositional styles and Grainger's influence on the music of David Stanhope. An historical account of the two folk songs examines the events and compositional procedures related to the inclusion of "Lovely Joan" in Vaughan Williams' Fantasia on Greensleeves. and Grainger's use of "Rufford Park Poachers" in Lincolnshire Posv. Emphasis is placed on the subsequent compositional treatment of the folk elements in Stanhope's wind band compositions. A detailed analysis of Stanhope's compositional style includes structural, harmonic, melodic, and historical considerations, while specifically illuminating his contemporary and innovative approaches to scoring and instrumentation.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Birdwell, John Cody
Partner: UNT Libraries

Soloistic Writing for the Oboe in the Arias of Handel's Operas, with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Marcello, Strauss, Ravel, Bach, Handel, Saint-Saens and Others

Description: Although long-neglected, the topic of Handel's operatic oeuvre has in recent years gained new currency. Of interest to oboists is the great amount of soloistic writing for the oboe in the arias of his operas which takes the form of obbligato solos. From this body of works approximately twenty operas contain soloistic writing for the oboe in conjunction with the voice. The rationale for the investigation of this topic is two-fold: first, to make oboists aware of the availability of this body of literature, and second, to explore the manner and extent to which Handel used the oboe as an obbligato instrument. Topics covered include the instrumental make-up of Handel's orchestra and a brief history of the obbligato aria beginning with the early trumpet arias. An examination of Handel's compositional technique precedes a detailed analysis of six examples of varying style. The conclusion considers the aesthetics of performing these pieces out of context in light of historical practice and perception.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Hiramoto, Stephen Anthony
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparative Study of the Bel Canto Teaching Styles and their Effects on Vocal Agility

Description: This thesis examines the historical significance of the vocal methods employed from the middle of the seventeenth century to the beginning of the nineteenth century in what became known as the bel canto era. It provides further exploration into the pedagogical procedures of the bel canto technique through a study of the premier instructors and singers from this period. The resurgence of interest in this tradition is addressed along with its impact on current vocal pedagogy. The vital role that vocal agility played as one of its most distinguishing traits is the primary factor under investigation. A discussion of the bel canto teaching styles in relation to their approach to agility is a major point of inquiry. By maintaining a link between present artists and pedagogues and the old Italian school, it helps the singer understand the historical implications of vocal agility as an integral part of healthy vocal development.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Harper, Portia
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Dramatic Aspects of Thea Musgrave's Narcissus for Solo Flute and Digital Delay (1987) : With Three Recitals of Selected Works by Bach, Feld, Debussy, Persichetti, Berio, Varese, Mozart, Roussel, and Others

Description: An examination of the compositional style, subject matter, and use of technology as found in Thea Musgrave's 1987 composition Narcissus for solo flute and digital delay. Includes a short history of Musgrave's formal training, an overview of her creative output, and a discussion of the evolution of her compositional style from her studies with Boulanger in Paris to the present with special emphasis on her dramatic-abstract concept and her forays into post-modernism. Provides insight into Musgrave's choice of mythological text, the literary basis of the Narcissus legend, and its impact on Western thought. Identification of principal motifs, discussion of harmonic implications, melodic language, and optional intermedia effects; and explanation of the electronic effects used within the work. Detailed analysis of the motifs, their electronic manipulations, and how they represent aurally the characters of the Narcissus myth. Listing of Musgrave's works with flute or piccolo in a primary role, details of her transcription of Narcissus for solo clarinet, and diagrams of digital delay controls and stage setting follow as appendices.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Boyd, Diane, 1967-
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Preferred Oboe Vibrato: An Analysis of Pitch Modulation and Intensity Level Modulation

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the pitch and intensity level characteristics found in the vibrati of preferred oboe players whose vibrato was ranked by a panel of experts. The investigation also sought to discover factors that distinguish the preferred oboe vibrato from vibrato that is less preferred.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Remley, Jon Stephen
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Function of Oral Tradition in Mary Lou's Mass by Mary Lou Williams

Description: The musical and spiritual life of Mary Lou Williams (1910 - 1981) came together in her later years in the writing of Mary Lou's Mass. Being both Roman Catholic and a jazz pianist and composer, it was inevitable that Williams would be the first jazz composer to write a setting of the mass. The degree of success resulting from the combination of jazz and the traditional forms of Western art music has always been controversial. Because of Williams's personal faith and aesthetics of music, however, she had little choice but to attempt the union of jazz and liturgical worship. After a biography of Williams, discussed in the context of her musical aesthetics, this thesis investigates the elements of conventional mass settings and oral tradition found in Mary Lou's Mass.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Fledderus, France
Partner: UNT Libraries