986 Matching Results

Search Results

Mini-Brayton economic RTG study. Final report

Description: The objective of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of a radioisotope heated Mini-Brayton power system to the 1973 USAF/AEC requirements established for the SURVSATCOM Mission. The principal requiremenets of the power system, are: 400 We power level; maximum weight 205 lbs.; $1.2 to 2.0 million per unit cost; and 5y mission duration. A radioisotope heat source that meets the ACE Nuclear Safety Criteria is presented. The major aspects of the Reference Design MB-ERTG are summarized. The Reference Design, utilizes a flexible Brayton rotating unit (BRU), a /sup 244/Cm heat source with ceramic clad fuel cylinders and an aluminum radiator. The flexible BRU has a variable power output capability, from 400 We to 3000 We, and is an important factor in the formulation of a cost effective development plan. The system weight is 186 lb and unit cost, including the /sup 244/Cm fuel, acceptance testing and delivery is $748,000. The total development cost for the 5-yr program is estimated at $16.4M with an additional $6.5M required for /sup 244/Cm heat source development support, /sup 244/Cm fuel, heat source fabrication and capital equipment expenditures. (LCL)
Date: January 1, 1974
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cover gas seals: FFTF-LMFBR seal test program

Description: The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor-inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configurations provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the CRBRP to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, T.S. & Shimazaki, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defects in metal crystals. Progress report, May 1, 1973--April 30, 1974

Description: Progress was made in the following areas: FIM (field ion microscopy) studies of defects in W irradiated with W ions or electrons; FIM studies of Au irradiated with Au or Xe ions; FIM and electrical resistivity study of vacancy defects in quenched W; FIM studies of dilute Pt alloys; measurement of the range of focused replacement sequences in Au; investigation of grain boundary strtucture (using Au); FIM observation of dissociated screw dislocations in Mo; calculation of properties of point defects in metals; and atom probe FIM. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Balluffi, R.W. & Seidman, D.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications of a revived Euler--Shohat Perturbation expansion technique in the study of ocean circulation. [Coastal waters]

Description: Consideration of geophysical vertical plane flows in estuaries and on continental shelves results in nonlinearly coupled partial differential equations for flow and density variables. For the case of steady flow, the equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations by the use of similarity transformations. The remaining nonlinearly coupled ordinary differential equations are solved using a revised Euler-Shohat perturbation technique. An existence theorem for this application of the technique is stated and proved.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Pietrafesa, L.J.; Struble, R.A. & Klinck, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Manganese cycling in the Newport River estuary, North Carolina

Description: Dissolved manganese (Mn) was measured in the Newport River estuary, North Carolina, in October 1974, February 1975, and APRIL 1975 by extraction on Chelex-100 resin and subsequent analysis by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissolved Mn concentrations at intermediate salinities were in excess of those predicted by conservative mixing of inflowing river and ocean water, with maxima between 4{per thousand} and 14{per thousand} salinity. Reduction and solubilization of Mn in bottom sediments in the upper estuary probably supplies much of the added dissolved Mn. Fixation of dissolved Mn on particles takes place in the lower estuary with subsequent upstream recycling. The export of dissolved Mn from the estuary in excess of that input by the river is probably balanced by continuous traction flows of river-derived bed sediment or pulse inputs of suspended sediment in storm runoff followed by partial solubilization. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Evans, D.W.; Cutshall, N.H. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Oceanography); Cross, F.A. & Wolfe, D.A. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Beaufort, NC (United States). Atlantic Estuarine Fisheries Center)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report on the reconnaissance resistivity survey in the East Mesa area, Imperial County, California for U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation

Description: A section of notes on geothermal exploration using the resistivity method precedes the main body of the paper. Field data from the Broadlands Area of New Zealand, Java, and the Imperial Valley, California are included. The reconnaissance resistivity survey recently completed in the East Mesa Area confirmed that a broad zone of low resistivities at depth extends through the area in a NNW direction. The interpretation of the resistivity data and the location of the resistivity lows at depth is much less definite in the Imperial Valley than it is in other areas of geothermal exploration. This is due to the extremely low background level of resistivities. The low resistivities in the Imperial Valley are due to the high porosity of the sediments and the high salinity of the solutions contained within the rock. The expected decrease in resistivity due to elevated temperature is much more difficult to detect in this environment. Edges of the zones of low resistivities have been delineated in almost all directions. (JGB)
Date: January 21, 1974
Creator: Bell, B.S. & Hallof, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department