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Geothermal systems of northern Nevada

Description: Hot springs are numerous and nearly uniformly distributed in northern Nevada. Most occur on the flanks of basins, along Basin and Range (late Miocene to Holocene) faults, while some occur in the inner parts of the basins. Surface temperatures of the springs range from slightly above ambient to boiling; some springs are superheated. Maximum subsurface water temperatures calculated on the basis of quartz solubility range as high as 252/sup 0/C, although most are below 190/sup 0/C. Flows range from a trickle to several hundred liters per minute. The Nevada geothermal systems differ markedly from the power-producing system at The Geysers, Calif., and from those areas with a high potential for power production (e.g., Yellowstone Park, Wyo.; Jemez Mountains, N. Mex.). These other systems are associated with Quaternary felsic volcanic rocks and probably derive their heat from cooling magma rather high in the crust. In northern Nevada, however, felsic volcanic rocks are virtually all older than 10 million years, and analogous magmatic heat sources are, therefore, probably lacking. Nevada is part of an area of much higher average heat flow than the rest of the United States. In north-central Nevada, geothermal gradients are as great as 64/sup 0/C per kilometer in bedrock and even higher in basin fill. The high gradients probably result from a combination of thin crust and high temperature upper mantle. It is suggested that the geothermal systems of northern Nevada result from circulation of meteoric waters along Basin and Range faults and that their temperature chiefly depends upon (1) depth of circulation and (2) the geothermal gradient near the faults.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Hose, R. K. & Taylor, B. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 3. An evaluation of thermal water in the Weiser area, Idaho

Description: The Weiser area encompasses about 200 square miles in southwest Idaho and contains two thermal water areas: (1) the Crane Creek subarea, which is 12 miles east of Weiser, Idaho, and (2) the Weiser Hot Springs subarea, which is 5 miles northwest of Weiser. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Miocene to Pleistocene age have been faulted and folded to form the northwest-trending anticlines present in much of the area. Basalt of the Columbia River Group or underlying rocks are believed to constitute the reservoir for the hot water. Gravity and magnetic anomalies are present in both subareas. A preliminary audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a shallow conductive zone is associated with each thermal site. Above-normal ground temperatures measured at a depth of 1 metre below the land surface in the Weiser Hot Springs subarea correlate with relatively high concentrations of boron in underlying ground waters, which, in turn, are usually associated with thermal waters in the study area. Sampled thermal waters are of a sodium chloride sulfate or sodium sulfate type, having dissolved-solids concentrations that range from 225 to 1,140 milligrams per litre. Temperatures of sampled waters ranged from 13/sup 0/ to 92.0/sup 0/C. Minimum aquifer temperatures calculated from chemical analysis of water, using geochemical thermometers, were 170/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C in the Crane Creek and Weiser Hot Springs subareas, respectively. Estimated maximum temperatures ranged from 212/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/ to 242/sup 0/C, respectively, in these subareas. The probable heat sources for both subareas are (1) young magmatic intrusive rocks underlying the basalt or (2) above-normal temperatures resulting from thinning of the earth's crust. Maps are included.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Young, H. W. & Whitehead, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multipurpose use of geothermal energy. Proceedings of the international conference on geothermal energy for industrial, agricultural, and commercial-residential uses, October 7--9, 1974, Klamath Falls, Oregon

Description: Seventeen papers are presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for all papers for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and for thirteen of the papers for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (LBS)
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Lienau, P. J. & Lund, J. W. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear power: engineering facts and environmental issues. Final report, June 23, 1974--June 27, 1974. [Instructional activities for one-week workshop for high school teachers on environmental aspects of power generation and safety of nuclear power plants]

Description: The outline is presented of a one-week workshop for high school teachers on the environmental aspects of power generation and safety requirements for nuclear power plants. Instructional activities consisted of lectures, demonstration laboratory sessions, and a tour of the Davis-Besse nuclear power plant. (CH)
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Kikuchi, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-temperature series expansions for isotropic Heisenberg model in one and two dimensions: I

Description: This preliminary report considers all the clusters with n less than or equal to 10 and l less than or equal to 10 on a regular square lattice and uses the representations of the symmetric group to calculate their partition functions as a series in powers of the reciprocal temperature 1/T up to twentieth order. The contribution of these clusters to the free energy are computed for the infinite regular square lattice in zero external magnetic field. The contribution of the external field can be calculated exactly to any desired power in the reciprocal temperature. This calculation is carried out for the linear lattice. The complete contribution to twentieth order for an infinite square lattice must include graphs that cover remaining clusters up to n = 20 and l = 20. The contributions of these graphs will be found in a subsequent publication. However, the expression for the linear lattice is complete. It should be mentioned that the computations are completely free of rounding errors. 4 figs., 3 tables.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Gujrati, P. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Baseline Gas Turbine Development Program fifth quarterly progress report

Description: Progress is reported for a program to demonstrate by 1976 an experimental gas turbine powered automobile which meets the 1976 Federal Emissions Standards, has significantly improved fuel economy, and is competitive in performance, reliability, and potential manufacturing cost with the conventional piston engine powered, standard size American automobile. Baseline engines 5, 6, and 7 were built. Action to correct a 7 percent power deficiency is underway. Two baseline vehicles are operational, with the third ready for engine installation. Measurement of baseline performance and emissions is in process. NASA Lewis has their baseline engine installation operational. They are also assemblying a cold flow power turbine test rig and have made substantial progress in defining upgraded engine aerodynamics. A study was made of sizing the upgraded engine for a compact size vehicle. Chrysler's proprietary linerless insulation was installed into the endurance engine. Evaluation was delayed by a power turbine section failure. Substantial progress was made in Chrysler's proprietary low emissions burner program. Preparations are being made to evaluate the Solar burner. Evaluation of ceramic regenerator cores are in process. A seal development program was initiated. AiResearch has most of the integrated control system preprototype elements defined, and has many key elements under test. Their transient engine simulation model is nearly operational. A compressor turbine wheel disc is being designed utilizing Pratt-Whitney superplastic forging properties. Procurement of two variable inlet guide vane assemblies is about complete. Detail drawings of a Free Rotor vehicle installation are being completed.
Date: January 31, 1974
Creator: Wagner, C. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report, November 1958--June 30, 1974

Description: A summary of research work at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute undertaken in the period November 1958 to June 1974 is reported. Also included are a description of the facility, listings of research projects and publications, and identification of personnel. (SDF)
Date: January 1, 1974
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Program, LES 8/9 Program, MJS Program. Bi-monthly progress report, 1 September--31 October 1974

Description: Significant events, activities and achievements on the MHW LES 8/9 and MJS Programs for the reporting period are reported. Topics discussed include programmatic, safety, systems, isotope heat source, converter, product assurance, acceptance testing, and converter fabrication. (TFD)
Date: January 1, 1974
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drag of heated circular cylinders

Description: ERDA has been conducting high altitude drop tests of a heated cylinder in order to obtain aerodynamic data for use in the satellite power supply program. The cylinder simulated the cylindrical heat source for the MHW-RTG. Since drop testing is an expensive and difficult method of testing, a wind tunnel technique was developed. Results of the tests are presented. (TFD)
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Carr, S. R. & Marchman, J. F. III
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High statistics study of. omega. /sup 0/ production

Description: Results from a study of ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. ..omega../sup 0/n at 6.0 GeV/c based on 28,000 events from a charged and neutral spectrometer are reported. Background under the ..omega../sup 0/ is only 7 percent, a large improvement over deuterium bubble chamber work. Density matrix elements, projected cross sections and effective trajectories for natural and unnatural exchanges are presented.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Shaevitz, M. H.; Abolins, M. A. & Dankowych, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report on dc soundings over a geothermal prospect in the Bruneau-Grand View area, Idaho

Description: The d-c sounding survey confirms the presence of a large conductive section of sedimentary and volcanic rocks underlying the low-resistivity AMT anomaly defined by Hoover. Within the conductive section, resistivity boundaries between sedimentary rocks of the Idaho Group, the Banbury Basalt, and Idavada Volcanics appear to be entirely obscured, at least where well data are available. True resistivities near these contacts range from about 3 to 5.5 ohm-m, about 3 to 10 times less than would be expected for similar volcanic rock types saturated with fresh water. Because water samples from wells in the Bruneau-Grand View area are relatively fresh, the greatly decreased resistivities are probably related to a combination of thermal waters and alteration within the volcanic rocks and perhaps also within part of the sedimentary section. The d-c soundings trace the low resistivity zone beyond the limits of the AMT survey to the east as far as the town of Hammett, where a zone of 4.4 ohm-m material 640 m thick is present. To the west the conductive section terminates about 5 km east of Oreana, where truncation of the conductive section appears to be related to decreasing lateral porosity. The 1 to 7 ohm-m conductive section can still be recognized beneath the Snake River Plain between Bruneau and Mountain Home, although the top of the conductor is deeper and the thickness is less than at any other sounding location. The presence of a high-resistivity basement suggests that thermal fluids probably emanate from greater depths than this survey can resolve, rise along fault zones, of which there appear to be many, and then spread laterally through lithologic units that have sufficient porosity. Stratigraphic maps are included.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Jackson, D. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of compound parabolic concentrator for solar energy collection

Description: The joint team of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Chicago is reporting their midyear results of a proof-of-concept investigation of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) for solar-energy collection. The CPC is a non-imaging, optical-design concept for maximally concentrating radiant energy onto a receiver. This maximum concentration corresponds to a relative aperture (f/number) of 0.5, which is well beyond the limit for imaging collectors. We have constructed an X3 concentrating flat-plate collector 16 ft/sup 2/ in area. This collector has been tested in a trailer laboratory facility built at ANL. The optical and thermal performance of this collector was in good agreement with theory. We have constructed an X10 collector (8 ft/sup 2/) and started testing. A detailed theoretical study of the optical and thermal characteristics of the CPC design has been performed.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Rabi, A.; Sevcik, V. J.; Giugler, R. M. & Winston, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy and environment annual report 1974. [Environmental Research programs]

Description: Research in the Division's environmental science program includes air pollution, water pollution, and the effects of pollutants on man and natural ecosystems. Work has focused on the chemistry and physics of particle surfaces. Using the technique of electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), surface reactions of sulfur and nitrogen compounds have been studied, and results include the identification of new chemical forms of nitrogen on particle surfaces and evidence for the importance of particle surfaces in the catalysis of sulfur dioxide to sulfuric acid. The Division's work in water pollution has been devoted to the study of trace metals in the estuarine environment, especially in San Francisco Bay. Studies on the effect of dredging operations on trace metals in the Mare Island ship channel and on the distribution of cadmium in Bay sediments have been performed. Research has also been conducted on the distribution of trace elements between bound states on suspended particles and in solution in Bay waters. Research is being conducted on a variety of problems relating to effects of pollutants. Biological studies seeking to discover effects of specific environmental insults such as oxidants at the cellular level have been done, and epidemiological studies have been initiated on the impacts of trace metals on human health. Theoretical studies in an attempt to develop a basis for assessing the stability of ecological systems are also being undertaken.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Blumstein, C. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Toxic fumes from explosives: ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixtures

Description: The Bureau of Mines has carried out experimental and theoretical studies with prilled and pulverized ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (AN-FO) mixtures containing varying amounts of fuel oil in an attempt to quantify the effects of stoichiometric composition, nonideal detonation behavior, and expansion volume on the production of CO, NO, and NO/sub 2/ fumes. Experimental fume measurements were obtained in the Bureau's large closed gallery facility (7.2 x 10/sup 4/ liter expansion chamber) and in the standard Crawshaw-Jones apparatus (90-liter expansion chamber) using a prepackaged charge configuration containing about 450 g of explosives. The theoretical calculation of toxic fumes was achieved with an equilibrium detonation code called TIGER. Contrary to initial expectations, the NO/sub x/ (= NO + NO/sub 2/) fumes from the large gallery test were found to be in essential agreement with the Crawshaw-Jones results. It was also concluded that TIGER calculations offer a good approach to the prediction of toxic fumes; there is a basic problem in extrapolating laboratory measurements of CO fumes to mine conditions, this being due to postdetonation oxidation of CO to CO/sub 2/; and the detonation velocity decay rate of an explosive is a useful experimental parameter for correlating toxic fumes production with nonideal detonation behavior.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Chaiken, R. F.; Cook, E. B. & Ruhe, T. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering study: Fast Flux Test Facility fuel reprocessing

Description: Several alternatives were studied for reprocessing FFTF fuels at Hanford. Alternative I would be to decontaminate and trim the fuel at T Plant and electrolytically dissolve the fuel at Purex. Alternative II would be to decontaminate and shear leach the fuels in a new facility near Purex. Alternative III would be to decontaminate and store fuel elements indefinitely at T Plant for subsequent offsite shipment. Alternative I, 8 to 10 M$ and 13 quarter-years; for Alternative II, 24 to 28 M$ and 20 quarter-years; for Alternative III, 3 to 4 M$ and 8 quarter-years. Unless there is considerable slippage in the FFTF shipping schedule, it would not be possible to build a new facility as described in Alternative II in time without building temporary storage facilities at T Plant, as described in Alternative III. (auth)
Date: January 7, 1974
Creator: Beary, M. M.; Raab, G. J.; Reynolds, W. R. Jr. & Yoder, R. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal conductivity of the V/sub k/ center in CaF/sub 2/

Description: The thermocurrent properties of the V/sub k/ center in CaF/sub 2/ were investigated. The thermocurrent properties during irradiation as a function of temperature indicate that the number of V/sub k/ centers produced per Roentgen decreases with increasing temperatures. The V/sub k/ lifetime and activation energy were determined.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Mayhugh, M. R. & Moran, P. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department