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Geothermal R and D project report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1977

Description: Testing and analysis on the three deep geothermal wells in Raft River and the two shallow (1200 ft) wells in Boise, plus the experiments leading to improved technology and lower cost for electricity produced from 300/sup 0/F wells are covered. Non-electric direct heat uses of geothermal, to as low as 100/sup 0/F also receive special attention. Appendix A contains a paper: ''Evaluation and Design Considerations for Liquid-Liquid Direct Contact Heat Exchangers for Geothermal Applications.'' Appendix B is a summary of the Freon-113 experiment results. (MHR)
Date: May 1, 1977
Creator: Kunze, J. F. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976

Description: Progress during April to July 1976 in research on geothermal energy is reported. The experiments are performed in the Raft River Valley, Idaho, a hydrothermal resource site with water temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. During this period, a third well, RRGE-3 was drilled and well production was tested, testing of a direct contact heat exchanger continued, design and cost estimating continued on a 40 MW (th) organic-binary heat exchange facility, agricultural studies of irrigation with geothermal water progressed, and down-hole data was obtained from RRGE-3. (LCL)
Date: October 1, 1976
Creator: Kunze, J. F. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLL Geothermal Energy Program. Status report, January 1976--January 1977

Description: Titles of the five sections are: program description; program plans and results; energy-conversion engineering; brine chemistry and materials; and earth sciences program. The last three sections were abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)
Date: April 27, 1977
Creator: Austin, A. L.; Lundberg, A. W.; Owen, L. B. & Tardiff, G. E. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reservoir engineering report for the magma-SDG and E geothermal experimental site near the Salton Sea, California

Description: A description of the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir is given and includes approximate fault locations, geology (lithology), temperatures, and estimates of the extent of the reservoir. The reservoir's temperatures and chemical composition are also reviewed. The flow characteristics are discussed after analyses of drillstem tests and extended well tests. The field production, reserves and depletion are estimated, and the effects of fractures on flow and depletion are discussed. The reservoir is believed to be separated into an ''upper'' and ''lower'' portion by a relatively thick and continuous shale layer. The upper reservoir is highly porous, with high permeability and productivity. The lower reservoir is at least twice as large as the upper but has much lower storativity and permeability in the rock matrix. The lower reservoir may be highly fractured, and its temperatures and dissolved solids are greater than those of the upper reservoir. The proven reserves of heat in the upper reservoir are about /sup 1///sub 4/ GW.yr (in the fluid) and /sup 1///sub 3/ GW.yr (in the rock). In the lower reservoir the proven reserves of heat are 5/sup 3///sub 4/ GW.yr (in the fluid) and 17 GW.yr (in the rock). Unproven reserves greatly exceed these numbers. Injection tests following well completion imply that hydraulic fracturing has taken place in two of the SDG and E wells and at least one other well nearby.
Date: July 12, 1976
Creator: Schroeder, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity

Description: Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Tyler, N.; Barton, M. D.; Bebout, D. G.; Fisher, R. S.; Grigsby, J. D.; Guevara, E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of field verification tests in the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado

Description: The Piceance Basin of western Colorado contains a major potential natural gas resource in Mesaverde blanket and lenticular low permeability gas sands. The basin has been a pilot study area for government sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This work culminated in the Multiwell Experiment (MWX), a field laboratory consisting of three closely spaced wells, designed by the Department of Energy to study the reservoir and production characteristics of the low permeability sands of the Mesaverde Group in the Rulison Field near Rifle, Colorado. The purpose of this study is to compare geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of the existing Mesaverde producing areas in the Piceance Basin with those same characteristics at the Multiwell site. This study has been performed in two sequential parts, Phase I and Phase II. In Phase I the geologic, production and reservoir engineering parameters were developed for the existing Mesaverde gas producing areas through analysis of log suites, well completion information and production histories. The southern part of the basin was partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Phase II consisted of field verification tests with cooperative industry partners in which new subsurface geologic and production information was collected in the partitioned areas to be compared with that at MWX. This report presents the results of Phase II investigations.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Kukal, G. C.; Price, E. H.; Hill, R. E. & Monson, E. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs

Description: The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.
Date: March 31, 1990
Creator: Calhoun, J. C. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Petroleum Engineering and Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering annual report, 1990--1991 academic year

Description: The Department of Petroleum Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is one of more than 20 such departments in the United States and more than 40 worldwide. The department has more than 20 faculty members and, as of the fall of 1990, 146 undergraduate and 156 graduate students. During the 1990--91 academic year, undergraduate enrollment is up slightly from the several downturns that began in 1986; graduate enrollment continues to increase, significantly in the number of Ph.D. candidates enrolled. The 1990--91 academic year was one of consolidation of gains. A remote teaching program in the Midland-Odessa area was initiated. During 1991, the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (CPGE) continued its large, diversified research activities related to oil, gas and geopressured/geothermal energy production, energy and mineral resources analysis, and added new research projects in other areas such as groundwater remediation. Many of these research projects included interdisciplinary efforts involving faculty, research scientists and graduate students in chemistry, mathematics, geology, geophysics, engineering mechanics, chemical engineering, microbiology and other disciplines. Several projects were undertaken in cooperation with either the Bureau of Economic Geology or the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin. Collaborative research projects with scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rice University, and Sandia National Laboratory were also initiated. About 43 companies from seven countries around the world continued to provide the largest portion of research funding to CPGE.
Date: January 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal Project, Idaho

Description: Results of the production and interference tests conducted on the geothermal wells RRGE 1 and RRGE 2 in Raft River Valley, Idaho during September--November, 1975 are presented. In all, three tests were conducted, two of them being short-duration production tests and one, a long duration interference test. In addition to providing estimates on the permeability and storage parameters of the geothermal reservoir, the tests also indicated the possible existence of barrier boundaries. The data collected during the tests also indicated that the reservoir pressure varies systematically in response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the sun and the moon. Overall, the results of the tests indicate that the geothermal reservoir in southern Raft River valley is fairly extensive and significantly permeable and merits further exploration.
Date: May 1977
Creator: Narasimhan, T. N. & Witherspoon, P. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stanford Geothermal Program (quarterly technical report, July--September 1991)

Description: Progress for the reporting period is summarized on the following: analyzing multiwell pressure data for a composite reservoir with a circular discontinuity, adsorption theory from the point of view of numerical simulation, effects adsorption/desorption on reinjection and tracer analysis, and estimation of adsorption parameters from experimental and field data. (MHR)
Date: October 31, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reservoir characterization by crosshole seismic imaging

Description: This report covers the investigation on the field use of crosshole measurements in reservoir characterization. This investigation was planned for a four year effort. (Year 1) Preparation. (Year 2) Use of vertically polarized shear waves. (Year 3) Addition of horizontally polarized shear waves. (Year 4) Present static image of reservoir properties and observe the time varying phenomena in reservoir by reshooting high frequency compressional (P) survey. This report covers the first six months of the third year.
Date: June 10, 1992
Creator: Turpening, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Research on improved and enhanced oil recovery in Illinois through reservoir characterization, March 28, 1992--June 28, 1992

Description: This project will provide information that can maximize hydrocarbon production, minimize formation damage and stimulate new production in Illinois. Such information includes definition of hydrocarbon resources, characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and the implementation of methods that will improve hydrocarbon extractive technology. Increased understanding of reservoir heterogeneities that affect oil recovery can aid in identifying producible resources. The transfer of technology to industry and the general public is a significant component of the program. The project is designed to examine selected subsurface oil reservoirs in Illinois. Scientists use advanced scientific techniques to gain a better understanding of reservoir components and behavior and address ways of potentially increasing the amount of recoverable oil. Initial production rates for wells in the Illinois Basin commonly decline quite rapidly and as much as 60 percent of the oil in place can be unrecoverable using standard operating procedures. Heterogeneities (geological differences in reservoir make-up) affect a reservoir's capability to release fluids. By-passed mobile and immobile oil remain in the reservoir. To learn how to get more of the oil out of reservoirs, the ISGS is studying the nature of reservoir rock heterogeneities and their control on the distribution and production of bypassed, mobile oil. Accomplishment for this period are summarized for the following tasks: mapping, cross-sections; subsurface depo-systems; outcrop studies; oil and gas development maps; engineering work; SEM/EDX; and clay minerals.
Date: January 1, 1992
Creator: Oltz, D. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of reservoir evaluation tests, 1976 East Mesa Geothermal Field, California

Description: Two interference well tests, conducted at the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's East Mesa geothermal test facility in Southern California by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, serve to better define the geothermal reservoir's geometry and hydrologic characteristics. Temperature profiles taken indicate that the reservoir is approximately 3000 feet thick and is located about 6000 feet below the ground surface. The temperature at depth is approximately 350{sup 0}C. The two well tests, each of approximately 10 days' duration yield respectively reservoir transmissivities of 11,200 and 29,500 millidarcy-feet and compressibilities of 5.7 x 10{sup -3} and 2.1 x 10{sup -3} feet per psi. The tests also indicate the possible presences of a sealed fault and a leaky fault in the reservoir.
Date: July 1, 1977
Creator: Narasimhan, T. N.; McEdwards, D. G. & Witherspoon, P. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geohydrological environmental effects of geothermal power production: Phase I. Final report

Description: Results are presented for the first phase of a three-phase research effort to develop reliable computer simulators whereby field information for a specific liquid- or vapor-dominated geothermal system can be used to predict reservoir performance and subsurface environmental effects due to production and reinjection of geothermal fluids. The environmental effects of interest include land surface subsidence, induced seismic activity, and pollution of freshwater aquifers by geothermal brines. The approach is to develop large-scale finite-difference and finite-element computer programs, based upon fundamental principles, and to validate these codes using both laboratory measurements and field data. During the first year, separate codes were developed for describing the multiphase multidimensional unsteady flow of steam and water in a heterogeneous geologic setting without rock deformation, and for calculating the response of a multidimensional rock matrix to prescribed pore pressure changes without specific consideration of fluid flow. Both of these codes were tested against analytic results and laboratory data, and the results of a few sample calculations are presented.
Date: September 1, 1975
Creator: Pritchett, J. W.; Garg, S. K.; Brownell, D. H. Jr. & Levine, H. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thin films, asphaltenes, and reservoir wettability

Description: Reservoir wettability impacts the success of oil recovery by waterflooding and other methods. To understand wettability and its alteration, thin-film forces in solid-aqueous-oil systems must be elucidated. Upon rupture of thick aqueous films separating the oil and rock phases, asphaltene components in the crude oil adsorb irreversibly on the solid surface, changing it from water-wet to oil-wet. Conditions of wettability alteration can be found by performing adhesion tests, in which an oil droplet is brought into contact with a solid surface. Exceeding a critical capillary pressure destabilizes the film, causing spontaneous film rupture to a molecularly adsorbed layer and oil adhesion accompanied by pinning at the three-phase contact line. The authors conduct adhesion experiments similar to those of Buckley and Morrow and simultaneously examine the state of the underlying thin film using optical microscopy and microinterferometry. Aqueous thin films between an asphaltic Orcutt crude oil and glass surfaces are studied as a function of aqueous pH and salinity. For the first time, they prove experimentally that strongly water-wet to strongly oil-wet wettability alteration and contact-angle pinning occur when thick aqueous films thin to molecularly adsorbed films and when the oil phase contains asphaltene molecules.
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Kaminsky, R.; Bergeron, V. & Radke, C. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Deriving the Shape Factor of a Fractured Rock Matrix

Description: Fluid flow from a fractured rock matrix was investigated for accurately predicting oil recovery from fractured reservoirs. To relate the oil rate with rock geometry and average rock matrix pressure, a shape factor is used in the mathematical model of fractured reservoirs. The shape factor in the transfer function was derived by solving the three-dimensional diffusivity equation of a rock matrix block under unsteady-state production, in contrast to the quasi-steady-state condition assumed by most previous studies denoted in the literature. The diffusivity equation in the x, y, and z coordinate was solved in four cases by assuming different boundary conditions of (1) constant fracture pressure; (2) constant flow rate; (3) constant fracture pressure followed by linearly declining fracture pressure; and (4) linearly declining fracture pressure followed by constant fracture pressure. Shape factor values are high at the initial depletion stage under an unsteady-state condition. When the fracture pressure is constant, the shape factor converges to {pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, 2{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, and 3{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2} for one-, two-, and three-dimensional rock matrix, respectively, at the dimensionless time ({tau}) of about 0.1. When the flow rate between the rock matrix and the fracture is constant, the fracture pressure varies with location on the rock surface. Based on the average fracture pressure, the shape factor decreases with production time until a {tau} value of 0.1 is reached. The boundary conditions of constant fracture pressure followed by a constant decline in fracture pressure are equivalent to the condition of a constant fracture pressure followed by a period of constant flow rate.
Date: September 1993
Creator: Chang, Ming-Ming
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical tracer test at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada. Geothermal Reservoir Technology research program

Description: In the injection test described, chemical tracers established the fluid flow between one injection well and one production well. Measured tracer concentrations, calculated flow rates, sampling schedules, and the daily events of the tracer test are documented. This experiment was designed to test the application of organic tracers, to further refine the predictive capability of the reservoir model, and to improve the effectiveness of Oxbow`s injection strategy.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Adams, M. C.; Moore, J. N.; Benoit, W. R.; Doughty, C. & Bodvarsson, G. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of artificial intelligence to reservoir characterization: An interdisciplinary approach. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1994

Description: The basis of this research is to apply novel techniques from Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in capturing, integrating and articulating key knowledge from geology, geostatistics, and petroleum engineering to develop accurate descriptions of petroleum reservoirs. The ultimate goal is to design and implement a single powerful expert system for use by small producers and independents to efficiently exploit reservoirs. The overall project plan to design the system to create integrated reservoir descriptions begins by initially developing an AI-based methodology for producing large-scale reservoir descriptions generated interactively from geology and well test data. Parallel to this task is a second task that develops an AI-based methodology that uses facies-biased information to generate small-scale descriptions of reservoir properties such as permeability and porosity. The third task involves consolidation and integration of the large-scale and small-scale methodologies to produce reservoir descriptions honoring all the available data. The final task will be technology transfer. With this plan, we have carefully allocated and sequenced the activities involved in each of the tasks to promote concurrent progress towards the research objectives. Moreover, the project duties are divided among the faculty and graduate students. The results of the integration are not merely limited to obtaining better characterizations of individual reservoirs. They have the potential to significantly impact and advance the discipline of reservoir characterization itself.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Kelkar, B. G.; Kerr, D. R.; Thompson, L. G. & Shenoi, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

Description: Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Tyler, N.; Barton, M. D.; Bebout, D. G.; Fisher, R. S.; Grigsby, J. D.; Guevara, E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

Description: This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Schoeling, L. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs. [Final report]

Description: The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.
Date: March 31, 1990
Creator: Calhoun, J. C. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Petroleum Engineering and Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering annual report, 1990--1991 academic year

Description: The Department of Petroleum Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is one of more than 20 such departments in the United States and more than 40 worldwide. The department has more than 20 faculty members and, as of the fall of 1990, 146 undergraduate and 156 graduate students. During the 1990--91 academic year, undergraduate enrollment is up slightly from the several downturns that began in 1986; graduate enrollment continues to increase, significantly in the number of Ph.D. candidates enrolled. The 1990--91 academic year was one of consolidation of gains. A remote teaching program in the Midland-Odessa area was initiated. During 1991, the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (CPGE) continued its large, diversified research activities related to oil, gas and geopressured/geothermal energy production, energy and mineral resources analysis, and added new research projects in other areas such as groundwater remediation. Many of these research projects included interdisciplinary efforts involving faculty, research scientists and graduate students in chemistry, mathematics, geology, geophysics, engineering mechanics, chemical engineering, microbiology and other disciplines. Several projects were undertaken in cooperation with either the Bureau of Economic Geology or the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin. Collaborative research projects with scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rice University, and Sandia National Laboratory were also initiated. About 43 companies from seven countries around the world continued to provide the largest portion of research funding to CPGE.
Date: December 31, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Development of a gas information system (GASIS)]. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1994--May 1994

Description: The project objective is to develop (1) a computerized natural gas recovery energy-related technology database, which will be primarily assembled from the basin atlas series--data sets, consisting of geology, production history, and reservoir engineering parameters of major gas reservoirs and (2) a directory to the various natural gas databases or information centers that are available. During this reporting period, work was performed on Task 1, Obtain User Input. Task 2, Develop Source Directory, and Task 3, Develop Natural Gas Data System. No work was done on Task 4, Technology Transfer, or Task 5, Storage Media. Accomplishments for this period are described briefly.
Date: October 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-resolution numerical methods for compressible multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. Progress report

Description: This is the first year in the proposed three-year effort to develop high-resolution numerical methods for multi-phase flow in hierarchical porous media. The issues being addressed in this research are: Computational efficiency: Field-scale simulation of enhanced oil recovery, whether for energy production or aquifer remediation, is typically highly under-resolved. This is because rock transport properties vary on many scales, and because current numerical methods have low resolution. Effective media properties: Since porous media are formed through complex geologic processes, they involve significant uncertainty and scale-dependence. Given this uncertainty, knowledge of ensemble averages of flow in porous media can be preferable to knowledge of flow in specific realizations of the reservoir. However, current models of effective properties do not represent the observed behavior very well. Relative permeability models present a good example of this problem. In practice, these models seldom provide realistic representations of hysteresis, interfacial tension effects or three-phase flow; there are no models that represent well all three effects simultaneously. Wave propagation: It is common in the petroleum industry to assume that the models have the same well-posedness properties as the physical system. An example of this fallacy is given by the three-phase relative permeability models; they were widely assumed by the petroleum community to produce hyperbolic systems for the Buckley-Leverett equations, but later the mathematics community proved that these models inherently produce local elliptic regions. Since numerical methods must use the models for computations, oscillations that develop could erroneously be attributed to numerical error rather than modeling difficulties. During this year, we have made significant progress on several tasks aimed at addressing these issues.
Date: March 15, 1993
Creator: Trangenstein, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department