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Elevated-temperature fatigue properties of two titanium alloys

Description: Report presenting an investigation to evaluate the unnotched fatigue properties of two titanium alloys at elevated temperatures. A variety of temperatures were tested and the results are provided in tabular form and as curves of stress versus cycles to failure for each test temperature. Both alloys were found to have potential use at the temperature ranges investigated.
Date: April 24, 1956
Creator: Rey, William K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase Separation and Second Phase Precipitation in Beta Titanium Alloys

Description: The current understanding of the atomic scale phenomenon associated with the influence of beta phase instabilities on the evolution of microstructure in titanium alloys is limited due to their complex nature. Such beta phase instabilities include phase separation and precipitation of nano-scale omega and alpha phases in the beta matrix. The initial part of the present study focuses on omega precipitation within the beta matrix of model binary titanium molybdenum (Ti-Mo) alloys. Direct atomic scale observation of pre-transition omega-like embryos in quenched alloys, using aberration-corrected high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT) was compared and contrasted with the results of first principles computations performed using the Vienna ab initio simulation package (VASP) to present a novel mechanism of these special class of phase transformation. Thereafter the beta phase separation and subsequent alpha phase nucleation in a Ti-Mo-Al ternary alloy was investigated by coupling in-situ high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction with ex-situ characterization studies performed using aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy and APT to develop a deeper understanding of the mechanism of transformation. Subsequently the formation of the omega phase in the presence of simultaneous development of compositional phase separation within the beta matrix phase of a Ti-10V-6Cu (wt%) alloy during continuous cooling has been investigated using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The results of these investigations provided novel insights into the mechanisms of solid-state transformations in metallic systems by capturing the earliest stages of nucleation at atomic to near atomic spatial and compositional resolution.
Date: May 2011
Creator: Devaraj, Arun
Partner: UNT Libraries

Neutron diffraction study of NiTi during compressive deformation and after shape-memory recovery

Description: Neutron diffraction measurements of internal elastic strains and texture were performed during compressive deformation of martensitic NiTi deforming by twinning. Rietveld refinement of the diffraction spectrum was performed in order to obtain lattice parameter variations and preferred orientation of martensitic variants. The elastic internal strains, are proportional to the externally applied stress but strongly dependent on crystallographic orientation. Plastic deformation by matrix twinning is consistent with type I (1-1-1) twinning, whereby (100) and (011) planes tend to align perpendicular and parallel to the stress axis, respectively. The preferred orientation ratio r according to the model by March and Dollase is proportional to the macroscopic plastic strain for (100) and (011) planes for loading, unloading and shape-memory recovery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first in situ bulk measurement of reversible twinning in NiTi. Finally, shape-memory recovery results in a marked change of NiTi cell parameters.
Date: September 1995
Creator: Dunand, D. C.; Mari, D.; Bourke, M. A. M. & Goldstone, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructure of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy after low-temperature irradiation by ions and neutrons.

Description: Recent interest in the application of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy in the ITER prompted an investigation of the effects of low-to-moderate temperature irradiation (<420 C) on the alloy's mechanical properties. Two sets of experiments were conducted. The effects of fast neutron irradiation to {approx_equal}4 dpa at 390 C were investigated in the X530 experiment in the EBR-II reactor. Irradiation with single (4.5-MeV Ni{sup 2}) and dual ion beams (350-keV He{sup +} simultaneously with 4.5-MeV Ni{sup 2}) complemented this study. TEM observations showed the formation of a high density of point-defect clusters and dislocation loops (<30 nm diameter) distributed uniformly in both types of specimens. Mechanical property testing of neutron irradiated material showed embrittlement of the alloy. The deformed microstructure were examined by TEM to determine the causes of embrittlement and revealed dislocation channels propagating through the undeformed matrix. The channels are the sole slip paths and they cause early onset of necking and loss of work-hardening. Based on a review of the available literature, suggestions are made for further research of slip localization in V-4Cr-4Ti alloys.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Gazda, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

X-ray emission from colliding laser plasmas

Description: Colliding Au, CD and Ti-Cr plasmas have been generated by illuminating two opposing foils each with a {approximately} 100J, 0.5 nsec, 2{omega} Nd-glass laser beam from the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos. The plasmas are being used to study plasma interactions which span the parameter regime from interpenetrating to collisional stagnation. X-ray emission during the laser target interaction and the subsequent collision is used to diagnose the initial plasma conditions and the colliding plasma properties. X-ray instrumentation consists of a 100 ps gated x-ray pinhole imager, a time-integratcd bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrograph and a gated x-ray spectrograph used to record isoelectronic spectra from the Ti-Cr plasmas. The imager has obtained multi-frame images of the collision and therefore, a measure of the stagnation length which is a function of the ion charge state and density and a strong function of the electron temperature. Other instrumentation includes a Thomson scattering spectrometer with probe beam, neutron detectors used to monitor the CD coated foil collisions and an ion spectrometer. We will describe the current status of the experiments and current results with emphasis on the x-ray emission diagnostics. We will also briefly describe the modeling using Lasnex and ISIS, a particle-in-cell code with massless fluid electrons and inter particle (classical) collisions.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Wilke, M.; Obst, A.W. & Winske, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion resistance of candidate transportation container materials

Description: The Department of Energy is currently remediating several sites that have been contaminated over the years with hazardous, mixed waste and radioactive materials. Regulatory guidelines require strict compliance demonstrating public safety during remediation and the transport of these hazardous, mixed waste and radioactive materials. The compatibility of the metallic transportation containers with the contents they are designed to transport is an ultimate concern that must be satisfied to ensure public safety. The transportation issue is inherently complicated due to the complex, varied, and unknown composition of the hazardous, mixed and radioactive waste that is being, considered for transport by the DOE facilities. Never before have the interactions between the waste being transported and the materials that comprise the transportation packages been more important. Therefore, evaluation of material performance when subjected to a simulated waste will ensure that all regulatory issues and requirements for transportation of hazardous, mixed, and radioactive wastes are satisfied. The tasks encompassed by this study include defining criteria for candidate material selection, defining a test matrix that will provide pertinent information on the material compatibility with the waste stimulant, and evaluation of material performance when subjected to a stimulant waste. Our goal is to provide package design engineers with a choice of materials which exhibit enhanced performance upon exposure to hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste that is similar in composition to the waste stimulant used in this study. Due to the fact that there are many other possible waste compositions, additional work needs to be done to broaden our materials compatibility/waste stream data base.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Maestas, L.M.; Sorensen, N.R. & McAllaster, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decomposition mechanism in supercooled liquid alloys.

Description: The authors performed small-angle neutron scattering experiments on the bulk amorphous alloy Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} (Vit1{reg_sign}) and on further alloys, where the ZrTi and CuBe content have been changed, following the tie-line in the direction of Zr{sub 46.8}Ti{sub 8.2}Cu{sub 7.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 27.5} (Vit4{reg_sign}). The SANS data of the samples, preannealed at temperatures between 330 C and 390 C, show interference peaks giving evidence for spatially correlated arrangements of inhomogeneities. The Q values of the interference peaks, Q{sub max}, decrease with increasing annealing temperature T{sub a} and, at a given annealing temperature, with composition following the tie-line from Vit1 to Vit4. They find that, in two distinguished regimes, the data follow a relation 1/L{sup 2} {proportional_to} T{sub a} as predicted by Cahn's theory (L = 2{pi}/Q{sub max} is the wavelength of the decomposition), with a crossover at the glass transition temperature T{sub g} = 350 C. The authors explain the crossover by different diffusion mechanisms below and above T{sub g}.
Date: July 12, 1999
Creator: Johnson, W. L.; Loffler, J. F. & Thiyagarajan, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ examination of moving crack tips in ordered intermetallics.

Description: Recent studies have shown that high stress concentrations at moving crack tips in the intermetallic compound NiTi can induce a crystalline-to-amorphous (C-A) transformation of the crack tip region. This stress-induced C-A transformation has a temperature dependence and crystallization behavior similar to those of ion irradiation-induced C-A transformation of NiTi. The present study examines if these similarities between stress- and irradiation-induced amorphization hold true for two other intermetallic compounds, CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti. In situ straining was performed in an intermediate-voltage transmission electron microscope. The presence or absence of an amorphous phase was determined by dark field imaging and selected area diffraction of crack tip regions. Crack tips in both CuTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti were found to remain crystalline upon fracture. The observed absence of stress-induced amorphization in Ni{sub 3}Ti is consistent with its known absence during irradiation, but the absence in CuTi differs from its known irradiation-induced amorphization behavior. Reasons for the similarity and difference are discussed.
Date: January 25, 1999
Creator: Heuer, J.; Lam, N. Q.; Okamoto, P. R. & Stubbins, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion considerations of high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys for high-level radioactive waste disposal containers

Description: Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project`s high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. High nickel alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessments of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns of involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250{degrees}C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 31 refs., 1 tab.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Gdowski, G.E. & McCright, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of controlled potential on SCC of nuclear waste package container materials

Description: The slow-strain-rate (SSR) test technique was used to evaluate the susceptibility of Titanium (Ti) Gr-7 (UNS R52400) and Ti Gr-12 (UNS R53400) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Ti Gr-7 and Ti Gr-12 are two candidate container materials for the multi-barrier package for nuclear waste. The tests were done in a deaerated 90 C acidic brine (pH {approx} 2.7) containing 5 weight percent (wt%) sodium chloride (NaCl) using a strain rate of 3.3 x 10{sup -6} sec{sup -1}. Before being tested in the acidic brine, specimens of each alloy were pulled inside the test chamber in the dry condition at ambient temperature. Then while in the test solution, specimens were strained under different cathodic (negative) controlled electrochemical potentials. These controlled potentials were selected based on the corrosion potential measured in the test solution before the specimens were strained. Results indicate that the times to failure (TTF) for Ti Gr-12 were much shorter than those for Ti Gr-7. Furthermore, as the applied potential became more cathodic, Ti Gr-12 showed reduced ductility in terms of percent reduction in area (%RA) and true fracture stress ({sigma}{sub f}). In addition, TTF and percent elongation (%El) reached the minimum values when Ti Gr-12 was tested under an impressed potential of -1162 mV. However, for Ti Gr-7, all these ductility parameters were not significantly influenced by the changes in applied potential. In general, the results of hydrogen analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) showed increased hydrogen concentration at more cathodic controlled potentials. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to evaluate the morphology of cracking both at the primary fracture face and the secondary cracks along the gage section of the broken tensile specimen. Transgranular secondary cracks were observed in both alloys possibly resulting from the formation of brittle titanium hydrides due to cathodic ...
Date: August 1, 1999
Creator: Lum, B Y; Roy, A K & Spragge, M K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preprocessing of backprojection images in the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center tomography system

Description: Neutron tomography is being investigated as a nondestructive technique for quantitative assessment of low atomic mass impurity concentration in metals. Neutrons maximize the sensitivity given their higher cross sections for low Z isotopes while tomography provides the three dimensional density information. The specific application is the detection of Hydrogen down to 200 ppm weight in aircraft engine compressor blades. A number of preprocessing corrections have been implemented for the backprojection images in order to achieve the detection requirements for a testing rate of three blades per hour. Among the procedures are corrections for neutron scattering and beam hardening. With these procedures the artifacts in tomographic reconstructions are shown to be less than the signal for 100 ppm hydrogen in titanium alloy samples.
Date: February 19, 1998
Creator: Gibbons, M. R., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaporation rate and composition monitoring of electron beam PVD processes

Description: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing sensor and control technology to improve the quality and range of applicability of electron beam PVD. The approach being developed uses tunable lasers to measure, the density and composition of the vapor plume. This paper reviews the principles of operation of laser based sensors and discusses data from experiments in which titanium and niobium are co-vaporized. Laser data agreed well with deposited film compositions and spatial variations in deposited film cross sections. Laser based vapor monitoring appears to have broad applicability and has the potential to extend the use of high rate electron beam PVD.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Braun, D.G.; Haynam, C.; Meier, T. & McClelland, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 6.7.3 - Interfacial Mass Transport Effects in Composite Materials

Description: Advanced metal-matrix composites (MMCS) consisting of titanium-based alloys possess some unique mechanical, physical, and chemical characteristics that make them highly desirable for aircraft and gas turbine engines. Tailoring MMC properties is essential for advanced product design in materials processing. The main factors that affect materials processing and, further, the nature of a metal-ceramic interface, its structure, and morphological stability is liquid surface mass transport related to adhesional wetting (physical effect) and reactive wetting (chemical effect).' Surfaces and interfaces dominate many of the technologically important processes in composite materials such as liquid-solid sintering and joining. The objective of this work is threefold: 1) to get insight into the role of the nonstoichiometry of chemical composition in ceramic materials used as reinforcement components in MMC processing, 2) to extend previous energetic analysis of mass transport phenomena to wetting behavior between liquid metal and the quasi-solidlike skin resulting from the presolidification of liquid on nonstoichiometric solids on a scale of interatomic distance, and 3) to provide experimental verification of our concept.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Nowok, Jan W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Do cracks melt their way through solids?

Description: Real-time, in situ fracture studies in the high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) show that microscopically thin regions of amorphous NiTi form ahead of moving crack tips in the B2-NiTi intermetallic compound during tensile straining at temperatures equal to or below 600K. The upper cutoff temperature of 600K for this stress-induced melting (or amorphization) is identical to the upper cutoff temperatures reported in the literature for both heavy-ion-induced amorphization of the intermetallic NiTi and ion-beam-mixing-induced amorphization of Ni and Ti multilayer. These results, together with the fact that the higher crystallization temperatures ({approximately}800K)of unrelaxed amorphous NiTi alloys obtained by rapid quenching can also be reduced to, but not lower than 600K, by heavy-ion irradiation, strongly suggest that structural relaxation processes enhanced or induced by dynamic atomic disordering allow the formation of a unique, fully-relaxed glassy state which is characterized by a unique isothermal crystallization temperature. We believe that this unique temperature is the Kauzmann glass-transition temperature, corresponding to the ideal glass having the same entropy as the crystalline state. As the glassy state with the lowest global free energy, the preferential formation of this ideal glass by disorder-induced amorphization processes can be understood as the most energetically-favored, kinetically-constrained melting response of crystalline materials driven far from equilibrium at low temperatures.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Okamoto, P. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

Description: Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner and outer container materials of currently-designed nuclear waste package was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 5 16 carbon steel and high-performance alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4, 625. C-22, and Ti Gr-12. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel alloys 825 and G-3 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in alloys G-30 and C-4. Alloy 625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion, crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only a slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base alloy C-22 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. Ti Gr-12 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed significant amount of precipitated particles during and after testing especially at higher temperatures.
Date: October 1, 1998
Creator: Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y & Roy, A K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 6.7.3 - Interfacial Mass Transport Effects in Composite Materials

Description: Advanced metal-matrix composites (MMCS) consisting of titanium-based alloys possess some unique mechanical, physical, and chemical characteristics that make them highly desirable for aircraft and gas turbine engines. Tailoring MMC properties is essential for advanced product design in materials processing. The main factors that affect materials processing and, further, the nature of a metal-ceramic interface, its structure, and morphological stability is liquid surface mass transport related to adhesional wetting physical effect) and reactive wetting (chemical effect). Surfaces and interfaces dominate many of the technologically important processes in composite materials such as liquid-solid sintering and joining. The objective of this work is threefold: 1) to get insight into the role of the nonstoichiometry of chemical composition in ceramic materials used as reinforcement components in MMC processing, 2) to extend previous energetic analysis of mass transport phenomena to wetting behavior between liquid metal and the quasi-solid like skin resulting from the presolidification of liquid on nonstoichiometric solids on a scale of interatomic distance, and 3) to provide experimental verification of our concept.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Nowok, Jan W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A practical microgripper by fine alignment, eutectic bonding and SMA actuation

Description: A silicon microgripper with a large gripping force, a relatively rigid structural body, and flexibility in functional design is presented. The actuation is generated by Ni-Ti-Cu shape memory alloy (SMA) films and the stress induced can deflect each side of the microgripper up to 55 {mu}m for a total gripping motion of 110 {mu}m. When fully open, the force exerted by the film corresponds to a 40 mN gripping force on the tip of the gripper.
Date: April 21, 1995
Creator: Lee, A. P.; Ciarlo, D. R. & Krulevitch, P. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Degradation mode surveys of high performance candidate container materials

Description: Corrosion resistant materials are being considered for the metallic barrier of the Yucca Mountain Project`s high-level radioactive waste disposal containers. Nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys and titanium alloys have good corrosion resistance properties and are considered good candidates for the metallic barrier. The localized corrosion phenomena, pitting and crevice corrosion, are considered as potentially limiting for the barrier lifetime. An understanding of the mechanisms of localized corrosion and of how various parameters affect it will be necessary for adequate performance assessment of candidate container materials. Examples of some of the concerns involving localized corrosion are discussed. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and concentration of halide species, on localized corrosion are given. In addition, concerns about aging of the protective oxide layer in the expected service temperature range (50 to 250{degree}C) are presented. Also some mechanistic considerations of localized corrosion are given. 45 refs., 1 tab.
Date: December 1, 1990
Creator: Gdowski, G.E. & McCright, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First-principles study of intermetallic phase stability in the ternary Ti-Al-Nb alloy system

Description: The stability of bcc-based phases in the Ti-Al-Nb alloy system has been studied from first-principles using a combination of ab-initio total energy and cluster variation method (CVM) calculations. Total energies have been computed for 18 binary and ternary bcc superstructures in order to determine low temperature ordering tendencies. From the results of these calculations a set of effective cluster interaction parameters have been derived. These interaction parameters are required input for CVM computations of alloy thermodynamic properties. The CVM has been used to study the effect of composition on finite-temperature ordering tendencies and site preferences for bcc-based phases. Strong ordering tendencies are observed for binary Nb-Al and Ti-Al bcc phases as well as for ternary alloys with compositions near Ti{sub 2}AlNb. For selected superstructures we have also analyzed structural stabilities with respect to tetragonal distortions which transform the bcc into an fcc lattice. Instabilities with respect to such distortions are found to exist for binary but not ternary bcc compounds.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Asta, M.; Ormeci, A.; Wills, J.M. & Albers, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructural examination of irradiated V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti.

Description: Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%) Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the EBR-II X530 experiment to 4.5 dpa at {approximately}400 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950-1125 C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations. Analytical investigations successfully demonstrated that the precipitates were enriched in titanium, depleted in vanadium and contained no nitrogen. These results are discussed in terms of future alloy development options.
Date: May 4, 1998
Creator: Gelles, D. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Contribution 1994 Summary Report Task T12: Compatibility and irradiation testing of vanadium alloys

Description: Vanadium alloys exhibit important advantages as a candidate structural material for fusion first wall/blanket applications. These advantages include fabricability, favorable safety and environmental features, high temperature and high wall load capability, and long lifetime under irradiation. Vanadium alloys with (3-5)% chromium and (3-5)% titanium appear to offer the best combination of properties for first wall/blanket applications. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is recommended as the reference composition for the ITER application. This report provides a summary of the R&D conducted during 1994 in support of the ITER Engineering Design Activity. Progress is reported for Vanadium Alloy Production, Welding, Physical Properties, Baseline Mechanical Properties, Corrosion/Compatibility, Neutron Irradiation Effects, Helium Transmutation Effects on Irradiated Alloys, and the Status of Irradiation Experiments. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports from this publication.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Smith, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stress corrosion cracking of Ni-base and Ti alloys under controlled potential

Description: Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy C-22 and Ti Gr-12, two candidate alloys for the inner-container of the multi-barrier nuclear waste package, was evaluated by using the slow-strain-rate (SSR) test technique in a deaerated acidic brine (pH {approx} 2.70) at 90 C. The strain rate used was 3.3 x 10{sup {minus}6} sec{sup {minus}1}. Prior to being tested in the acidic brine, specimens of each alloy were pulled inside the test chamber in the dry condition at room temperature (RT). Then specimens were exposed to the test solution while being strained under different controlled electrochemical potentials. The magnitude of the controlled potential was selected based on the corrosion potential measured in the test solution prior to straining of the specimen. Results indicate that, for Ti Gr-12, the times to failure were significantly shorter compared to those for alloy C-22. Furthermore, Ti Gr-12 showed reduced ductility in terms of percent reduction in area and true fracture stress, as the controlled potential became more cathodic. Results also indicate that the time-to-failure and percent elongation reached the minimum values when Ti Gr-12 was tested under impressed potential of {minus}1162 mV. Finally, metallographic examination was performed to evaluate the primary fracture, and the secondary cracking, if any, along the gage section of the broken tensile specimen.
Date: October 22, 1998
Creator: Estill, J C; Gordon, S R; Logeteta, L F & Roy, A K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effect of Ramp Rate on the C49 to C54 Titanium Disilicide Phase Transformation from Ti and Ti(Ta)

Description: The C49 to C54 TiSi{sub 2} transformation temperature is shown to be reduced by increasing the ramp rate during rapid thermal processing and this effect is more pronounced for thinner initial Ti and Ti(Ta) films. Experiments were performed on blanket wafers and on wafers that had patterned polycrystalline Si lines with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sidewall spacers. Changing the ramp rate caused no change in the transformation temperature for 60 nm blanket Ti films. For blanket Ti films of 25 or 40 nm, however, increasing the ramp rate from 7 to 180 C/s decreased the transformation temperature by 15 C. Studies of patterned lines indicate that sheet resistance of narrow lines is reduced by increased ramp rates for both Ti and Ti(Ta) films, especially as the linewidths decrease below 0.4 {micro}m. This improvement is particularly pronounced for the thinnest Ti(Ta) films, which exhibited almost no linewidth effect after being annealed with a ramp rate of 75 C/s.
Date: September 22, 1999
Creator: BAILEY, GLENN A.; HU, YAO ZHI; SMITH, PAUL M. & TAY, SING PIN
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department