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Radioecological Studies of the Hudson River

Description: "This report summarizes the results of the Hudson River radioecological studies conducted in 1973" (p. 1). The study investigates the behavior of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the Hudson River and the accumulation of natural alpha-emitting radionuclides.
Date: 1973
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ecological Studies of the Hudson River Near Indian Point

Description: "The general purpose of [this study is] to determine the ecological responses of the [Hudson] River to various classes of potential pollutants, so that the discharge of waste heat and radionuclides from the Indian Point Power Plant can be evaluated in context with these" (p. 1).
Date: April 1971
Creator: New York University. Medical Center. Institute of Environmental Medicine.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparison of the Bioavailability of Waste Laden Soils Using ''In Vivo'' ''In Vitro'' Analytical Methodology and Bioaccessibility of Radionuclides for Refinement of Exposure/Dose Estimates

Description: The bioavailability of soil contaminants can be measured using in vitro or in vivo techniques. Since there was no standard method for intercomparison among laboratories, we compared two techniques for bioavailability estimation: in vitro dissolution and in vivo rat feeding model for a NIST-traceable soil material. Bioaccessibility was measured using a sequential soil extraction in synthetic analogues of human saliva, gastric and intestinal fluids. Bioavailability was measured in Sprague Dawley rats by determining metal levels in the major organs and urine, feces, and blood. Bioaccessibility was found to be a good indicator of relative metal bioavailability. Results are presented from bioaccessible experiments with Cesium in contaminated DOE soils, and total alpha and beta bioaccessibility. The results indicate that the modified methodology for bioaccessibility can be used for specific radionuclide analysis.
Date: September 15, 1999
Creator: Lioy, P. J.; Gallo, M.; Georgopoulos, P.; Tate, R. & Buckley, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Initial recommendations for restricting gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of radionuclides for on-site inspections

Description: The US paper �Radionuclide Sampling, Sample Handling and Analytical Laboratory Equipment for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspections,� CTBT/PC/V/OSI/WSII/PR/29 identified the radionuclides of interest to an OS1 as <sup>144</sup>Ce, <sup>147</sup>Nd, <sup>141</sup>Ce, <sup>149</sup>Ba<sup>140</sup>La), <sup>95</sup> Zr(<sup>95</sup>Nb), <sup>131m</sup>Xe, <sup>133m</sup>Xe, <sup>133g</sup>Xe, <sup>135g</sup>Xe, and <sup>37</sup>Ar. All of these nuclides (except <sup>37</sup>Ar) can be measured via some form of conventional or coincidence-based gamma-ray spectrometry. The non-gaseous radionuclides [<sup>144</sup>Ce, <sup>147</sup>Nd, <sup>141</sup>Ce, <sup>140</sup>Ba(<sup>140</sup>La), and <sup>95</sup>Zr(<sup>95</sup>Nb)] can be measured via conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a shielded, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The gaseous radionuclides <sup>131m</sup>Xe, <sup>133m</sup>Xe, <sup>133g</sup>Xe, and <sup>135g</sup>Xe are best measured (after separation from their homologous elements) via a gamma & beta/electron coincidence technique such as that described in CTBT/WGB/TL-11/5 which could utilize either a HPGe or low-resolution (NaI(TI)) gamma-ray spectrometer to detect the gamma-ray/x-ray and a plastic scintillator to detect the beta particle/electron from the decay of the various Xe isotopes. The US paper CTBT/PC/V/IOSI/WSII/PR/29 (and other papers) identified a need to limit the information that can be extracted from high-resolution gamma-ray spectra to ensure that only information relevant to an OSI is accessible. The term �blinding� has been used to describe the need to limit the information available to the Inspection Team from the high-resolution gamma-ray measurement. A better term is �measurement restriction�; the need for restricting the information is particularly relevant to conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry measurements, but not to the gamma & beta/electron coincidence-type measurements envisioned for Xe isotopes because the separation process for these radionuclides will likely eliminate any other observables. The purpose of this paper is to define functional requirements for restricting measurements via conventional high- resolution gamma-ray spectrometry systems to ensure that only the nuclides of interest to an OSI can be identified and quantified. Options discussed below include 1) acquisition and analysis of the entire high-resolution gamma-ray spectrum combined with ...
Date: November 6, 1998
Creator: Buckley, W. F.; Kreek, S. A. & Wild, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Humic Substances in Natural Waters and their Complexation with Trace Metals and Radionuclides : a Review

Description: Section I introduces the material contained in the rest of the report. Section II presents the origin and characteristics of humic materials as we understand them today and outlines the methods that have been used to separate and analyze these substances. Section III focuses on the general problem of metal-organic interactions and treats some of the factors that are important in chelating and complexing of metal ions by humic substances. Section IV deals specifically with the complexing of radionuclides by organic substances, treated from the standpoint of both empirical and experimental studies.
Date: July 1985
Creator: Boggs, Sam; Livermore, David & Seitz, Martin G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

Description: This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.
Date: May 1, 1999
Creator: Abbott, M. L.; Keck, K. N.; Schindler, R. E.; VanHorn, R. L.; Hampton, N. L. & Heiser, M. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis and characterization of a new microporous cesium silicotitanate (SNL-B) molecular sieve

Description: Ongoing hydrothermal Cs-Ti-Si-O-H{sub 2}O phase investigations has produced several new ternary phases including a novel microporous Cs-silicotitanate molecular sieve, SNL-B with the approximate formula of Cs{sub 3}TiSi{sub 3}O{sub 9.5}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O. SNL-B is only the second molecular sieve Cs-silicotitanate phase reported to have been synthesized by hydrothermal methods. Crystallites are very small (0.1 x 2 microns) with a blade-like morphology. SNL-B is confirmed to be a 3-dimensional molecular sieve by a variety of characterization techniques (N{sub 2} adsorption, ion exchange, water adsorption/desorption, solid state CP-MAS NMR). SNL-B is able to desorb and adsorb water from its pores while retaining its crystal structure and exchanges Cs cations readily. Additional techniques were used to describe fundamental properties (powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, {sup 29}Si and {sup 133}/Cs MAS NMR, DTA, SEM/EDS, ion selectivity, and radiation stability). The phase relationships of metastable SNL-B to other hydrothermally synthesized Cs-Ti-Si-O-H{sub 2}O phases are discussed, particularly its relationship to a Cs-silicotitanate analogue of pharmacosiderite, and a novel condensed phase, a polymorph of Cs{sub 2}TiSi{sub 6}O{sub 15}(SNL-A).
Date: March 20, 2000
Creator: NYMAN,MAY D.; GU,B.X.; WANG,L.M.; EWING,R.C. & NENOFF,TINA M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Quality-Assurance/Quality-Control Data Collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from Wells and Springs between the Southern Boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1989 through 1995

Description: The U.S. Geological (USGS) and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected and analyzed water samples to monitor the water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho. Concurrently, replicate samples and blank samples were collected and analyzed as part of the quality-assurance/quality-control program. Samples were analyzed from inorganic constituents, gross radioactivity and radionuclides, organic constituents, and stable isotopes. To evaluate the precision of field and laboratory methods, analytical results of the water-quality and replicate samples were compared statistically for equivalence on the basis of the precision associated with each result. Statistical comparisons of the data indicated that 95 percent of the results of the replicate pairs were equivalent. Blank-sample analytical results indicated th at the inorganic blank water and volatile organic compound blank water from the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory and the distilled water from the Idaho Department of Water Resources were suitable for blanks; blank water from other sources was not. Equipment-blank analytical results were evaluated to determine if a bias had been introduced and possible sources of bias. Most equipment blanks were analyzed for trace elements and volatile organic compounds; chloroform was found in one equipment blank. Two of the equipment blanks were prepared after collection and analyses of the water-quality samples to determine whether contamination had been introduced during the sampling process. Results of one blank indicated that a hose used to divert water away from pumps and electrical equipment had contaminated the samples with some volatile organic compounds. Results of the other equipment blank, from the apparatus used to filter dissolved organic carbon samples, indicated that the filtering apparatus did not affect water-quality samples.
Date: October 1, 1998
Creator: Williams, L. M.; Bartholomay, R. C. & Campbell, L. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report; Reports of the Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction, Vol. 7

Description: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel of individuals appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. The panel requested that the principal investigator for the project prepare the following report, ''Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction Project Summary Report,'' to serve the following purposes: (1) summarize in a single, less technical report, the methods and results of the various investigations that comprised the Phase II of the dose reconstruction; (2) describe the systematic searching of classified and unclassified historical records that was a vital component of the project; and (3) summarize the less detailed, screening-level assessments that were performed to evaluate the potential health significance of a number of materials, such a uranium, whose priority did not require a complete dose reconstruction effort. This report describes each major step of the dose reconstruction study: (1) the review of thousands of historical records to obtain information relating to past operations at each facility; (2) estimation of the quantity and timing of releases of radioiodines from X-10, of mercury from Y-12, of PCB's from all facilities, and of cesium-137 and other radionuclides from White Oak Creek; (3) evaluation of the routes taken by these contaminants through the environment to nearby populations; and (4) estimation of doses and health risks to exposed groups. Calculations found the highest excess cancer risks for a female born in 1952 who drank goat milk; the highest non-cancer health risk was for children in a farm family exposed to PCBs in and ...
Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: Widner, Thomas E. & al., et.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Contaminant Transport using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria - Final Report - 05/01/1997 - 04/30/2001

Description: The interactions of mixed wastes containing radionuclides with solid rock surface and the mobility of the radionuclides in aquifer systems depend not only on the chemistry of the nuclides and the physico-chemical effects of radioactive decay, but also on the site-specific hydrogeology. Thus, to characterize contaminant transport, it is best to cross-check figures derived from any small-scale laboratory experiments over limited times with that obtained from field-oriented, natural analog studies. We propose such a study using the naturally-occurring U and Th decay-series disequilibria. The work of ours and other researchers have shown that the parent/daughter disequilibrium patterns existing in groundwater systems can be modeled in terms of local nuclide mass balance to arrive at such information as the rock-water contact time (fluid flow) and rates of contaminant transport, taking into account the retardation effect due to nuclide/rock interaction contaminants at INEL by grouping them into three categories, represented by isotopes of (1) Th and Pa, (2) U and (3) Ra. Mass spectrometric measurements of these elements will be emphasized in order to minimize sample size requirements and to maximize precision. Results will form the data base for a model code for computing: (1) Fluid residence time (transport rates) in the basalt aquifers at various locations, (2) The in-situ adsorption and desorption rate constants, as well as the retardation factors, of various radionuclide wastes, and (3) Rock dissolution rate and its relation to preferential flow and contamination transport in the fractured rock.
Date: April 30, 2001
Creator: Murrell, Michael T. & Ku, Teh-Lung
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrologic and Meteorological Data for an Unsaturdated-Zone Study Area near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1990-96

Description: Trenches and pits at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (formerly known as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) have been used for burial of radioactive waste since 1952. In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, began a multi-phase study of the geohydrology of the RWMC to provide a basis for estimating the extent of and the potential for migration of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste trenches and pits. This phase of the study provides hydrologic and meteorological data collected at a designated test trench area adjacent to the northern boundary of the RWMC SDA from 1990 through 1996. The test trench area was constructed by the USGS in 1985. Hydrologic data presented in this report were collected during 1990-96 in the USGS test trench area. Soil-moisture content measurement from disturbed and undisturbed soil were collected approximately monthly during 1990-96 from 11 neutron-probe access holes with a neutron moisture gage. In 1994, three additional neutron access holes were completed for monitoring. A meteorological station inside the test trench area provided data for determination of evapotranspiration rates. The soil-moisture and meteorological data are contained in files on 3-1/2 inch diskettes (disks 1 and 2) included with this report. The data are presented in simple American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format with tab-delimited fields. The files occupy a total of 1.5 megabytes of disk space.
Date: January 1998
Creator: Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R. & Pittman, John R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Removal of Radioactive Cations and Anions from Polluted Water using Ligand-Modified Colloid-Enhanced Ultrafiltration

Description: The purpose of this project was to develop, optimize, and evaluate new separation methods for removal of hazardous (radionuclides and toxic non-radioactive contaminants) metal ions from either ground water or aqueous waste solutions produced during Decontamination and Decommissioning operations at DOE sites. Separation and concentration of the target ions will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of material requiring disposal or long-term storage. The target metal ions studied were uranium, thorium, lead, cadmium, and mercury along with chromium (as chromate). The methods tested use membrane ultrafiltration in conjunction with water-soluble polymers or surfactants with added metal-selective chelating agents. Laboratory scale tests showed removal of 99.0-99.9% of each metal tested in a single separation stage. The methods developed for selective removal of radionuclides (UO22+, Th4+) and toxic heavy metals (Pb2+, Cd2+, Hg2+) are applicable to two DOE focus areas; decontamination of sites and equipment, and in remediation of contaminated groundwater. Colloid-enhanced ultrafiltration methods have potential to be substantially less expensive than alternative methods and can result in less waste. Results of studies with varying solution composition (concentration, acidity) and filtration parameters (pressure, flow rate) have increased our understanding of the fundamental processes that control the metal ion separation and colloid recovery steps of the overall process. Further laboratory studies are needed to improve the ligand/colloid recovery step and field demonstration of the technology is needed to prove the applicability of the integrated process. A number of graduate students, post-doctoral associates, and research associates have received training and research experience in the areas of separation science, colloid chemistry, and metal ion coordination chemistry of radionuclides and toxic metals. These scientists, some with positions in industry and academia, have the necessary background to address problems related to environmental remediation and. management. The results of this research show the technical feasibility of ...
Date: December 17, 2001
Creator: Scamehorn, Dr. John F.; Taylor, Dr. Richard W. & Palmer, Dr. Cynthia E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.
Date: September 1, 2000
Creator: Morton, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiological Assessment Survey of the Vance road Facility Source Vault Building Materials, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratory was the site of extensive nuclear medical research and involved the used of numerous radionuclides. These nuclides were stored in a source vault stored on the first floor of the facility. Nuclear medical research is no longer conducted in this facility, and the source vault was remediated in preparation for converting the area to office space and general use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault and its associated miscellaneous building materials and laboratory equipment in preparation for the conversion to general use space.
Date: September 1, 2000
Creator: Morton, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing

Description: Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) is a high pressure oxidation process that blends air, water, and organic waste material in an oxidizer in which where the temperature and pressure in the oxidizer are maintained above the critical point of water. Supercritical water mixed with hydrocarbons, which would be insoluble at subcritical conditions, forms a homogeneous phase which possesses properties associated with both a gas and a liquid. Hydrocarbons in contact with oxygen and SCW are readily oxidized. These properties of SCW make it an attractive means for the destruction of waste streams containing organic materials. SCWO technology holds great promise for treating mixed wastes in an environmentally safe and efficient manner. In the spring of 1994 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a Supercritical Water Oxidation Data Acquisition Testing (SCWODAT) program. The SCWODAT program provided further information and operational data on the effectiveness of treating both simulated mixed waste and typical Navy hazardous waste using the SCWO technology. The program concentrated on the acquisition of data through pilot plant testing. The Phase I DOE testing used a simulated waste stream that contained a complex machine cutting oil and metals, that acted as surrogates for radionuclides. The Phase II Navy testing included pilot testing using hazardous waste materials to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SCWO technology. The SCWODAT program demonstrated that the SCWO process oxidized the simulated waste stream containing complex machine cutting oil, selected by DOE as representative of one of the most difficult of the organic waste streams for which SCWO had been applied. The simulated waste stream with surrogate metals in solution was oxidized, with a high destruction efficiency, on the order of 99.97%, in both the neutralized and unneutralized modes of operation.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Garcia, K. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Contaminant Transport Using Naturally-Occurring U-Series Disequilibria

Description: Study the migration of nuclear waste contaminants in subsurface fractured systems using naturally occurring uranium and thorium-series radionuclides as tracers under in-situ physico-chemical and hydrogeologic conditions. Radioactive disequilibria among members of these decay-series nuclides can provide information on the rates of adsorption-desorption and transport of contaminants as well as on fluid transport and rock dissolution in a natural setting.
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: KU, TEH-LUNG
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, August 2002)

Description: This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Offices's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of 12 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at Test Cell C; the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Facility; the X-Tunnel in Area 25; the Pluto Disassembly Facility; the Pluto Check Station; and the Port Gaston Training Facility in Area 26. These CASs include: CAS 25-01-05, Aboveground Storage Tank (AST); CAS 25-02-02, Underground Storage Tank (UST); CAS 25-23-11, Contaminated Materials; CAS 25-12-01, Boiler; CAS 25-01-06, AST; CAS 25-01-07, AST; CAS 25-02-13, UST; CAS 26- 01-01, Filter Tank (Rad) and Piping; CAS 26-01-02, Filter Tank (Rad); CAS 26-99-01, Radioactively Contaminated Filters; CAS 26-02-01, UST; CAS 26-23-01, Contaminated Liquids Spreader. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 127 include radionuclides, metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Additionally, beryllium may be present at some locations. The sources of potential releases are varied, but releases of contaminated liquids may have occurred and may have migrated into and impacted soil below and surrounding storage vessels at some of the CASs. Also, at several CASs, asbestos-containing materials may be present on the aboveground structures and may be friable. Exposure pathways are limited to ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact (adsorption) of soils/sediments or liquids, or inhalation of contaminants by site workers due to disturbance of contaminated materials. Future land-use scenarios limit subsequent uses of the CASs to various nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. ...
Date: August 27, 2002
Creator: /NV, NNSA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

Description: The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.
Date: May 21, 2003
Creator: Marshall, D.W. & Soelberg, N.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calcite Precipitation and Trace Metal Partitioning in Groundwater and the Vadose Zone: Remediation of Strontium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides in Arid Western Environments

Description: In situ remediation is an emerging technology that will play an important role in DOE's environmental restoration program, and is an area where enhancement in fundamental understanding will lead to significantly improved cleanup tools. In situ remediation technologies have inherent advantages because they do not require the costly removal, transport, and disposal of contamination. In addition, these technologies minimize worker exposure because contaminated materials are not brought to the surface. Finally, these technologies will minimize the generation of secondary waste streams with their associated treatment and disposal. A particularly promising in situ remediation technology is bioremediation. For inorganic contaminants such as radionuclides and metals, in situ bioremediation can be used to alter the mobility or reduce the toxicity of radionuclides and metals by changing the valence state of the radionuclides and metals, degrading or producing complexing ligands, or facilitating partitioning on to or off of solid phases. The purpose of the research presented here was to explore microbially facilitated partitioning of metal and radionuclides by their co-precipitation with calcium carbonate. Although this approach is a very attractive cleanup alternative, its practical implementation requires improved scientific understanding of the geochemical and biological mechanisms involved, particularly with respect to rates and mechanisms of microbially facilitated calcite precipitation. Of interest for this investigation is the in situ manipulation of calcite precipitation by the microbially catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The production of ammonia during microbial decomposition of urea tends to drive pH upwards, and results in formation of alkaline conditions. When solution concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- are high enough, calcium carbonate precipitation may occur. A series of water samples collected from four wells tapping the aquifer underlying Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) all tested positively for the presence of urea degrading ...
Date: April 12, 2003
Creator: Ferris, F. Grant
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

Description: The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.
Date: May 21, 2003
Creator: Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R. & Shaber, K.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decontamination of Radionuclides from Concrete During and After Thermal Treatment

Description: The objective was to clarify from the theoretical viewpoint the mechanical, diffusional, thermodynamic and electromagnetic aspects of the decontaminations problem, by means of developing a powerful computational model to evaluate the effect of a very rapid heating regime on the on the contaminated concrete walls or slabs. The practical objective was to assess the feasibility of the microwave heating scheme envisaged and determine its suitable parameters such as power and duration. This objective was complementary to, but separate from, the chemical and nuclear aspects of long-time processes that led to the contamination and various conceivable alternative methods of decontamination which were investigated by Dr. Brian Spalding of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with whom the start-up phase of this project was coordinated.
Date: September 15, 1998
Creator: Bazant, Z. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PCGAP: Users Guide and Algorithm Description

Description: PCGAP is a software package, which was written to provide gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on a personal computer platform using the Windows NT operating system. It is a collection of programs, which provide a wide range of operability extending from the single user environment to the general purpose counting room. Included in the package are necessary data structures and libraries used to compute quantitative radionuclide concentrations. PCGAP also contains techniques to decontaminate photopeak interferences; determine activity concentrations for radionuclides independent of their associated spectral photopeak size; and three methods to determine the energy scale of a spectrum. PCGAP performs a non-linear least squares fitting of a Gaussian function to spectral photopeaks. The fitting algorithm can fit up to five concurrent photopeaks using a common spectral background. The package includes a program that will automatically locate spectral photopeaks, fit them to a Gaussian fu nction, identify the radionuclides associated with the found photopeaks, and compute a net activity concentration, and for an 8K spectrum do it in less than 30 seconds on a reasonably configured PC. PCGAP also includes a program which allows the operator to manually (using mouse clicks) identify photopeak locations, fit limits and background positions, initiate a fit to the photopeaks and then display the resulting Gaussian function forms. This interactive display function is particularly useful to resolve or properly fit photopeaks with complex adjacent structure and for photopeaks that are near the limit of detection.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Killian, E.W. & Hartwell, J.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RWMC Performance Assessment/Composite Analysis Monitoring Report - FY-2002

Description: US DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV and the associated implementation manual and guidance require monitoring of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The Performance Assessment/Composite Analysis (PA/CA) Monitoring program was developed and implemented to meet this requirement. This report represents the results of PA/CA monitoring projects that are available as of September 2002. The technical basis for the PA/CA program is provided in the PA/CA Monitoring Program document and a program description document (PDD) serves as the quality assurance project plan for implementing the PM program. Subsurface monitoring, air pathway surveillance, and subsidence monitoring/control are required to comply with DOE Order 435.1, Chapter IV. Subsidence monitoring/control and air pathway surveillance are performed entirely by other INEEL programs - their work is summarized herein. Subsurface monitoring includes near-field (source) monitoring of buried activated beryllium and steel, monitoring of groundwater in the vadose zone, and monitoring of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Most of the required subsurface monitoring information presented in this report was gathered from the results of ongoing INEEL monitoring programs. This report also presents results for several new monitoring efforts that have been initiated to characterize any migration of radionuclides in surface sediment near the waste.
Date: September 30, 2002
Creator: Ritter, P.D. & Parsons, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department