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Methods for microbiological and chemical determinations of essential amino acids in proteins and foods.

Description: A compilation of the results of research in the development of microbiological and chemical methods for determining the presence of 10 essential amino acids in foods; also provides data on the content of amino acids in certain proteins and foods.
Date: January 1950
Creator: Horn, Millard J. (Millard Jacob), 1897-; Jones, D. Breese (David Breese), 1879- & Blum, Amos Edward, 1909-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fluorescence labeling and computational analysis of the strut of myosin's 50 kDa cleft.

Description: In order to understand the structural changes in myosin S1, fluorescence polarization and computational dynamics simulations were used. Dynamics simulations on the S1 motor domain indicated that significant flexibility was present throughout the molecular model. The constrained opening versus closing of the 50 kDa cleft appeared to induce opposite directions of movement in the lever arm. A sequence called the "strut" which traverses the 50 kDa cleft and may play an important role in positioning the actomyosin binding interface during actin binding is thought to be intimately linked to distant structural changes in the myosin's nucleotide cleft and neck regions. To study the dynamics of the strut region, a method of fluorescent labeling of the strut was discovered using the dye CY3. CY3 served as a hydrophobic tag for purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography which enabled the separation of labeled and unlabeled species of S1 including a fraction labeled specifically at the strut sequence. The high specificity of labeling was verified by proteolytic digestions, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectroscopy. Analysis of the labeled S1 by collisional quenching, fluorescence polarization, and actin-activated ATPase activity were consistent with predictions from structural models of the probe's location. Although the fluorescent intensity of the CY3 was insensitive to actin binding, its fluorescence polarization was notably affected. Intriguingly, the mobility of the probe increases upon S1 binding to actin suggesting that the CY3 becomes displaced from interactions with the surface of S1 and is consistent with a structural change in the strut due to cleft motions. Labeling the strut reduced the affinity of S1 for actin but did not prevent actin-activated ATPase activity which makes it a potentially useful probe of the actomyosin interface. The different conformations of myosin S1 indicated that the strut is not as flexible as several other key regions of myosin ...
Date: August 2007
Creator: Gawalapu, Ravi Kumar
Partner: UNT Libraries

Mutation of Polaris, an Intraflagellar Transport Protein, Shortens Neuronal Cilia

Description: Primary cilia are non-motile organelles having 9+0 microtubules that project from the basal body of the cell. While the main purpose of motile cilia in mammalian cells is to move fluid or mucus over the cell surface, the purpose of primary cilia has remained elusive for the most part. Primary cilia are shortened in the kidney tubules of Tg737orpk mice, which have polycystic kidney disease due to ciliary defects. The product of the Tg737 gene is polaris, which is directly involved in a microtubule-dependent transport process called intraflagellar transport (IFT). In order to determine the importance of polaris in the development of neuronal cilia, cilium length and numerical density of cilia were quantitatively assessed in six different brain regions on postnatal days 14 and 31 in Tg737orpk mutant and wildtype mice. Our results indicate that the polaris mutation leads to shortening of cilia as well as decreased percentage of ciliated neurons in all brain regions that were quantitatively assessed. Maintainance of cilia was especially affected in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Furthermore, the polaris mutation curtailed cilium length more severely on postnatal day 31 than postnatal day 14. These data suggests that even after ciliogenesis, intraflagellar transport is necessary in order to maintain neuronal cilia. Regional heterogeneity in the effect of this gene mutation on neuronal cilia suggests that the functions of some brain regions might be more compromised than others.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Mahato, Deependra
Partner: UNT Libraries

FTIR-ATR Characterization of Hydrogel, Polymer Films, Protein Immobilization and Benzotriazole Adsorption on Copper Surface

Description: Plasma polymerization techniques were used to synthesize and deposit hydrogel on silicon (Si) substrate. Hydrogel is a network of polymer chains that are water-insoluble and has a high degree of flexibility. The various fields of applications of hydrogel include drug release, biosensors and tissue engineering etc. Hydrogel synthesized from different monomers possess a common property of moisture absorption. In this work two monomers were used namely 1-amino-2-propanol (1A2P) and 2(ethylamino)ethanol (2EAE) to produce polymer films deposited on Si ATR crystal. Their moisture uptake property was tested using FTIR-ATR technique. This was evident by the decrease in -OH band in increasing N2 purging time of the films. Secondly, two monomer compounds namely vinyl acetic acid and glycidyl methacrylate which have both amine and carboxylic groups are used as solid surface for the immobilization of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Pulsed plasma polymerization was used to polymerize these monomers with different duty cycles. Initial works in this field were all about protein surface adsorption. But more recently, the emphasis is on covalent bonding of protein on to the surface. This immobilization of protein on solid surface has a lot of applications in the field of biochemical studies. The polymerization of vinyl acetic acid and glycidyl methacrylate were shown as successful method to attach protein on them. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Cu is one of the processes in the integrated chips manufacturing industry. Benzotriazole is one of the constituents of this CMP slurry used as corrosion inhibitor for Cu. Benzotriazole (C6H5N3) is a nitrogen heterocyclic derivative having three nitrogen atoms, each with an unshared pair of electrons, forming five-membered ring structure. This molecule coordinates with Cu atoms by loosing a proton from one of its nitrogen atom and thereby forming a film which is polymeric in nature that prevents further oxidation of Cu. ...
Date: December 2007
Creator: Pillai, Karthikeyan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Modeling wild type and mutant glutathione synthetase.

Description: Glutathione syntethase (GS) is an enzyme that belongs to the ATP-grasp superfamily and catalyzes the second step in the biosynthesis of glutathione. GS has been purified and sequenced from a variety of biological sources; still, its exact mechanism is not fully understood. Four highly conserved residues were identified in the binding site of human GS. Additionally, the G-loop residues that close the active site during catalysis were found to be conserved. Since these residues are important for catalysis, their function was studied computationally by site-directed mutagenesis. Starting from the reported crystal structure of human GS, different conformations for the wild type and mutants were obtained using molecular dynamics technique. The key interactions between residues and ligands were detected and found to be essential for enzyme activity.
Access: This item is restricted to the UNT Community Members at a UNT Libraries Location.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Dinescu, Adriana
Partner: UNT Libraries

Stretching the Flexible Myosin II Subfragment Using the Novel Gravitational Force Spectroscope, and the Uncoiling of S2

Description: Familial Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) causes ventricle walls to thicken and often leads to sudden death especially in adults. Mutations in the subfragment 2 (S2) of β-cardiac myosin are implicated in the genetic disorder. This S2 region is a coiled-coil rod region resulting from the dimeric form of myosin II. It has been proposed that an elastic quality allows normal S2 to absorb force during the powerstroke according to the sliding filament model. To test the flexibility of single molecules of S2 against levels of physiological force, the Gravitational Force Spectrometer (GFS) is being developed. This novel system employs a standard microscope on an equatorial mount that allows the spectrometer to be rotated freely in space. Stationary glass beads are attached to a microscope slide where the molecule is tethered between the stationary bead and a smaller mobile bead. The GFS is oriented so that the force of gravity can act on the mobile bead and so impart a small force to the tethered subfragment. Additionally, a video system in conjunction with ImageJ software makes a distance measurement of the molecule possible with a resolution of around 11 nm. The S2 can be stretched parallel or perpendicular to the coiled coil to elucidate different structural properties of the rod. This study is the first to show structural evidence that S2 in vertebrate skeletal myosin uncoils proportionally to physiological force loads. Because of this, the usefulness and promise of the novel GFS is highlighted, and the biological role of S2's flexibility can be directly commented on. If the dimer undergoes uncoiling at physiological force loads as shown, then it is reasonable to think that this might occur in nature in response to the stress of the powerstroke on a single molecule. This unwinding could be to absorb force as a mechanism to ...
Date: May 2010
Creator: Dunn, James W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Elicitation of Protein-Protein Interactions from Biomedical Literature Using Association Rule Discovery

Description: Extracting information from a stack of data is a tedious task and the scenario is no different in proteomics. Volumes of research papers are published about study of various proteins in several species, their interactions with other proteins and identification of protein(s) as possible biomarker in causing diseases. It is a challenging task for biologists to keep track of these developments manually by reading through the literatures. Several tools have been developed by computer linguists to assist identification, extraction and hypotheses generation of proteins and protein-protein interactions from biomedical publications and protein databases. However, they are confronted with the challenges of term variation, term ambiguity, access only to abstracts and inconsistencies in time-consuming manual curation of protein and protein-protein interaction repositories. This work attempts to attenuate the challenges by extracting protein-protein interactions in humans and elicit possible interactions using associative rule mining on full text, abstracts and captions from figures available from publicly available biomedical literature databases. Two such databases are used in our study: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and PubMed Central (PMC). A corpus is built using articles based on search terms. A dataset of more than 38,000 protein-protein interactions from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is cross-referenced to validate discovered interactive pairs. A set of an optimal size of possible binary protein-protein interactions is generated to be made available for clinician or biological validation. A significant change in the number of new associations was found by altering the thresholds for support and confidence metrics. This study narrows down the limitations for biologists in keeping pace with discovery of protein-protein interactions via manually reading the literature and their needs to validate each and every possible interaction.
Date: August 2010
Creator: Samuel, Jarvie John
Partner: UNT Libraries

Multiple domains in MtENOD8 protein including the signal peptide target it to the symbiosome

Description: Article presenting evidence from GFP fusion experiments that the MtENOD8 protein contains at least three symbiosome targeting domains, including its N-terminal signal peptide (SP).
Date: May 2012
Creator: Meckfessel, Matthew H.; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Plunkett, Michael; Dong, Qunfeng & Dickstein, Rebecca
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

How to Select Foods: [Part] 3. Foods Rich in Protein

Description: "This bulletin deals with food materials which are rich in protein and tells why the body needs this nutrient and how much is supplied by different foods. Since the protein foods include many of the more expensive foods in common use, and since an adequate supply of protein is essential to the growth and upkeep of the body, it is especially important for the housekeeper to know how much her family needs and to be able to choose the materials which, in her particular circumstances, will best provide the proper kind and amount." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Hunt, Caroline Louisa, 1865-1927 & Atwater, Helen W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Functional Assessment of the Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD Protein Demonstrates That It Is a High-Affinity Nitrate Transporter

Description: Article on the functional assessment of the Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD protein demonstrating that it is a high-affinity nitrate transporter.
Date: October 2012
Creator: Bagchi, Rammyani; Salehin, Mohammad; Adeyemo, O. Sarah; Salazar, Carolina; Shulaev, Vladimir; Sherrier, D. Janine et al.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Effects of High Altitude Exposure on Capillary Permeability

Description: Observations of decreases in plasma volume, shifts in plasma and lymph protein concentrations, and increases in capillary permeability at high altitude have been reported in the literature by several investigators. This investigation was begun in an attempt to elucidate the possible significance of these phenomena in future space exploration, and because of the lack of knowledge concerning the underlying mechanisms. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of exposure to hypobaric pressures on the capillary permeability to the normal plasma and lymph proteins.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Reaves, Troy Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries

Structure, Function, and Evolution in Proteins: Report of Symposium held June 3-5, 1968, Volume 1

Description: Report issued by the Brookhaven National Laboratory containing conference proceedings from the first three sessions of the Symposium in Biology, held June 3-5, 1968. It includes research and papers discussing developments in the structure, function, and evolution in proteins with tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: February 1969
Creator: Brookhaven National Laboratory
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Identification of Endogenous Substrates for ADP-Ribosylation in Rat Liver

Description: Bacterial toxins have been shown to modify animal cell proteins in vivo with ADPR. Animal cells also contain endogenous enzymes that can modify proteins. Indirect evidence for the existence in vivo of rat liver proteins modified by ADPR on arginine residues has been reported previously. Presented here is direct evidence for the existence of ADP-ribosylarginine in rat liver proteins. Proteins were subjected to exhaustive protease digestion and ADP-ribosyl amino acids were isolated by boronate chromatography.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Loflin, Paul T. (Paul Tracey)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Analysis of the Trypanosoma brucei Genome and Identification and Characterization of a Gene Family Encoding Putative EF-Hand Calcium-Binding Proteins

Description: The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei contains a family of antigenically related EF-hand calcium-binding proteins which are called the calflagins. Genomic Southern blots indicated that multiple copies of calflagin genes occur in T brucei. All of the copies were contained in a single 23 kb Xhol-Xhol fragment. Genomic fragments of 2.5 and 1.7 kb were cloned that encoded calflagin sequences. Two new members of the calflagin family were found from genomic clone sequences. The deduced amino acid sequences of the genomic clones showed the calflagin genes were arranged tandemly along the genomic fragments and were similar to previously described calflagins. The calflagin genes were related by two unrelated 3' flanking sequences. An open reading frame that was unrelated to any calflagin was found at the 5' end of the 2.5 kb genomic fragment. Each encoded protein (~24,000u) contained three EF-hand calcium-binding motifs and one degenerate EF-hand motif. In general, variability among the T. brucei calflagins is greater than related proteins in T. lewisii and T. cruzi. This variability results from amino acid substitutions at the amino and carboxy termini, and duplication of internal segments.
Date: May 1998
Creator: DeFord, James H. (James Henry), 1956-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Heat Shock Proteins in Ascaris suum

Description: Ascaris suum were exposed to a number of stressors, including heavy metals and both high (40°C) and low (18°C) temperatures. The 70kD and 90kD heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the different A. suum tissues were analyzed by Western blot and quantitated by Macintosh Image Program.
Date: August 1995
Creator: Chao, Sheng-Hao
Partner: UNT Libraries