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Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

Description: The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1989
Creator: Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L. & Triay, I.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report to Congress on reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

Description: In the Report of the House Committee on Appropriations (House Report No. 101-96) on the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act, 1990 (P.L. 101-101), the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) ``{hor_ellipsis} to submit a report within 60 days of enactment {hor_ellipsis} which describes in detail how the Department plans to respond to the Committee`s {hor_ellipsis} concerns dealing with endemic schedule slips, problems in management structure, and lack of integrated contractor efforts.`` This report has been prepared in response to the above-mentioned Congressional directive. It is based on a comprehensive review that the Secretary of Energy has recently completed of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The Secretary`s review has led to the development of a three-point action plan for restructuring the program. This plan is explained in this report.
Date: November 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the task force on radioactivation

Description: Estimates have been made of the residual radioactivation of the components of the SSC accelerator and detector complex. Such activation is caused by the loss of a small fraction of the proton beams being transported in the SSC accelerator system, by deliberate removal (dumping) of the beams and by particles created in the proton-proton collisions in the SSC storage rings. Existing methodology that has been successfully used to determine activation levels at other accelerator facilities has also been used to estimate the activation of SSC components in those cases where calculational methods may be applied. In addition, we have used measurements from existing accelerators, primarily the Fermilab and CERN accelerators, to provide the means to estimate activation for those cases in which calculational methods, such as Monte Carlo shower codes, are difficult to apply. We have also used these measurements to check the calculations from the shower codes where possible. We have estimated activation levels and dose rates, where possible, for the following components of the SSC: The abort dumps for both the storage rings and the elements of the injector system; beam Collimators and scrapers; magnets and other apparatus in the region of injection/extraction from one accelerator to another, target stations used to create test beams from the high energy booster; superconducting magnets in the high energy booster and the storage rings; and representative detector elements. We also briefly discuss aspects of handling or dismantling the components most significantly activated and the relevance to decommissioning of the SSC complex. A short description of the decommissioning of the Intersecting Storage Rings at CERN, the only pp collider that has been decommissioned, is included in this report.
Date: October 1, 1987
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 1

Description: In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization.
Date: May 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rail abandonments in the South and their effect on NWPA rail shipments

Description: The railroad industry will have a very critical role in the eventual shipping of commercial spent fuel and defense high-level waste as provided under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the 1987 amendments. The transport of spent fuel is expected to be accomplished by rail from 19 of the South`s 27 reactor sites to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository or possible monitored retrievable storage facility. The decline in total track availability, however, could significantly impact the federal government`s transportation program. Particularly the situation of continuing abandonments may limit rail opportunities at numerous reactor locations. Commercial nuclear reactor sites have the unfortunate problem of not being located on Class I railroad mainline tracks. The reactor sites are generally located in areas with limited rail traffic and thus vulnerable to rail abandonment procedures. The general deregulation of the railroad industry under the Staggers Act of 1980 also assisted in making rail abandonment, through the Interstate Commerce Commission, a rather simple and quick process. The effects of deregulation, however, have provided alternatives to abandonment. In particular, the Staggers Act has led to an enormous surge in the growth of short line and regional railroads. Such railroads have been able to effectively operate rail lines which Class I railroads found unprofitable. The short lines and regionals were also encouraged to competitively negotiate contracts directly with shippers. While these railroads may help reduce the number of abandonment applications, they may also represent higher shipping costs. The South has experienced a great number of abandonments since the 1960`s. Many of the abandonments have been significant in length and have affected areas near nuclear plants expected to ship by rail.
Date: February 1, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On the movement of a liquid front in an unsaturated, fractured porous medium, Part 1

Description: The primary aim of this paper is to present approximate analytical solutions of the fracture flow which gives the position of the liquid fracture front as a function of time. These solutions demonstrate that the liquid movement in the fracture can be classified into distinctive time periods, or flow regimes. It is also shown that when plotted versus time using a log-log scale, the liquid fracture front position asymptotically approaches a series of line segments. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run utilizing input data applicable to the densely welded, fractured tuff found at Yucca Mountain in order to confirm these observations. 19 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs.
Date: June 1, 1989
Creator: Nitao, J.J. & Buscheck, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fabrication and closure development of nuclear waste containers for storage at the Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository

Description: US Congress and the President have determined that the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is to be characterized to determine its suitability for construction of the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Work in connection with this site is carried out within the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for designing, developing, and projecting the performance of the waste package for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste. Babcock & Wilcox (B & W) is involved with the YMP as a subcontractor to LLNL. B & W`s role is to recommend and demonstrate a method for fabricating the metallic waste container and a method for performing the final closure of the container after it has been filled with waste. Various fabrication and closure methods are under consideration for the production of containers. This paper presents progress to date in identifying and evaluating the candidate manufacturing processes. 2 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1989
Creator: Russell, E.W.; Nelson, T.A.; Domian, H.A.; LaCount, D.F.; Robitz, E.S. & Stein, K.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the Task Force on Collision Hall Limitations

Description: The Task Force on Collision Hall Limitations met March 23--26, 1987, to obtain a greater understanding of the civil construction requirements for a large scale model SSC detector and to identify limitations, if any, on overall detector scale and individual detector components that may result from civil construction limitations. To this purpose the Task Force studied civil construction techniques and limitations for both deep sites and surface or near surface sites, developed limits and criteria for model detector assembly and servicing, developed a model detector assembly scenario, and estimated an overall schedule from initiation of the design of the experimental hall complex to the completion of the assembly of the model detector. Our conclusions apply only to facilities required to house experiments of the scale of the model detector studied. From our studies it is apparent that the experimental hall complex required for SSC-scale detectors can be constructed under a variety of assumptions regarding the eventual SSC site. There may be significant differences in the schedule and the cost of the experimental hall complex between surface and deep underground locations, with the deep underground, in general, being more expensive and requiring a longer time for construction. The difference in cost and schedule for the experimental facilities for housing the model detector between a surface site and a deep underground site may amount to $25M and two years.
Date: April 1, 1987
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2

Description: In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.
Date: May 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An assessment of issues related to determination of time periods required for isolation of high level waste

Description: A commonly held perception is that disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level waste presents a risk of unprecedented duration. The EPA requires that projected releases of radioactivity be limited for 10,000 years after disposal with the intent that risks from the disposal repository be no greater than those from the uranium ore deposit from which the nuclear fuel was originally extracted. This study reviews issues involved in assessing compliance with the requirement. The determination of compliance is assumption dependent primarily due to uncertainties in dosimetric data, and relative availability of the radioactivity for environmental transport and eventual assimilation by humans. A conclusion of this study is that, in time, a spent fuel disposal repository such as the projected Yucca Mountain Project Facility will become less hazardous than the original ore deposit. Only the time it takes to do so is in question. Depending upon the assumptions selected, this time period could range from a few centuries to hundreds of thousands of years considering only the inherent radiotoxicities. However, if it can be assumed that the spent fuel radioactivity emplaced in a waste repository is less than 1/10 as available for human assimilation than that in a uranium ore deposit, then even under the most pessimistic set of assumptions, the EPA criteria can be considered to be complied with. 24 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: June 1, 1989
Creator: Cohen, J.J.; Daer, G.R.; Smith, C.F.; Vogt, D.K. & Woolfolk, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

European organization for nuclear research

Description: The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) operated from 1971 to 1984. During that time high-energy physics experiments were carried out with 30 GeV colliding proton beams. At the end of this period the machine was decommissioned and dismantled. This involved the movement of about 1000 machine elements, e.g., magnets, vacuum pumps, rf cavities, etc., 2500 racks, 7000 shielding blocks, 3500 km of cables and 7 km of beam piping. All these items were considered to be radioactive until the contrary was proven. They were then sorted, either for storage and reuse or for radioactive or non-radioactive waste. The paper describes the radiation protection surveillance of this project which lasted for five months. It includes the radiation protection standards, the control of personnel and materials, typical radioactivity levels and isotopes, as well as final cleaning and decommissioning of an originally restricted radiation area to a free accessible area.
Date: September 10, 1987
Creator: Schoenbacher, H. & Tavlet, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers; Overview

Description: Three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys and three copper-based alloys are being considered as candidate materials for the fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The austenitic alloys are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and the high-nickel material Alloy 825. The copper-based alloys are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). Waste in the forms of both spent fuel assemblies from reactors and borosilicate glass will be sent to the prospective repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The decay of radionuclides will result in the generation of substantial heat and gamma radiation. Container materials may undergo any of several modes of degradation in this environment, including undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability; atmospheric oxidation; general aqueous corrosion; pitting; crevice corrosion; intergranular stress corrosion cracking; and transgranular stress corrosion cracking. Problems specific to welds, such as hot cracking, may also occur. A survey of the literature has been prepared as part of the process of selecting, from among the candidates, a material that is adequate for repository conditions. The modes of degradation are discussed in detail in the survey to determine which apply to the candidate alloys and the extent to which they may actually occur. The eight volumes of the survey are summarized in Sections 1 through 8 of this overview. The conclusions drawn from the survey are also given in this overview.
Date: June 1, 1988
Creator: Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D. & Kass, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Action description memorandum for the FY 1989 line item: Environmental, safety and health upgrades, Phase 2

Description: This ADM documents the evaluation of the potential environmental impact hazards from the Environmental, Safety and Health Upgrades, Phase 2, project. Environmental, Safety and Health Upgrades, Phase 2, project is a $6,500,000 Line Item project for FY 1989. ES and H Phase 2, is a portion of a continuing effort to protect the environment, neighbors and employees from any adverse effects caused by the development and production missions of EG and G Mound Applied Technologies. The three parts of ES and H Phase 2 include: (A) new piping to separate potable water from domestic and process water; (B) improvements in explosive storage facilities; and (C) upgrades of the fuel oil storage systems, including a new tank, the containment basin, and dike.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Adams, F.S.; Hunter, M.R. & Anderson, C.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report to Congress on the potential use of lead in the waste packages for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Description: In the Report of the Senate Committee on Appropriations accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act for 1989, the Committee directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the use of lead in the waste packages to be used in geologic repositories for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The evaluation that was performed in response to this directive is presented in this report. This evaluation was based largely on a review of the technical literature on the behavior of lead, reports of work conducted in other countries, and work performed for the waste-management program being conducted by the DOE. The initial evaluation was limited to the potential use of lead in the packages to be used in the repository. Also, the focus of this report is post closure performance and not on retrievability and handling aspects of the waste package. 100 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The influence of penetrating gamma radiation on the reaction of simulated nuclear waste glass in tuff groundwater

Description: Static leaching experiments have been performed to determine the influence of penetrating gamma radiation on the reaction of simulated nuclear waste glass in tuff groundwater at 90{degree}C. Both the leachates and the reacted glass monoliths were analyzed to characterize the reaction. Radiation was seen to acidify the leachates, but the high bicarbonate content of the groundwater prevented the pH values from dropping below 6.4. The glass reaction tended to raise the pH. Glasses based on SRL 165 black frit and PNL 76-68 glass compositions were leached. The SRL 165 type glasses were quite durable (as measured by the elemental mass loss after constant reaction times) and were unaffected by radiation. The PNL 76-68 glasses were much less durable, with the durability decreasing (after constant reaction times) as the exposure rate was increased. The primary effect of radiation is a lowering of the leachate pH which then affects the glass leaching rate. 9 refs., 5 figs.
Date: November 1, 1989
Creator: Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr. & Gerding, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

Description: The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.
Date: May 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-situ observation of the alpha/beta cristobalite transition using high voltage electron microscopy

Description: A high temperature water vapor phase is expected to persist in the vicinity of high level radioactive waste packages for several hundreds of years. The authors have begun an investigation of the structural and chemical effects of water on cristobalite because of its abundance in the near field environment. A high voltage transmission electron microscope (HVEM) investigation of bulk synthesized {alpha}-cristobalite to be used in single phase dissolution and precipitation kinetics experiments revealed the presence {beta}-cristobalite, quartz and amorphous silica, in addition to {alpha}-cristobalite. Consequently, this apparent metastable persistence of {beta}-cristobalite and amorphous silica during the synthesis of {alpha}-cristobalite was investigated using a heating stage and an environmental cell installed in the HVEM that allowed the introduction of either dry CO{sub 2} or a CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O vapor. Preliminary electron diffraction evidence suggests that the presence of water vapor affected the {alpha}-{beta} transition temperature. Water vapor may also be responsible for the development of an amorphous silica phase at the transition that may persist over an interval of several tens of degrees. The amorphous phase was not documented during the dry heating experiments. 20 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1989
Creator: Meike, A. & Glassley, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of liquid-water percolation in tuffs in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

Description: A surface-based borehole investigation currently (1989) is being done to characterize liquid-water percolation in tuffs of Miocene age in the unsaturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Active in-situ testing and passive in-situ monitoring will be used in this investigation to estimate the present-day liquid-water percolation (flux). The unsaturated zone consists of a gently dipping sequence of fine-grained, densely fractured, and mostly welded ash-flow tuffs that are interbedded with fine-grained, slightly fractured, non-welded ash-flow and ash-fall tuffs that are partly vitric and zeolitized near the water table. Primary study objectives are to define the water potential field within the unsaturated zone and to determine the in-situ bulk permeability and bulk hydrologic properties of the unsaturated tuffs. Borehole testing will be done to determine the magnitude and spatial distribution of physical and hydrologic properties of the geohydrologic units, and of their water potential fields. The study area of this investigation is restricted to that part of Yucca Mountain that immediately overlies and is within the boundaries of the perimeter drift of a US Department of Energy proposed mined, geologic, high-level radioactive-waste repository. Vertically, the study area extends from near the surface of Yucca Mountain to the underlying water table, about 500 to 750 meters below the ground surface. The average distance between the proposed repository and the underlying water table is about 205 meters.
Date: December 31, 1989
Creator: Kume, J. & Rousseau, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quarterly report on program cost and schedule

Description: This report is intended to provide a summary of the cost and schedule performance for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Performance data are presented for each of the major program elements. Also included in this report is the status of the Nuclear Waste Fund revenues and disbursements. This report includes project performance data reported through March 1989.
Date: July 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The EQ3/6 software package for geochemical modeling: Current status

Description: EQ3/6 is a software package for modeling chemical and mineralogic interactions in aqueous geochemical systems. The major components of the package are EQ3NR (a speciation-solubility code), EQ6 (a reaction path code), EQLIB (a supporting library), and a supporting thermodynamic data base. EQ3NR calculates aqueous speciation and saturation indices from analytical data. It can also be used to calculate compositions of buffer solutions for use in laboratory experiments. EQ6 computes reaction path models of both equilibrium step processes and kinetic reaction processes. These models can be computed for closed systems and relatively simple open systems. EQ3/6 is useful in making purely theoretical calculations, in designing, interpreting, and extrapolating laboratory experiments, and in testing and developing submodels and supporting data used in these codes. The thermodynamic data base supports calculations over the range 0-300{degree}C. 60 refs., 2 figs.
Date: July 1, 1988
Creator: Wolery, T.J.; Jackson, K.J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Bruton, C.J.; Viani, B.E.; Knauss, K.G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy changes in transforming solids. Continuation proposal for the period January 1--December 31, 1990

Description: This report describes work completed, work in progress, and work planned during the continuation of funding. Research is being carried out on the following: bonded inclusions are being treated as problems of a homogeneous body; the problem of two cavities or inclusions is being studied; the examination of non-classical transformations is leading to conservation laws in statics and dynamics with applications in fracture and defect mechanics; mathematical and physical modeling of damage in brittle solids is being performed; a theoretical and numerical study of subsonic interfacial waves in bonded piezoelectric dissimilar half-spaces has been completed; the study of which crystal classes are capable of admitting the so-called Type 3 transonic state in anisotropic elasticity is also complete; and wave studies will be extended into the supersonic regime. The authors also intend to complete a study of the general self-force on a 3-dimensional dislocation loop element in an elastic medium of arbitrary anisotropy, as this is currently a needed ingredient in modern fracture and damage mechanics and in the study of defects in integrated circuit materials.
Date: September 15, 1989
Creator: Herrmann, G. & Barnett, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Telecommunications Network Plan

Description: The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) must, among other things, be equipped to readily produce, file, store, access, retrieve, and transfer a wide variety of technical and institutional data and information. The data and information regularly produced by members of the OCRWM Program supports, and will continue to support, a wide range of program activities. Some of the more important of these information communication-related activities include: supporting the preparation, submittal, and review of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to authorize the construction of a geologic repository; responding to requests for information from parties affected by and/or interested in the program; and providing evidence of compliance with all relevant Federal, State, local, and Indian Tribe regulations, statutes, and/or treaties. The OCRWM Telecommunications Network Plan (TNP) is intended to identify, as well as to present the current strategy for satisfying, the telecommunications requirements of the civilian radioactive waste management program. The TNP will set forth the plan for integrating OCRWM`s information resources among major program sites. Specifically, this plan will introduce a telecommunications network designed to establish communication linkages across the program`s Washington, DC; Chicago, Illinois; and Las Vegas, Nevada, sites. The linkages across these and associated sites will comprise Phase I of the proposed OCRWM telecommunications network. The second phase will focus on the modification and expansion of the Phase I network to fully accommodate access to the OCRWM Licensing Support System (LSS). The primary components of the proposed OCRWM telecommunications network include local area networks; extended local area networks; and remote extended (wide) area networks. 10 refs., 6 figs.
Date: May 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost estimate of initial SSC experimental equipment

Description: The cost of the initial detector complement at recently constructed colliding beam facilities (or at those under construction) has been a significant fraction of the cost of the accelerator complex. Because of the complexity of large modern-day detectors, the time-scale for their design and construction is comparable to the time-scale needed for accelerator design and construction. For these reasons it is appropriate to estimate the cost of the anticipated detector complement in parallel with the cost estimates of the collider itself. The fundamental difficulty with this procedure is that, whereas a firm conceptual design of the collider does exist, comparable information is unavailable for the detectors. Traditionally, these have been built by the high energy physics user community according to their perception of the key scientific problems that need to be addressed. The role of the accelerator laboratory in that process has involved technical and managerial coordination and the allocation of running time and local facilities among the proposed experiments. It seems proper that the basic spirit of experimentation reflecting the scientific judgment of the community should be preserved at the SSC. Furthermore, the formal process of initiation of detector proposals can only start once the SSC has been approved as a construction project and a formal laboratory administration put in place. Thus an ad hoc mechanism had to be created to estimate the range of potential detector needs, potential detector costs, and associated computing equipment.
Date: June 1, 1986
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

209-E Upgrades

Description: Pacific Northwest Laboratory has initiated a review of the Safeguards and Security systems at the Critical Mass Laboratory with regards to determining appropriate upgrading actions that assure that an effective and efficient Safeguards and Security posture consistent with DOE-RL policies, procedures, and priorities is effected. As a result of this review, PNL has concluded that specific upgrades are required at CML that provide a demonstrated enhancement to the overall security posture of the facility and are based upon prudent expenditures of government funds. It was further concluded that additional recommended upgrades provide minimal improvement to the overall security system at a significant outlay of funds.
Date: February 4, 1985
Creator: Merrill, B. J. & DeMyer, J. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department