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Transpired Air Collectors - Ventilation Preheating

Description: Many commercial and industrial buildings have high ventilation rates. Although all that fresh air is great for indoor air quality, heating it can be very expensive. This short (2-page) fact sheet describes a technology available to use solar energy to preheat ventilation air and dramatically reduce utility bills.
Date: June 22, 2006
Creator: Christensen, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

Description: The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.
Date: June 1, 2006
Creator: Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K. & Muralidharan, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

"Radiative Closure Studies for Clear Skies During the ARM 2003 Aerosol Intensive Observation Period"

Description: The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sponsored a large intensive observation period (IOP) to study aerosol during the month of May 2003 around the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility (CRF) in north central Oklahoma. Redundant measurements of aerosol optical properties were made using different techniques at the surface as well as in vertical profile with sensors aboard two aircraft. One of the principal motivations for this experiment was to resolve the disagreement between models and measurements of diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance at the surface, especially for modest aerosol loading. This paper focuses on using the redundant aerosol and radiation measurements during this IOP to compare direct beam and diffuse horizontal broadband shortwave irradiance measurements and models at the surface for a wide range of aerosol cases that occurred during 30 clear-sky periods on 13 days of May 2003. Models and measurements are compared over a large range of solar-zenith angles. Six different models are used to assess the relative agreement among them and the measurements. Better agreement than previously achieved appears to be the result of better specification of input parameters and better measurements of irradiances than in prior studies. Biases between modeled and measured direct irradiances are less than 1%, and biases between modeled and measured diffuse irradiances are less than 2%.
Date: April 1, 2006
Creator: J. J. Michalsky, G. P. Anderson, J. Barnard, J. Delamere, C. Gueymard, S. Kato, P. Kiedron, A. McComiskey, and P. Ricchiazzi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Epitaxial Growth of Icosahedral Boride Semiconductors for Novel Energy Conversion Devices

Description: The chemical vapor deposition and properties of the boron-rich semiconductors B12As2 and B12P2 on 6H-SiC(0001) and silicon substrates were investigated. Crystalline, stoichiometric films were deposited between 1200 C and 1500 C using two types of reactants, hydrides (B2H6 and AsH3) for B12As2 and halides (BBr3 and PBr3) for B12P2. 6H-SiC proved to be the better substrate for B12As2 heteroepitaxy, in terms of the residual impurity concentrations. Films on Si substrates suffered from high concentrations of Si (up to 4at.%); in contrast, the Si and C concentrations in the B12As2 films deposited on 6H-SiC at 1300 C were at or below the detection limits of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The deposition temperature was significant as films deposited at 1450 C contained high residual C and Si concentrations (>1020 cm-3), probably due to the decomposition of the substrate. The hydrogen concentration in all B12As2 films was relatively high, with a minimum concentration of 3x1019 cm-3 in undoped B12As2. SIMS measurements showed that the hydrogen concentration was directly proportional to and tracked the Si concentration, reaching values as high as 3 x 1020 cm-3. The structural properties of the B12As2 films were characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The FWHM of typical high resolution x-ray rocking curves for the (333) peaks of the B12As2 films were 800 arcsec. The films are under tensile strain due the higher coefficient of thermal expansion for B12As2 than SiC. Rotational twins were present in B12As2 films deposited on (0001) oriented 6H-SiC substrates, as revealed by cross-sectional TEM and x-ray diffraction pole figures. While the c-plane 6H-SiC has six-fold rotational symmetry, rhombohedral B12As2 has only 3-fold symmetry (along its (111) axis), thus it randomly nucleates with two different in-plane orientations. The electrical properties of undoped and silicon-doped B12As2 deposited on semi-insulating 6H-SiC substrates were characterized ...
Date: January 3, 2006
Creator: Edgar, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupled Environmental Processes in the Mojave Desert and Implications for ET Covers as Stable Landforms

Description: Monolayer evapotranspiration (ET) covers are the baseline method for closure of disposal sites for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed LLW, and transuranic (TRU) waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The regulatory timeline is typically 1,000 years for LLW and 10,000 years for TRU waste. Covers for such waste have different technical considerations than those with shorter timelines because they are subject to environmental change for longer periods of time, and because the environmental processes are often coupled. To evaluate these changes, four analog sites (approximately 30, 1,000 to 2,000, 7,000 to 12,500, and 125,000 years in age) on the NTS were analyzed to address the early post-institutional control period (the youngest site), the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of LLW, and the 10,000-year period for TRU waste. Tests included soil texture, structure, and morphology; surface soil infiltration and hydraulic conductivity; vegetation and faunal surveys; and literature reviews. Separate measurements were made in plant undercanopy and intercanopy areas. The results showed a progressive increase in silt and clay content of surface soils with age. Changes in soil texture and structure led to a fivefold decline in saturated hydraulic conductivity in intercanopy areas, but no change in undercanopies, which were subject to bioturbation. These changes may have been responsible for the reduction in total plant cover, most dramatically in intercanopy areas, primarily because more precipitation either runs off the site or is held nearer to the surface where plant roots are less common. The results suggest that covers may evolve over longer timeframes to stable landforms that minimize the need for active maintenance.
Date: January 18, 2006
Creator: Shafer, D.; oung, M. Y; Zitzer, S.; McDonald, E. & Caldwell, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Resolution Sensor for Nuclear Waste Characterization

Description: Gamma ray spectrometers are an important tool in the characterization of radioactive waste. Important requirements for gamma ray spectrometers used in this application include good energy resolution, high detection efficiency, compact size, light weight, portability, and low power requirements. None of the available spectrometers satisfy all of these requirements. The goal of the Phase I research was to investigate lanthanum halide and related scintillators for nuclear waste clean-up. LaBr3:Ce remains a very promising scintillator with high light yield and fast response. CeBr3 is attractive because it is very similar to LaBr3:Ce in terms of scintillation properties and also has the advantage of much lower self-radioactivity, which may be important in some applications. CeBr3 also shows slightly higher light yield at higher temperatures than LaBr3 and may be easier to produce with high uniformity in large volume since it does not require any dopants. Among the mixed lanthanum halides, the light yield of LaBrxI3-x:Ce is lower and the difference in crystal structure of the binaries (LaBr3 and LaI3) makes it difficult to grow high quality crystals of the ternary as the iodine concentration is increased. On the other hand, LaBrxCl3-x:Ce provides excellent performance. Its light output is high and it provides fast response. The crystal structures of the two binaries (LaBr3 and LaCl3) are very similar. Overall, its scintillation properties are very similar to those for LaBr3:Ce. While the gamma-ray stopping efficiency of LaBrxCl3-x:Ce is lower than that for LaBr3:Ce (primarily because the density of LaCl3 is lower than that of LaBr3), it may be easier to grow large crystals of LaBrxCl3-x:Ce than LaBr3:Ce since in some instances (for example, CdxZn1-xTe), the ternary compounds provide increased flexibility in the crystal lattice. Among the new dopants, Eu2+ and Pr3+, tried in LaBr3 host crystals, the Eu2+ doped samples exhibited low light output. ...
Date: January 23, 2006
Creator: Shah, Mr. Kanai; Higgins, Mr. William & Loef, Dr. Edgar V. Van
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test

Description: The Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test measures the blade deflection along the span of the blade using simple off-the-shelf infrared security cameras along with blade-mounted retro-reflective tape and video image processing hardware and software to obtain these measurements.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Fingersh, L. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FUN WITH DIRAC EIGENVALUES.

Description: It is popular to discuss low energy physics in lattice gauge theory ill terms of the small eigenvalues of the lattice Dirac operator. I play with some ensuing pitfalls in the interpretation of these eigenvalue spectra. In short, thinking about the eigenvalues of the Dirac operator in the presence of gauge fields can give some insight, for example the elegant Banks-Casher picture for chiral symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, care is necessary because the problem is highly non-linear. This manifests itself in the non-intuitive example of how adding flavors enhances rather than suppresses low eigenvalues. Issues involving zero mode suppression represent one facet of a set of connected unresolved issues. Are there non-perturbative ambiguities in quantities such as the topological susceptibility? How essential are rough gauge fields, i.e. gauge fields on which the winding number is ambiguous? How do these issues interplay with the quark masses? I hope the puzzles presented here will stimulate more thought along these lines.
Date: January 26, 2006
Creator: CREUTZ, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Process R&D for CIS-Based Thin-Film PV: Final Technical Report, April 2002 - April 2005

Description: The primary objectives of this Shell Solar Industries subcontract are to address key near-term technical R&D issues for continued CIS product improvement; continue process development for increased production capacity; develop processes capable of significantly contributing to DOE 2020 PV shipment goals; advance mid- and longer-term R&D needed by industry for future product competitiveness including improving module performance, decreasing production process costs per watt produced, and improving reliability; and perform aggressive module lifetime R&D directed at developing packages that address the DOE goal for modules that will last up to 30 years while retaining 80% of initial power. These production R&D results, production volume, efficiency, high line yield, and advances in understanding are major accomplishments. The demonstrated and maintained high production yield is a major accomplishment supporting attractive cost projections for CIS. Process R&D at successive levels of CIS production has led to the continued demonstration of the prerequisites for commitment to large-scale commercialization. Process and packaging R&D during this and previous subcontracts has demonstrated the potential for further cost and performance improvements.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Tarrant, D. E. & Gay, R. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Using Radar, Lidar, and Radiometer measurements to Classify Cloud Type and Study Middle-Level Cloud Properties

Description: The project is concerned with the characterization of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties by combining radar, lidar, and radiometer measurements available from the U.S. Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF). To facilitate the production of integrated cloud product by applying different algorithms to the ARM data streams, an advanced cloud classification algorithm was developed to classified clouds into eight types at the SGP site based on ground-based active and passive measurements. Cloud type then can be used as a guidance to select an optimal retrieval algorithm for cloud microphysical property retrieval. The ultimate goal of the effort is to develop an operational cloud classification algorithm for ARM data streams. The vision 1 IDL code of the cloud classification algorithm based on the SGP ACRF site observations was delivered to the ARM cloud translator during 2004 ARM science team meeting. Another goal of the project is to study midlevel clouds, especially mixed-phase clouds, by developing new retrieval algorithms using integrated observations at the ACRF sites. Mixed-phase clouds play a particular role in the Arctic climate system. A multiple remote sensor based algorithm, which can provide ice water content and effective size profiles, liquid water path, and layer-mean effective radius of water droplet, was developed to study arctic mixed-phase clouds. The algorithm is applied to long-term ARM observations at the NSA ACRF site. Based on these retrieval results, we are studying seasonal and interannual variations of arctic mixed-phase cloud macro- and micro-physical properties.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Wang, Zhien
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report for "Boron and Tin in Nuclear Medicien: The Development of Reactive Solid-State Reagents for PET and SPECT

Description: The research program was directed at the use of functionalized organometallic reagents that would rapidly react with radiolabeled agents generated by a medical cyclotron or reactor. The radioisotopes included fluorine-18, oxgygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11 and iodine-123; all short lived nuclides of importantce in nuclear medicine imaging studies utilizing emission tomography techniques. The early studies led to the development of extensive new isotope incorporation chemistry. These studies validated the feasibility of using reactive intermediates, such as the organoboranes, and acted as a catalyst for others to investigate organometallic agents based on mercury, tin, and silicon. A large number of radiolabeling techniques and radiopharmaceuticals were developed. These included agents for use in oncology, neurology, and metabolism. The research resulted in the generation of one hundred and one journal articles, eighty seven refereed published abstracts and forty one invited lectures. Thirteen postdoctoral students, fourteen graduate students, and twenty eight undergraduate students were trained in the scientific aspects of nuclear medicine imaging under the asupices of this grant.
Date: January 13, 2006
Creator: Kabalka, George W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THERMOBIFIDA FUSCA GENES INVOLVED IN PLANT CELL WALL DEGRADATION.

Description: Micro-array experiments identified a number of Thermobifida fusca genes which were upregulated by growth on cellulose or plant biomass. Five of these genes were cloned, overexpressed in E. coli and the expressed proteins were purified and characterized. These were a xyloglucanase,a 1-3,beta glucanase, a family 18 hydrolase and twocellulose binding proteins that contained no catalytic domains. The catalyic domain of the family 74 endoxyloglucanase with a C-terminal, cellulose binding module was crystalized and its 3-dimensional structure was determined by X-ray crystallography.
Date: January 23, 2006
Creator: Wilson, David B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tolerance of Three-Stage CIGS Deposition to Variations Imposed by Roll-to-Roll Processing: Final Technical Report, May 2003 - September 2005

Description: Three-stage co-evaporation of CIGS imposes stringent limits on the parameter space if high-efficient devices are to result. Substrate temperatures during the 1st stage (as well as during the 2nd and 3rd stage), Se partial pressure, and amount of Na supplied are critical for good nucleation, proper In-Ga-selenide precursor phase, and diffusion of Cu into the precursor, as well as diffusion of Ga through the film. In addition, the degree of Cu-rich excursion impacts maximum performance and process tolerance. Enveloping the above is the basic time-temperature profile inextricably linked to the metals delivery rates. Although high-efficiency, three-stage deposited CIGS devices on the R&D scale are grown at about 20-45 minutes to thicknesses of 2 to 2.5 m, the latter is not a viable approach for an economic manufacturing process. At Global Solar Energy, Inc., CIGS films are typically grown in about 6 minutes to thicknesses of less than 2 m. At the same time, the emissivity and thermal conductivity of stainless steel is vastly different from that of glass, and the reduced growth time poses restrictions on the substrate temperature ramp rates and diffusion of species (reaction kinetics). Material compatibility in the highly corrosive Se environment places limitations on the substrate heaters; i.e., substrate temperatures. Finally, one key advantage of a RTR deposition approach (compact equipment) restricts post CIGS Se exposure and cool-down rates to be vastly different than those practiced in the laboratory.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Beck, M. E. & Britt, J. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PREDICTION OF THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF COMPLEX FLUIDS

Description: ABSTRACT The goal of this research has been to generalize Density Functional Theory (DFT) for complex molecules, i.e. molecules whose size, shape, and interaction energies cause them to show significant deviations from mean-field behavior. We considered free energy functionals and minimized them for systems with different geometries and dimensionalities including confined fluids (such as molecular layers on surfaces and molecules in nano-scale pores), systems with directional interactions and order-disorder transitions, amphiphilic dimers, block copolymers, and self-assembled nano-structures. The results of this procedure include equations of equilibrium for these systems and the development of computational tools for predicting phase transitions and self-assembly in complex fluids. DFT was developed for confined fluids. A new phenomenon, surface compression of confined fluids, was predicted theoretically and confirmed by existing experimental data and by simulations. The strong attraction to a surface causes adsorbate molecules to attain much higher densities than that of a normal liquid. Under these conditions, adsorbate molecules are so compressed that they repel each other. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of experimental data, results of Monte Carlo simulations, and theoretical models. Lattice version of DFT was developed for modeling phase transitions in adsorbed phase including wetting, capillary condensation, and ordering. Phase behavior of amphiphilic dimers on surfaces and in solutions was modeled using lattice DFT and Monte Carlo simulations. This study resulted in predictive models for adsorption isotherms and for local density distributions in solutions. We have observed a wide variety of phase behavior for amphiphilic dimers, including formation of lamellae and micelles. Block copolymers were modeled in terms of configurational probabilities and in the approximation of random mixing entropy. Probabilities of different orientations for the segments were considered as order parameters and the free energy was written as a functional of these parameters. Imposing boundary conditions allowed us to apply ...
Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Donohue, Marc
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

Description: Control can improve wind turbine performance by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are implementing and testing state-space controls on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART), a turbine specifically configured to test advanced controls. We show the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in Region 3 using rotor collective pitch and reduce dynamic loads in Regions 2 and 3 using generator torque. These controls enhance damping in the first drive train torsion mode. We base these designs on sensors typically used in commercial turbines. We evaluate the performance of these controls by showing field test results. We also compare results from these modern controllers to results from a baseline proportional integral controller for the CART. Finally, we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J. & Balas, M. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optical Absorption, Stability and Structure of NpO2+ Complexeswith Dicarboxylic Acids

Description: Complexation of NpO2+ with oxalic acid (OX),2,2'-oxydiacetic acid (ODA), 2,2'-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and 2,2'-thiodiacetic acid (TDA), has been studied using spectrophotometry in1 M NaClO4. Both the position and the intensity of the absorption band of NpO2+ at 980 nm are affected by the formation of NpO2+/dicarboxylate complexes, providing useful information on the complexation strength, the coordination mode and the structure of the complexes.
Date: January 4, 2006
Creator: Tian, Guoxin & Rao, Linfeng
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydraulic Conductivity Distributions for Anisotropic Systems and Application to Tc Transport at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

Description: Abstract: At the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site a spill of radioactive Technetium has been migrating horizontally in the vadose zone rather than flowing vertically to the water table. This result has been interpreted as being due to horizontal anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity, K, (a tendency for fluids to migrate more easily in the horizontal direction) due to high horizontal connectivity of sedimentary deposits with a tendency for larger values of K. Such layers have larger components of silt and clay than the predominantly sandy soils at the Hanford site. It is generally accepted that effects of such anisotropy tend to be greater at smaller length scales, probably because of the lack of perfect correlations at large length scales. It has also been suggested that this anisotropy in K is maximized under relatively dry conditions when finer soils (with smaller pores) trap moisture more effectively than sands and gravels. The random component of the distribution of the Hanford flood deposits requires a probabilistic framework for the calculation of K. The work on this project had two main components: 1) to use continuum percolation theory applied to random fractal models to produce a general framework for calculating distributions of K under anisotropic conditions and as a function of system scale, 2) to apply the scheme for calculation to the Hanford site. The results of the general calculation (submitted for publication in Philosophical Magazine) are that the mean horizontal and vertical K values become equal in the limit of large system size (in agreement with general perception above) while the distributions of K values cause significant overlap of expected experimental values of K in the vertical and horizontal directions already at intermediate length scales. In order to make these calculation specific to the Hanford site, however, values of the ...
Date: January 6, 2006
Creator: Hunt, A. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Competing Phases and Basic Mechanisms in Strongly-interacting Electron Systems

Description: The goal of this work was to continue the effort to develop numerical tools in order to understand the properties of strongly-correlated electron materials. Towards this goal, they developed new stochastic series Monte Carlo techniques to study the phases of a two-dimensional quantum XY model with ring exchange in an external magnetic field. They determined the zero-temperature phase diagram of this model and found two quantum phase transitions. The first was between an XY-ordered phase and a striped valence-bond phase. The second was between the valence-bond phase and a staggered Neel antiferromagnetic phase. With the external field as an additional control parameter they were able to conclude that this system did not show a quantum spin liquid phase. They extended the study of the Xy model with ring exchange to study its behavior in the 3 dimensions. They find that in three dimensions, the superfluid phase persists to asymptotically large values of the ring exchange K. they do find exotic fractionalized phases in three dimensions. The role of the electron-phonon coupling in the cuprates remains open. They have studied the effect of an onsite Hubbard U Coulomb interaction on the electron-phonon vertex. They found that at strong coupling, Coulomb interaction caused the electron-phonon interaction to be suppressed at large momentum transfers leading to an effective peaking of the interaction in the forward direction while for weaker values of U, the electron-phonon interaction was simply suppressed at all q values. This behavior could favor d-wave pairing, although the effective pairing strength of the phonons remains weak in this model. The dynamics of the pairing interaction is reflected in the frequency dependence of the gap. They have used exact diagonalization to study the frequency dependence of the gap for a two-leg t-J ladder. They were able to determine both the real and ...
Date: January 17, 2006
Creator: Scalapino, Douglas J. & Sugar, Robert L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic Events

Description: Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. Whilst geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas. We have made significant progress toward understanding the origin and timing of chemical remagnetization related to burial diagenetic processes. For example, a recently completed field study documents a relationship between remagnetization and the maturation of organic matter (Blumstein et al., 2004). We have tested the hypothesized connection between clay diagenesis and remagnetization by conducting K-Ar dating of authigenic illites in units in Scotland and Montana with CRMs (e.g., Elliott et al., 2006a; Elliott et al., 2006b). We have also developed a fluid related model for alteration and remagnetization of Appalachian red beds that involves reduction and mobilization of iron phases by hydrocarbons and precipitation of authigenic hematite as a result of the introduction of meteoric fluid recharge (Cox et al., 2005). In addition, our recent studies of fluid-related CRMs along faults in Scotland provide information on the timing and origin of fluid flow events along the ...
Date: January 5, 2006
Creator: Elmore, Richard D. & Engel, Michael H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling

Description: Acceleration driven instabilities of fluid mixing layers include the classical cases of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, driven by a steady acceleration and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, driven by an impulsive acceleration. Our program starts with high resolution methods of numerical simulation of two (or more) distinct fluids, continues with analytic analysis of these solutions, and the derivation of averaged equations. A striking achievement has been the systematic agreement we obtained between simulation and experiment by using a high resolution numerical method and improved physical modeling, with surface tension. Our study is accompanies by analysis using stochastic modeling and averaged equations for the multiphase problem. We have quantified the error and uncertainty using statistical modeling methods.
Date: January 10, 2006
Creator: Glimm, James & Li, Xiaolin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation and Characterization of In-Line Annealed Continuous Cast Aluminum Sheet

Description: This R&D program will develop optimized, energy-efficient thermo-mechanical processing procedures for in-line annealing of continuously cast hot bands of two 5000 series aluminum alloys (5754 and 5052). The implementation of the R&D will result in the production of sheet with improved formability at high levels of productivity consistency and quality. The proposed R&D involves the following efforts: (1) Design and build continuous in-line annealing equipment for plant-scale trials; (2) Carry out plant-scale trials at Commonwealth Aluminum Corp.'s (CAC) plant in Carson; (3) Optimize the processing variables utilizing a metallurgical model for the kinetics of microstructure and texture evolution during thermo-mechanical processing; (4) Determine the effects of processing variables on the microstructure, texture, mechanical properties, and formability of aluminum sheet; (5) Develop design parameters for commercial implementation; and (6) Conduct techno-economic studies of the recommended process equipment to identify impacts on production costs. The research and development is appropriate for the domestic industry as it will result in improved aluminum processing capabilities and thus lead to greater application of aluminum in various industries including the automotive market. A teaming approach is critical to the success of this effort as no single company alone possesses the breadth of technical and financial resources for successfully carrying out the effort. This program will enable more energy efficient aluminum sheet production technology, produce consistent high quality product, and have The proposal addresses the needs of the aluminum industry as stated in the aluminum industry roadmap by developing new and improved aluminum processes utilizing energy efficient techniques. The effort is primarily related to the subsection on Rolling and Extrusion with the R&D to address energy and environmental efficiencies in aluminum manufacturing and will provide significant energy, environmental and economic benefits thus benefiting a broad cross-section of the aluminum industry. The results from this project will have ...
Date: January 17, 2006
Creator: Das, Dr Subodh K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

Description: A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new ...
Date: January 9, 2006
Creator: Das, Subodh K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FINAL REPORT: DOE-FG03-95ER25250

Description: The research conducted in this project concerns the geometry of extremal surfaces, embedded minimal surfaces in particular. The methods include geometric analysis, computational simulation, mathematical visualization and software development. Minimal surface research stands at the intersection of partial differential equations, calculus of variations, complex function theory and topology. Advances in this area are often---as is the case with our research---tied to the development and implementation of computational methods and tools of mathematical visualization. Understanding the structure of the space of minimal surfaces has been important in applications from cosmology to structural engineering, as well as other applied areas including polymer physics. The subject has benefited from the discovery of new examples by the use of computation, examples far beyond the range current theoretical construction techniques. Not only are these surfaces important for the understanding of equilibrium morphology via inter-material dividing surfaces, they arise in the study of grain boundaries and dislocations. These same examples are in turn signposts for the further theoretical development in mathematics. This research project has made fundamental advances in the study of equilibrium interfaces. Carrying on the parent project that was based at the University of Massachusetts, we have: Proved the existence of large families of periodic minimal surfaces that serve as models for compound polymers. Developed software to simulate the transmission electron microscopy of the nanostructure of block copolymers, and in the understanding of materials whose structure was previously not known. Pioneered the use of numerical approximation and image simulation for minimal and CMC surfaces in the theoretical investigation of these variationally define equilibrium interfaces. Developed and maintained an archival site and model libraries This website was one of the first such sites and has served as a model for others. We have proved the existence of an embedded minimal surface of genus one with ...
Date: January 10, 2006
Creator: Hoffman, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Save Energy Now

Description: This DOE Industrial Technologies Program brochure informs industrial audiences about Save Energy Now, part of ''Easy Ways to Save Energy'', a national campaign to save energy and ensure energy security.
Date: January 1, 2006
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department