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Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.

Description: The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.
Date: February 24, 1999
Creator: Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J. & Vogt, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental guidance regulatory bulletin

Description: In the July 19, 1988, Federal Register [52 FR 27290] the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a final rule that conditionally exempted waste samples used in small-scale treatability studies from regulation under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The final rule was intended to promote the development of new technologies for the treatment of hazardous wastes. However, in order to minimize danger to human health and the environment, it also imposed limitations and conditions on the amount of wastes that may be exempted from RCRA Subtitle C regulations for use in treatability studies. On July 7, 1993, EPA proposed amendments to the existing regulations that would increase the quantity limits for certain types of waste. In addition, EPA proposed to extend the period of time for which laboratories may conduct treatability studies involving bioremediation technologies from 1 year to 2 years. This bulletin summarizes the provisions of the revised rule.
Date: October 20, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Research Brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a Manufacturer of pressure-sensitive adhesive tape

Description: The Waste Minimization Assessment Center at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures three varieties of pressure-sensitive tape. The team report indicated that waste natural rubber adhesive is shipped offsite for disposal in large quantities, and that singificant cost savings could be achieved by redesigning the adhesive applicator on the coater for natural rubber adhesive. This research brief discusses the manufacturing process, existing waste management practices, pollution prevention opportunities, and gives additional recommendations. Tables summarize current waste generation and recommended pollution prevention opportunity.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

Description: The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.
Date: August 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

Description: Surface remedial action was completed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Canonsburg and Burrell Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1985 and 1987, respectively. The Burrell disposal site, included in the UMTRA Project as a vicinity property, was remediated in conjunction with the remedial action at Canonsburg. On 27 May 1994, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the DOE final Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1993) for Burrell thus establishing the site under the general license in 10 CFR {section}40.27 (1994). In accordance with the DOE guidance document for long-term surveillance (DOE, 1995), all NRC/DOE interaction on the Burrell site`s long-term care now is conducted with the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and is no longer the responsibility of the DOE UMTRA Project Team in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Therefore, the planned sampling activities described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) are limited to the Canonsburg site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring at the Canonsburg site for calendar years 1995 and 1996. Currently, the analytical data further the site characterization and demonstrate that the disposal cell`s initial performance is in accordance with design requirements.
Date: September 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of metal fasteners

Description: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988). That document has been superseded by the Facility Pollution Prevention Guide (EPA/600/R-92/088, May 1992). The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures various types of metal fasteners for automobiles, furniture, and appliances. Products are manufactured from steel, brass, copper, and aluminum wire and rod stock in two production lines-large part production and small part production. In large part production, header machines press wire stock into specific product shapes which are washed, machined, and in some cases heat-treated and polished. Small parts are manufactured from wire and rod stock in a series of machining operations, then washed, heat treated and polished, before shipment to an outside firm for surface finishing. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations indicated that a large amount of plant oil waste is shipped off-site for fuels blending and a significant quantity of oily sludge waste is shipped offsite for disposal as non-hazardous waste. Large cost savings can be achieved by the plant through the use of alternative methods of removing metal chips from parts, thereby reducing intermediate washings.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Jendrucko, R.J.; Coleman, T.N. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Research Brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of pharmaceuticals

Description: The Waste Minimization Assessment Center at Colorado State Univ. performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures intermediates for pharmaceuticals and other chemicals. Waste streams generated in the greatest quantities are waste solvents that are reused onsite, incinerated as fuel in an onsite boiler, or shipped offsite for disposal. The greatest cost savings could be achieved by reusing additional amounts of methylene chloride in the plant. This research brief discusses the process, existing waste management practices, pollution prevention opportunities, and gives additional recommendations. Tables summarize current waste generation and recommended waste minimization opportunities.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F. & Looby, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental guidance regulatory bulletin

Description: Under Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), a facility that meets or exceeds annual reporting thresholds, including the manufacture or process of any listed toxic chemical in quantities equal or greater than 25,000 pounds/year, or otherwise use of any listed toxic chemical in quantities equal or greater than 10,000 pounds/year, must submit a Form R report. On November 30, 1994, the US EPA promulgated a final rule that established an alternate reporting threshold of greater than 1 million pounds per year for manufacturing, processing, or otherwise using a listed chemical. If a facility subject to Section 313 reporting does not exceed this threshold, and if a facility`s total annual reportable amount does not exceed 500 pounds per year, then that facility may submit a certification statement for that chemical instead of the Form R report. The final rule will be effective for reporting on activities beginning January 1, 1995 pending Office of Management and Budget approval. Certification statements will be due each year with Form R reports on or before July 1 for the previous calendar year.
Date: April 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Critical comments on the US Environmental Protection Agency Standards 40 CFR 191

Description: This paper is about the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ``Environmental Standards for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Wastes,`` 40 CFR 191. These standards regulate the disposal of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories. Currently, two repository sites are under investigation: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, may become the repository for defense-generated transuranic waste (TRU); and the Yucca Mountain site, located near Las Vegas, Nevada, may become the repository for spent reactor fuel and a small amount of reprocessing waste (hereinafter called high-level radioactive waste or HLW). The paper was written for readers who have an interest in 40 CFR 191 but do not have the time or inclination to ponder the technical details.
Date: January 14, 1993
Creator: Pflum, C. G.; Van Konynenburg, R. A. & Krishna, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

Description: Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.
Date: January 16, 1998
Creator: Veil, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Guidance Document for Kentucky's Oil and Gas Operators

Description: This technical report is a summary of the accomplishments toward completion of ''A Guidance Document for Kentucky's Oil and Gas Operators''. During this quarter, the document received continued review and editing in an electronic format to satisfy the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Comments received from oil and gas operators reviewing this document prompted contact to be made with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U. S. EPA) to develop an addendum section to provide better explanation of U.S. EPA requirements for Class II injection wells in Kentucky. During May of this year the consultant hired to develop the Class II, UIC addendum section to the guidance document met a second time with the U.S. EPA and state personnel responsible for regulation of the Class II, UIC program in Kentucky, to review a draft of the document. This draft was discussed during the meeting with the U.S. EPA and will receive additional editing and comment during the next quarter.
Date: October 28, 1999
Creator: Rick, Bender
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon-14 releases from an unsaturated repository: A senseless but expensive dilemma

Description: The purpose of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR Part 191 or standards) is to protect public health and safety. The 1985 rule was developed on the basis of the assumption that the repository would be located in a geologic formation that lies below the water table. It is appropriate to examine gaseous releases and transport of pollutants in order to determine site adequacy. When the provisions of the 1985 standard are applied to Yucca Mountain, specifically the limits for carbon-14, we can release in 10,000 years no more than 7,000 curies of carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide. Meanwhile, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and others indicate that the repository may release about 8,000 curies of carbon-14 dioxide, an amount that exceeds the standard by 10 to 20 percent. The original basis of the 1985 standards was that, in a site below the water table, the limit for carbon-14 was technically achievable. It was not a standard based on a release level that would prevent a danger to public health. If we examine the danger to public health of the release of 8,000 curies of carbon-14 dioxide during and 8,000-year period, this release would not a pose a significant threat to the average individual. Industry and natural sources release many times this amount of carbon-14 dioxide each year. The question therefore becomes: is it appropriate to spend an additional $3.2 billion on waste packages when the expenditure does not measurably improve the public health?
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Pflum, C.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.

Description: The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.
Date: February 24, 1999
Creator: Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J. & Vogt, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

Description: This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; and (4) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Consolidation of the team of stakeholders; Move the site for the commercial demonstration to LTV Steel, Cleveland, Ohio; Permitting for new site; Site specific engineering; Cost update of the project as it relates to the Cleveland location; FETC update; DCAA audit; and Updated endorsement of Calderon process by Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA, Region 5.
Date: March 19, 1999
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparison of hydrogen vehicle storage options using the EPA urban driving schedule

Description: The three standard options for the storage of hydrogen fuel on passenger vehicles are compressed gas, metal hydride and cryogenic liquid storage. The weight of the hydrogen storage system affects the performance of the vehicle. We examine vehicle performance as a function of hydrogen storage system type and capacity. Three vehicles are modeled, a metro commuter, a mid size sedan and a full size van. All vehicles are powered by a fuel cell and an electric drive train. The impact of auxiliary power requirements for air conditioning is also examined. In making these comparisons it is necessary to assume a driving cycle. We use the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) urban dynamometer driving schedule in all simulations to represent typical urban driving conditions.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Daney, D.E.; Hill, D.D. & Edeskuty, F.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Site characterization plan thermal goals reevaluation

Description: The Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988) attempted to define surrogate criteria that could be used to establish potential repository performance. These criteria or SCP thermal goals were developed from knowledge existing at the time and, as a reference case, emphasized performance for waste emplacement in a vertical borehole. Since that time, new knowledge has become available and some additional analyses of thermal loading have been performed. Additionally, other emplacement modes such as in-drift emplacement are being considered to accommodate larger waste packages. New concepts such as ``extended hot`` are also being considered as possible methods to achieve improved waste isolation. Thus it became clear that the thermal goals established in the SCP should be reevaluated. A Working Group was formed to reassess the SCP thermal goals to determine whether each goal was still valid, if there were goals that needed to be added, and what if any effort was needed to reduce the uncertainty associated with a particular goal. The objectives of the effort were to: (1) provide thermal goals that would support the FY 1993 Thermal Loading Systems Study; (2) help focus the planned testing and analysis efforts; and (3) acquire data that potentially could be used to initiate a change to the project technical baseline. Sixteen thermal goals were evaluated; fifteen were from various sections of the SCP; one goal was added, and another was split into two to include in-drift emplacement. The group`s findings and recommendations are presented.
Date: September 8, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculations supporting evaluation of potential environmental standards for Yucca Mountain

Description: The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 801 (US Congress, 1992) provides for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to contract the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to conduct a study and provide findings and recommendations on reasonable standards for the disposal of high-level wastes at the Yucca Mountain site. The NAS study is to provide findings and recommendations which include, among other things, whether a health-based standard based on dose to individual members of the public from releases to the accessible environment will provide a reasonable standard for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The EPA, based upon and consistent with the findings and recommendations of the NAS, is required to promulgate standards for protection of the public from releases from radioactive materials stored or disposed of in a repository at the Yucca Mountain site. This document presents a number of different ``simple`` analyses of undisturbed repository performance that are intended to provide input to those responsible for setting appropriate environmental standards for a potential repository at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. Each of the processes included in the analyses has been simplified to capture the primary significance of that process in containing or isolating the waste from the biosphere. In these simplified analyses, the complex waste package interactions were approximated by a simple waste package ``failure`` distribution which is defined by the initiation and rate of waste package ``failures``. Similarly, releases from the waste package and the engineered barrier system are controlled by the very near field environment and the presence and rate of advective and diffusive release processes. Release was approximated by either a simple alteration-controlled release for the high solubility radionuclides and either a diffusive or advective-controlled release for the solubility-limited radionuclides.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Duguid, J. O.; Andrews, R. W.; Brandstetter, E.; Dale, T. F. & Reeves, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Federal agencies active in chemical industry-related research and development

Description: The Energy Policy Act of 1992 calls for a program to further the commercialization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies for the industrial sector.. The primary objective of the Office of Industrial Technologies Chemical Industry Team is to work in partnership with the US chemical industry to maximize economic, energy, and environmental benefits through research and development of innovative technologies. This document was developed to inventory organizations within the federal government on current chemical industry-related research and development. While an amount of funding or number of projects specifically relating to chemical industry research and development was not defined in all organizations, identified were about 60 distinct organizations representing 7 cabinet-level departments and 4 independent agencies, with research efforts exceeding $3.5 billion in fiscal year 1995. Effort were found to range from less than $500 thousand per year at the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior to over $100 million per year at the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and Health and Human Services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The total number of projects in these programs exceeded 10,000. This document is complete to the extent that agencies volunteered information. Additions, corrections, and changes are encouraged and will be incorporated in future revisions.
Date: September 29, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Requirements for controlling a repository`s releases of carbon-14 dioxide; the high costs and negligible benefits

Description: A repository excavated within the unsaturated zone may release carbon (C)-14 dioxide in amounts that exceed limits imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The release would not threaten the general population, but may expose some hypothetical maximally exposed individual to 0.0005 millirems/year. Yet a repository`s releases of C-14 dioxide are strictly regulated, perhaps unintentionally. The EPA and NRC regulations could force the Department of Energy to design and fabricate an expensive 10,000-year waste package solely for the sake of controlling releases of C-14 dioxide. This paper argues that the repository regulations should exempt releases of C-14 dioxide or at least impose more equitable limits. 21 refs., 1 tab.
Date: April 1, 1990
Creator: Park, U Sun & Pflum, C.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Validating the role of AFVs in voluntary mobile source emission reduction programs.

Description: Late in 1997, EPA announced new allowances for voluntary emission control programs. As a result, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Cities and other metro areas that have made an ongoing commitment to increasing participation by alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) in local fleets have the opportunity to estimate the magnitude and obtain emission reduction credit for following through on that commitment. Unexpectedly large reductions in key ozone precursor emissions in key locations and times of the day can be achieved per vehicle-mile by selecting specific light duty AFV offerings from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in lieu of their gasoline-fueled counterparts. Additional benefit accrues from the fact that evaporative emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (generated in the case of CNG, LNG, and LPG by closed fuel-system AFV technology) can be essentially negligible. Upstream emissions from fuel storage and distribution with the airshed of interest are also reduced. This paper provides a justification and outlines a method for including AFVs in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality, and for quantifying emission reduction credits. At the time of submission of this paper, the method was still under review by the US EPA Office of Mobile Sources, pending mutually satisfactory resolution of several of its key points. Some of these issues are discussed in the paper.
Date: March 17, 1999
Creator: Santini, D. J. & Saricks, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental guidance regulatory bulletin

Description: On September 22, 1993, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final Off-Site Rule, which defines criteria for approving facilities for receiving waste from response actions taken under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compentation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The primary purpose of the Off-Site Rule is to clarify and codify CERCLA`s requirement to prevent wastes generated from remediation activities conducted under CERCLA from contributing to present or future environmental problems at off-site waste management facilities. Even transfer facilities are required to be acceptable under the final rule before they can accept CERCLA waste. Because the decisions regarding the choice of the remedy for cleanup of a CERCLA site may depend on the acceptability of the receiving facility, the Off-Site Rule could affect both the schedule for cleanup as well as the array of feasible remedies from which to choose.
Date: December 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The formation of aromatics and PAH's in laminar flames

Description: The formation of aromatics and PAH's is an important problem in combustion. These compounds are believed to contribute to the formation of soot whose emission from diesel engines is regulated widely throughout the industrial world. Additionally, the United States Environmental Protection Agency regulates the emission of many aromatics and PAH species from stationary industrial burners, under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. The above emission regulations have created much interest in understanding how these species are formed in combustion systems. Much previous work has been done on aromatics and PAH's. The work is too extensive to review here, but is reviewed in Reference 1. A few recent developments are highlighted here. McEnally, Pfefferle and coworkers have studied aromatic, PAH and soot formation in a variety of non-premixed flames with hydrocarbon additives [2-4]. They found additives that contain a C5 ring increase the concentration of aromatics and soot [4]. Howard and coworkers have studied the formation of aromatic and PAH's in low pressure, premixed, laminar hydrocarbon flames. They found the cyclopentadienyl radical to be a key species in naphthalene formation in a fuel-rich, benzene/Ar/O2 flame [5].
Date: April 1999
Creator: Marinov, N. M.; Pitz, W. J. & Westbrook, C. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

Description: The Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is in McKinley County, New Mexico. As part of UMTRA surface remediation, residual radioactive materials were consolidated on the site in a disposal cell that was completed July 1995. The need for ground water monitoring was evaluated and found not to be necessary beyond the completion of the remedial action because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer is classified as limited use.
Date: August 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Good Practice Guide Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention

Description: This Good Practice Guide provides tools, information, and examples for promoting the implementation of pollution prevention during the design phases of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects. It is one of several Guides for implementing DOE Order 430.1, Life-cycle Asset Management. DOE Order 430.1 provides requirements for DOE, in partnership with its contractors, to plan, acquire, operate, maintain, and dispose of physical assets. The goals of designing for pollution prevention are to minimize raw material consumption, energy consumption, waste generation, health and safety impacts, and ecological degradation over the entire life of the facility (EPA 1993a). Users of this Guide will learn to translate national policy and regulatory requirements for pollution prevention into action at the project level. The Guide was written to be applicable to all DOE projects, regardless of project size or design phase. Users are expected to interpret the Guide for their individual project's circumstances, applying a graded approach so that the effort is consistent with the anticipated waste generation and resource consumption of the physical asset. This Guide employs a combination of pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) methods and design for environment (DfE) philosophies. The PPOA process was primarily developed for existing products, processes, and facilities. The PPOA process has been modified in this Guide to address the circumstances of the DOE design process as delineated in DOE Order 430.1 and its associated Good Practice Guides. This modified form of the PPOA is termed the Pollution Prevention Design Assessment (P2DA). Information on current nationwide methods and successes in designing for the environment also have been reviewed and are integrated into this guidance.
Date: October 14, 1999
Creator: Dorsey, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department