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Field Evaluations of Low-Frequency SAFT-UT on Cast Stainless Steel and Dissimilar Metal Weld Components

Description: This report documents work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on evalutating a low frequency ultrasonic inspection technique used for examination of cast stainless steel (CSS) and dissimilar metal (DMW) reactor piping components. The technique uses a zone-focused, multi-incident angle, low frequency (250-450 kHz) inspection protocol coupled with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The primary focus of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspection of coarse grained primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs).
Date: November 1, 2008
Creator: Diaz, Aaron A.; Harris, R. V. & Doctor, Steven R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test Results of LARP Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnets Using a Shell-based Support Structure (TQS)

Description: Among the magnet development program of a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade, six quadrupole magnets were built and tested using a shell based key and bladder technology (TQS). The 1 m long 90 mm aperture magnets are part o fthe US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) aimed at demonstrating Nb{sub 3}Sn technology by the year 2009, of a 3.6 m long magnet capable of achieving 200 T/m. In support of the LARP program the TQS magnets were tested at three different laboratories, LBNL, FNAL and CERN and while at CERN a technology-transfer and a four days magnet disassembly and reassembly were included. This paper summarizes the fabrication, assembly, cool-down and test results of the six magnets and compres measruements with design expectations.
Date: August 17, 2008
Creator: Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, C. R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fabrication and Test of LARP Technological Quadrupole Models of TQC Series

Description: In support of the development of a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, several two-layer technological quadrupole models of TQC series with 90 mm aperture and collar-based mechanical structure have been developed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBNL. This paper summarizes the results of fabrication and test of TQC02a, the second TQC model based on RRP Nb3Sn strand, and TQC02b, built with both MJR and RRP strand. The test results presented include magnet strain and quench performance during training, as well as quench studies of current ramp rate and temperature dependence from 1.9 K to 4.5 K.
Date: August 17, 2008
Creator: Bossert, Rodger C.; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nilolai; Barzi, Emanuela; Chlachidze, Guram; Feher, Sandor et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluating EUV mask pattern imaging with two EUV microscopes

Description: Aerial image measurement plays a key role in the development of patterned reticles for each generation of lithography. Studying the field transmitted (reflected) from EUV masks provides detailed information about potential disruptions caused by mask defects, and the performance of defect repair strategies, without the complications of photoresist imaging. Furthermore, by measuring the continuously varying intensity distribution instead of a thresholded, binary resist image, aerial image measurement can be used as feedback to improve mask and lithography system modeling methods. Interest in EUV, at-wavelength, aerial image measurement lead to the creation of several research tools worldwide. These tools are used in advanced mask development work, and in the evaluation of the need for commercial at-wavelength inspection tools. They describe performance measurements of two such tools, inspecting the same EUV mask in a series of benchmarking tests that includes brightfield and darkfield patterns. One tool is the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) operating on a bending magnet beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. The AIT features an EUV Fresnel zoneplate microscope that emulates the numerical aperture of a 0.25-NA stepper, and projects the aerial image directly onto a CCD camera, with 700x magnification. The second tool is an EUV microscope (EUVM) operating at the NewSUBARU synchrotron in Hyogo, Japan. The NewSUBARU tool projects the aerial image using a reflective, 30x Schwarzschild objective lens, followed by a 10-200x x-ray zooming tube. The illumination conditions and the imaging etendue are different for the two tools. The benchmarking measurements were used to determine many imaging and performance properties of the tools, including resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), aberration magnitude, aberration field-dependence (including focal-plane tilt), illumination uniformity, line-edge roughness, and flare. These measurements reveal the current state of the art in at-wavelength inspection performance, and will be a useful reference as ...
Date: February 26, 2008
Creator: Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Takase, Kei; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Han, Hakseung; Barty, Anton; Kinoshita, Hiroo et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Single shot extreme ultraviolet laser imaging of nanostructures with wavelength resolution

Description: We have demonstrated near-wavelength resolution microscopy in the extreme ultraviolet. Images of 50 nm diameter nanotubes were obtained with a single {approx}1 ns duration pulse from a desk-top size 46.9 nm laser. We measured the modulation transfer function of the microscope for three different numerical aperture zone plate objectives, demonstrating that 54 nm half-period structures can be resolved. The combination of near-wavelength spatial resolution and high temporal resolution opens myriad opportunities in imaging, such as the ability to directly investigate dynamics of nanoscale structures.
Date: January 7, 2008
Creator: Jones, Juanita; Brewer, Courtney A.; Brizuela, Fernando; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Martz, Dale H.; Chao, Weilun et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Latest results from the SEMATECH Berkeley extreme ultraviolet microfield exposure tool

Description: Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to play a dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the 0.3 numerical aperture SEMATECH Berkeley MET operating as a resist and mask test center. Here they present an update on the tool summarizing some of the latest test and characterization results. they provide an update on the long-term aberration stability of the tool and present line-space imaging in chemically amplified photoresist down to the 20-nm half-pitch level. Although resist development has shown substantial progress in the area of resolution, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of mask contributors to the LER observed from the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield tool.
Date: September 2, 2008
Creator: Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Chiu, Jerrin; Dean, Kim; Denham, Paul; George, Simi et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Collimation system for beam loss localization with slip stacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

Description: Slip stacking injection for high intensity operation of the Fermilab Main Injector produces a small fraction of beam which is not captured in buckets and accelerated. A collimation system has been implemented with a thin primary collimator to define the momentum aperture at which this beam is lost and four massive secondary collimators to capture the scattered beam. The secondary collimators define tight apertures and thereby capture a fraction of other lost beam. The system was installed in 2007 with commissioning continuing in 2008. The collimation system will be described including simulation, design, installation, and commissioning. Successful operation and operational limitations will be described.
Date: September 1, 2008
Creator: Brown, Bruce C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating permeability from quasi-static deformation: Temporal variations and arrival time inversion

Description: Transient pressure variations within a reservoir can be treated as a propagating front and analyzed using an asymptotic formulation. From this perspective one can define a pressure 'arrival time' and formulate solutions along trajectories, in the manner of ray theory. We combine this methodology and a technique for mapping overburden deformation into reservoir volume change as a means to estimate reservoir flow properties, such as permeability. Given the entire 'travel time' or phase field, obtained from the deformation data, we can construct the trajectories directly, there-by linearizing the inverse problem. A numerical study indicates that, using this approach, we can infer large-scale variations in flow properties. In an application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture (InSAR) observations associated with a CO{sub 2} injection at the Krechba field, Algeria, we image pressure propagation to the northwest. An inversion for flow properties indicates a linear trend of high permeability. The high permeability correlates with a northwest trending fault on the flank of the anticline which defines the field.
Date: May 1, 2008
Creator: Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro & Novali, Fabrizio
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

Description: We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.
Date: June 1, 2008
Creator: Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D. & Tsang, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Parallel Code for Lifetime Simulations in Hadron Storage Rings in the Presence of Parasitic Beam-Beam Interactions

Description: The usual approach to predict particle loss in storage rings in the presence of nonlinearities consists in the determination of the dynamic aperture of the machine. This method, however, will not directly predict the lifetimes of beams. We have developed a code which can, by parallelization and careful speed optimization, predict lifetimes in the presence of 100 parasitic beam-beam crossings by tracking > 10{sup 10} particles-turns. An application of this code to the anti-proton lifetime in the Tevatron at injection is discussed.
Date: March 17, 2008
Creator: Kabel, A. C.; Cai, Y.; Erdelyi, B.; Sen, T. & Xiao, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

Description: The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.
Date: March 1, 2008
Creator: Prothro, Lance
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

Description: To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.
Date: May 1, 2008
Creator: Luo,Y.; Fischer, W. & Abreu, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NSLS-II Control of Dynamic Aperture

Description: We have outlined how, by an intuitive approach, the on- and off-momentum dynamic aperture for a synchrotron light source can be estimated from a nonlinear system of algebraic equations for the sextupole/multipole strengths. The approach has only two free parameters: the relative weight for resonance vs. tune shift terms and the tune footprint for stable trajectories in a modern third generation synchrotron light source. In other words, we have established a control theory approach for the medium term (10{sup 3} turns) stability for a dynamic system described by a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations. Equipped with a predictive, quantitative model for stability, we have then evaluated how to improve the control of the dynamics by analyzing and modifying the properties of the corresponding algebraic system. In particular, by changing the number- and characteristics of the parameters, i.e., we have not evaluated how the underlying (linear) optics could be improved. We have also validated our conjectures by numerical simulations with a realistic model. Presumably, our conclusions, summarized in Section 1.0, are a direct result of the presented analysis and observations.
Date: October 31, 2008
Creator: Bengtsson,J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

Description: This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.
Date: June 23, 2008
Creator: Bengtsson,J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Insertion Devices for NSLS-II Baseline and Future

Description: NSLS-II is going to employ Damping Wigglers (DWs) not only for emittance reduction but also as broad band hard X-ray source. In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) with the minimum RMS phase error (< 2 degree) and possible cryo-capability are planned for X-ray planar device. Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are envisioned for polarization controls. Due to the lack of hard X-ray flux from weak dipole magnet field (0.4 Tesla), three pole wigglers (3PWs) of the peak field over 1 Tesla will be mainly used by NSLS bending magnet beam line users. Magnetic designs and kick maps for dynamic aperture surveys were created using the latest version of Radia [1] for Mathematica 6 which we supported the development. There are other devices planned for the later stage of the project, such as quasi-periodic EPU, superconducting wiggler/undulator, and Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) with Praseodymium Iron Boron (PrFeB) magnets and textured Dysprosium poles. For R&D, Hybrid PrFeB arrays were planned to be assembled and field-measured at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperature using our vertical test facility. We have also developed a specialized power supply for pulsed wire measurement.
Date: June 23, 2008
Creator: Tanabe,T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operational experience with a near-integer working point at RHIC.

Description: During the RHIC polarized proton run in N 2006 it became evident that the luminosity performance is limited by the beam-beam effect. With a working point between 213 and 7/10, and the necessity to mirror the tunes of the two RHIC rings at the diagonal, the beam with a horizontal tune closest to 213 showed poor lifetime. To overcome this limitation, a near-integer working point has been proposed. Tracking studies performed at both working points showed a larger dynamic aperture near the integer tune than above 2/3. In Run-8, this new working point was commissioned in one ring of RHIC, while the other ring was operated at the same working point as in Run-6. In this paper we report the commissioning process and operational experience with this new working point.
Date: June 23, 2008
Creator: Montag,C.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Experimental Study of Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Insertion Device Permanent Magnets

Description: High brilliance in the 3GeV new light source NSLS II is obtained from the high magnetic fields in insertion devices (ID). The beam lifetime is limited to 3h by single Coulomb scattering in the Bunch (Touschek effect). This effect occurs everywhere around the circumference and there is unavoidable beam loss in the adjacent low aperture insertion devices. This raises the issue of degradation and damage of the permanent magnetic material by irradiation with high energy electrons and corresponding shower particles. It is expected that IDs, especially those in-vacuum, would experience changes resulting from exposure to gamma rays, x-rays, electrons and neutrons. By expanding an on-going material radiation damage study at BNL the demagnetization effect of irradiation consisting primarily of neutrons, gamma rays and electrons on a set of NdFeB magnets is studied. Integrated doses ranging from several Mrad to a few Grad were achieved at the BNL Isotope Facility with a 112 MeV, 90 {micro}A proton beam. Detailed information on dose distributions as well as on particle energy spectra on the NdFeB magnets was obtained in realistic simulations with the MARS15 Monte-Carlo code. This paper summarizes the results of this study.
Date: June 23, 2008
Creator: Simos,N.; Job, P.K. & Mokhov, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LARP Long Nb3Sn Quadrupole Design

Description: A major milestone for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is the test, by the end of 2009, of two 4m-long quadrupole magnets (LQ) wound with Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The goal of these magnets is to be a proof of principle that Nb{sub 3}Sn is a viable technology for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. The design of the LQ is based on the design of the LARP Technological Quadrupoles, presently under development at FNAL and LBNL, with 90-mm aperture and gradient higher than 200 T/m. The design of the first LQ model will be completed by the end of 2007 with the selection of a mechanical design. In this paper we present the coil design addressing some fabrication technology issues, the quench protection study, and three designs of the support structure.
Date: June 1, 2008
Creator: Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetic and Mechanical Analysis of the HQ Model Quadrupole Designs for LARP

Description: Insertion quadrupoles with large bore and high gradient are required to upgrade the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The US LHC Accelerator Research Program is developing Nb{sub 3}Sn technology for the upgrade. This effort includes a series of 1 m long Technology Quadrupoles (TQ), to demonstrate the reproducibility at moderate field, and High-gradient Quadrupoles (HQ) to explore the magnet performance limits in terms of peak fields, forces and stresses. The HQ models are expected to achieve peak fields of 15 T or higher. A coil aperture of 90 mm, corresponding to gradients above 300 T/m, was chosen as the baseline. Peak stresses above 150 MPa are expected. Progress on the magnetic and mechanical design of the HQ models will be reported.
Date: June 1, 2008
Creator: Felice, Helene; Caspi, Shlomo; Ferracin, Paolo; Kashikhin, Vadim; Novitski, Igor; Sabbi, GianLuca et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Test of TQC models, LARP Technological Quadrupole Magnets

Description: In support of the development of a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, two-layer quadrupole models (TQC and TQS) with 90mm aperture are being constructed at Fermilab and LBNL within the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). This paper describes the development and test of TQC01b, the second TQC model, and the experience during construction of TQE02 and TQC02, subsequent models in the series. ANSYS analysis of the mechanical structure, its underlying assumptions, and changes based on experience with TQC01 are presented and discussed. Construction experience, in-process measurements, and modifications to the assembly since TQC01 are described. The test results presented here include magnet strain and quench performance during training of TQC01b, as well as quench studies of current ramp rate dependence.
Date: June 1, 2008
Creator: Bossert, R.C.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of taylor weighting, digital phase shifters, and digital attenuators to phased-array antennas.

Description: Application of Taylor weighting (taper) to an antenna aperture can achieve low peak sidelobes, but combining the Taylor weighting with quantized attenuators and phase shifters at each radiating element will impact the performance of a phased-array antenna. An examination of array performance is undertaken from the simple point of view of the characteristics of the array factor. Design rules and guidelines for determining the Taylor-weighting parameters, the number of bits required for the digital phase shifter, and the dynamic range and number of bits required for the digital attenuator are developed. For a radar application, when each element is fed directly from a transmit/receive module, the total power radiated by the array will be reduced as a result of the taper. Consequently, the issue of whether to apply the taper on both transmit and receive configurations, or only on the receive configuration is examined with respect to two-way sidelobe performance.
Date: March 1, 2008
Creator: Brock, Billy C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modified Visible and Infrared Optical Design for the ITER Upper Ports

Description: This document reports the results of a follow-on optical design study of visible-light and infrared optics for the ITER upper ports, performed by LLNL under contract for the US ITER Project Office. The major objectives of this work are to move the viewing aperture closer to the plasma so that the optical path does not cut through any adjacent blanket shield module other than the module designated for the port; move optics forward into the port tube to increase the aperture size and therefore improve the spatial resolution; assess the trade-off between spatial resolution and spatial coverage by reducing the field of view; and create a mechanical model with a neutron labyrinth. Here we show an optical design incorporating all these aspects. The new design fits into a 360 mm ID tube, as did the previous design. The entrance aperture is increased from 10 mm to 21 mm, with a corresponding increase in spatial resolution. The Airy disk diameter for 3.8 {micro}m wavelength IR light is 5.1 mm at the most distant target point in the field of view. The field of view is reduced from 60 toroidal degrees (full toroidal coverage with 6 cameras) to 50 toroidal degrees. The 10 degrees eliminated are those nearest the camera, which have the poorest view of the divertor plate and in fact saw little of the plate. The Cassegrain telescope that was outside the vacuum windows in the previous design is now in vacuum, along with lenses for visible light. The Cassegrain for visible light is eliminated. An additional set of optical relay lenses is added for the visible and for the IR.
Date: April 24, 2008
Creator: Lasnier, C; Seppala, L & Morris, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

Description: This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.
Date: March 25, 2008
Creator: Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fabrication and test of LARP technological quadrupole models of TQC series

Description: In support of the development of a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, several two-layer technological quadrupole models of TQC series with 90 mm aperture and collar-based mechanical structure have been developed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBNL. This paper summarizes the results of fabrication and test of TQC02a, the second TQC model based on RRP Nb3Sn strand, and TQC02b, built with both MJR and RRP strand. The test results presented include magnet strain and quench performance during training, as well as quench studies of current ramp rate and temperature dependence from 1.9K to 4.5K.
Date: August 1, 2008
Creator: Bossert, R.C.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Feher, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department