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[Field service postcard]

Description: A pre-printed field service postcard. The postcard has explicit instructions on how to fill out, saying the postcard will be destroyed if extra information is added, and to include only a date and signature. The handwriting at the bottom of the postcard is signed by John H. Carper and dated August 16, 1918. Carper has crossed out generated sentences, stating he is quite well and has received someone's letter dated July 18, 1918. On the back of the postcard, the addressee is Mrs. John H. Carper at 818 Austin St., Houston, Texas.
Date: August 16, 1918
Creator: Carper, John H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Don't forget me]

Description: Postcard to Mrs. Louise Carper, 818 Austin St., Houston, Texas from M.S.E. John Carper, Signal Corps. The front of the postcard has a quote that reads, "Don't forget me little girlie no matter where I roam, but think of the day the band will play when Johnnie comes marching home." The handwriting on the back of the card reads, "June-16-18. I'm well and like France very much, but oh, you U.S.A. Jack."
Date: June 16, 1918
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Well Done Men]

Description: Postcard with a photograph of an airplane flying over the Statue of Liberty, addressed to Mrs. John H. Carper, at 818 Austin St., Houston, Texas. The postcard indicates that John H. Carper will be returning from service at Camp Mills and he'll write home as soon as possible.
Date: May 23, 1919
Creator: Carper, John H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Two soldiers standing]

Description: Postcard of two unidentified soldiers standing side by side out-of-doors, near a wall. The handwriting on the back of the postcard reads, "Happy Days. [unreadable] J. E. Brown."
Date: [1918..]
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Hello, just got back]

Description: Postcard from the Jewish Welfare Board and the United States Army and Navy, with an illustration of a solider coming back on United States soil. The pre-printed text reads, "Hello - Just got back. Am Feeling great, will write soon again" with a blank space labeled "Going to Camp ___."
Date: [1919..]
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[WWI Soldiers Photo]

Description: Photograph of four soldiers, during World War I, was taken at Camp Bullis, Leon Springs, Texas in 1918 while on maneuvers with the 359th Infantry, 90th Division, as is indicated by the hand written information below the photograph. They are identified from left to right as Captain Vanderkooi, Lieutenant Rex Cunningham, Lieutenant Sam Williams, and Lieutenant Dan Leiper.
Date: 1918
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Yesterday There Was Glory: With the 4th Division, A.E.F., in World War I

Description: Memoir describing historical events and personal accounts of Gerald Andrew Howell based on his experiences during World War I, originally completed in 1946 : "His narrative was a study of a small group of American soldiers attempting to survive some of the most ferocious combat of the 'Great War.' He included information on the movements and activities of his 39th Infatry Regiment and the 4th Division, but Howell kept the focus of the story on his squad, a typical cross section of the A.E.F. {American Expeditionary Forces]" (p. 2) This edited version has some introductory and supplementary information and has made minor corrections to the original text. Index starts on page 338.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: September 2017
Creator: Howell, Gerald Andrew & Patrick, Jeffrey L.
Partner: UNT Press

Establishing the American Way of Death: World War I and the Foundation of the United States’ Policy Toward the Repatriation and Burial of Its Battlefield Dead

Description: This thesis examines the policies and procedures created during and after the First World War that provided the foundation for how the United States commemorated its war dead for the next century. Many of the techniques used in modern times date back to the Great War. However, one hundred years earlier, America possessed very few methods or even ideas about how to locate, identify, repatriate, and honor its military personnel that died during foreign conflicts. These ideas were not conceived in the halls of government buildings. On the contrary, concerned citizens originated many of the concepts later codified by the American government. This paper draws extensively upon archival documents, newspapers, and published primary sources to trace the history of America’s burial and repatriation policies, the Army Graves Registration Services, and how American dead came to permanently rest in military cemeteries on the continent of Europe. The unprecedented dilemma of over 80,000 American soldiers buried in France and surrounding countries at the conclusion of the First World War in 1918 propelled the United States to solve many social, political, and military problems that arose over the final disposition of those remains. The solutions to those problems became the foundation for how America would repatriate, honor, and mourn its military dead for the next century. Some of these battles persist even today as the nation tries to grapple with the proper way to commemorate the nation’s participation in the First World War on the eve of the conflict’s centennial.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Hatzinger, Kyle J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Item 2: World War I (4)

Description: This is the 2nd of 5 reels in the US Army Signal Corp produced film, "America Goes Over," documenting the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. The film was produced in 1918 and this print was likely produced ca. 1927. The footage begins with American troops marching through rainy streets in France, then taking wagons on French roads and gearing up for the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. The footage then shows American guns firing the first shots of the 47-day Meuse-Argonne battle, an artillery observer being launched into the air in a balloon with an early radio, then being shot down by planes and parachuting to safety while anti-aircraft guns shoot at the plane with the balloon bursting into flames afterward. The battle scenes include early night-time battle footage, artillery fire, a Renault FT-17 Tank, and various troop movement. As the troops move into the Argonne Forest the footage shows various small conflicts, the assessment of a wounded soldier, dead lying in the fields, and villages in ruins. The footage also features Generals Foch and Pershing giving an update, troops in downtime, prisoners marching, Pershing pinning medals on American troops, troops playing with a lion cub, milking a goat, dressing as women and dancing, and gambling entertainment.
Date: 1927
Creator: US Army Signal Corp
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Item 5: World War I (3)

Description: This film is the 3rd of 5 reels in the US Army Signal Corp produced film, "America Goes Over," documenting the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. The film was produced in 1918 and this print was likely produced ca. 1927. The footage opens with radio operators working in the trenches, various scenes of battle planning, artillery firing, wounded soldiers being removed from a battlefield and the dead left behind. The film then moves to the American forces move toward Soissons, crossing the Marne, and taking Chateau Thierry. The American troops are seen eating, washing, getting haircuts, and welcoming more troops and supplies from ships from the United States. Footage shows the city of supplies at Gievres, an industrial cooking demonstration, and General Pershing writing commands. The film then moves into the opening of the Saint-Mihiel Offensive of 12 Sep 1918 with many artillery scenes, Renault tanks, soldiers cutting barbed wire at dawn, and troops running out of bunkers to fight. An airplane dogfight is captured on film from this battle, ending with the German pilot being shot down and taken prisoner. Troops are then shown digging in Howitzers, crossing enemy lines, surveying the German dead, helping wounded American troops off the field, resting, then going back the next day. In the German fortifications they find a dog used for sending messages. Troops are seen eating, feeding villagers, and marching German prisoners through the streets. The footage then moves to show the American and Australian troops marching through the Hindenburg line together. The footage ends showing the St. Quentin Canal Tunnel, and King Albert and Queen Elisabeth of Belgium watch the American troops marching.
Date: 1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Item 6: World War I (2)

Description: This is the 2nd of 5 reels in the US Army Signal Corp produced film, "America Goes Over," documenting the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. The film was produced in 1918 and this print was likely produced ca. 1927. The footage begins with American troops marching through rainy streets in France, then taking wagons on French roads and gearing up for the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. The footage then shows American guns firing the first shots of the 47-day Meuse-Argonne battle, an artillery observer being launched into the air in a balloon with an early radio, then being shot down by planes and parachuting to safety while anti-aircraft guns shoot at the plane with the balloon bursting into flames afterward. The battle scenes include early night-time battle footage, artillery fire, a Renault FT-17 Tank, and various troop movement. As the troops move into the Argonne Forest the footage shows various small conflicts, the assessment of a wounded soldier, dead lying in the fields, and villages in ruins. The footage also features Generals Foch and Pershing giving an update, troops in downtime, prisoners marching, Pershing pinning medals on American troops, and a German plane being shot down.
Date: 1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Item 3: World War I (5)

Description: Film footage of the 5th of 5 reels in the US Army Signal Corp produced film, "America Goes Over," documenting the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. The film was produced in 1918 and this print was likely produced ca. 1927. The film begins with the American forces receiving supplies, repairing roads and clearing them for artillery, and digging trenches. The footage continues with five bi-planes taking off with some footage from the air, then firing artillery and fighting during an October offensive, building a bridge and crossing the Meuse, troops and a Renault tank moving through a shelled out town, and talking with villagers. The film ends with troops celebrating news of the November 11 cease-fire, Joffre, Foch, Pershing, French, and other generals shake hands.
Date: 1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections