108 Matching Results

Search Results

Fiscal Year 2005 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project

Description: Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various purposes, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users. DOE manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Performance Assessment Project, which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project integrates monitoring for various objectives into a single sampling schedule to avoid redundancy of effort and to improve efficiency of sample collection.This report documents the purposes and objectives of groundwater monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.
Date: June 16, 2005
Creator: Rieger, JoAnne T. & Hartman, Mary J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2003-2007.

Description: This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.
Date: June 10, 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2004-2008

Description: This Institutional Plan for FY 2004-2008 is the principal annual planning document submitted to the Department of Energy's Office of Science by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. This plan describes the Laboratory's mission, roles, and technical capabilities in support of Department of Energy priorities, missions, and plans. It also describes the Laboratory strategic plan, key planning assumptions, major research initiatives, and program strategy for fundamental science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national security.
Date: April 15, 2004
Creator: Quadrel, Marilyn J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

Description: This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.
Date: January 31, 2005
Creator: Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Third Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2005

Description: Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. For the Hanford Seismic Network, there were 337 triggers during the third quarter of fiscal year 2005. Of these triggers, 20 were earthquakes within the Hanford Seismic Network. The largest earthquake within the Hanford Seismic Network was a magnitude 1.3 event May 25 near Vantage, Washington. During the third quarter, stratigraphically 17 (85%) events occurred in the Columbia River basalt (approximately 0-5 km), no events in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km), and three (15%) in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km). During the first quarter, geographically five (20%) earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, 10 (50%) earthquakes were associated with a major geologic structure, and 5 (25%) were classified as random events.
Date: September 1, 2005
Creator: Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E. & Sweeney, Mark D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY 2005 Midyear Progress Report on Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task PVC57301: October 1, 2004 to March 15, 2005

Description: This report documents technical details for work performed in the Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task PVC57301 in the period from October 1 2004 to March 15 2005.
Date: September 1, 2005
Creator: Myers, D. R.; Stoffel, T. L.; Andreas, A. A.; Wilcox, S. M.; Reda, I.; Anderberg, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1961-FY2019

Description: This report is a research aid that lists the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) authorization and appropriations bills for FY1961-FY2019 including: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers. Significant definitions are also included.
Date: November 27, 2018
Creator: DeBruyne, Nese F. & Torreon, Barbara Salazar
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2002-2006

Description: This Institutional Plan for FY 2002-2006 is the principal annual planning document submitted to the Department of Energy's Office of Science by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. This plan describes the Laboratory's mission, roles, and technical capabilities in support of Department of Energy priorities, missions, and plans. It also describes the Laboratory strategic plan, key planning assumptions, major research initiatives, and program strategy for fundamental science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national security.
Date: January 2, 2002
Creator: Fisher, Darrell R. & Pearson, Erik W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NIH Funding: FY1994-FY2019

Description: This report discusses funding for the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 1994 to 2019. The NIH is the primary federal agency charged with conducting and supporting biomedical and behavioral research. It is the largest of the eight health-related agencies that make up the Public Health Service (PHS) within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
Date: October 15, 2018
Creator: Johnson, Judith A. & Sekar, Kavya
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Global Health Assistance: FY2001-FY2019 Request

Description: This report outlines U.S. funding for global health by agency and program. Congress may debate several pressing global health issues, including strengthening health systems, bolstering pandemic preparedness, considering the FY2019 budget request, protecting life in global health assistance, and authorizing the extension of PEPFAR (President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief).
Date: June 22, 2018
Creator: Salaam-Blyther, Tiaji
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct Overt U.S. Aid Appropriations for and Military Reimbursements to Pakistan, FY2002-FY2018

Description: Table of data outlining direct overt U.S. aid appropriations and military reimbursements to Pakistan including number for fiscal years 2002-2011 (combined), fiscal years 2012-2016 (individually) and estimates for 2017 and 2018.
Date: September 6, 2017
Creator: Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2017

Description: This report is a research aid that lists the Department of Defense (DOD) authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2) for FY1970-FY2017. This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers.
Date: January 18, 2017
Creator: DeBruyne, Nese F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

Description: New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion ...
Date: September 19, 2007
Creator: Farmer, J. C.; Haslam, J. J. & Day, S. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

Description: New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion ...
Date: September 20, 2007
Creator: Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY04&05 LDRD Final Report Fission Fragment Sputtering

Description: Fission fragments born within the first 7 {micro}m of the surface of U metal can eject a thousand or more atoms per fission event. Existing data in the literature show that the sputtering yield ranges from 10 to 10,000 atoms per fission event near the surface, but nothing definitive is known about the energy of the sputtered clusters. Experimental packages were constructed allowing the neutron irradiation of natural uranium foils to investigate the amount of material removed per fission event and the kinetic energy distribution of the sputtered atoms. Samples were irradiated but were never analyzed after irradiation. Similar experiments were attempted in a non-radioactive environment using accelerator driven ions in place of fission induced fragments. These experiments showed that tracks produced parallel to the surface (and not perpendicular to the surface) are the primary source of the resulting particulate ejecta. Modeling studies were conducted in parallel with the experimental work. Because the reactor irradiation experiments were not analyzed, data on the energy of the resulting particulate ejecta was not obtained. However, some data was found in the literature on self sputtering of {sup 252}Cf that was used to estimate the velocity and hence the energy of the ejected particulates. Modeling of the data in the literature showed that the energy of the ejecta was much lower than had been anticipated. A mechanism to understand the nature of the ejecta was pursued. Initially it was proposed that the fission fragment imparts its momenta on the electrons which then impart their momenta on the nuclei. Once the nuclei are in motion, the particulate ejecta would result. This initial model was wrong. The error was in the assumption that the secondary electrons impart their momenta directly on the nuclei. Modeling and theoretical considerations showed that the secondary electrons scatter many times before ...
Date: February 22, 2006
Creator: Ebbinghaus, B; Trelenberg, T; Meier, T; Felter, T; Sturgeon, J; Kuboda, A et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Spectroscopy of Shocked Deuterium

Description: We summarize the observations of unusual optical properties of shocked liquid deuterium (D{sub 2}) that led to proposing spectroscopic measurements. The apparatus built for the measurements is briefly described, along with some representative results in a test material. Unfortunately, spectroscopic measurements were not performed in shocked D{sub 2} during the course of the project. Some reasons are noted.
Date: March 27, 2006
Creator: Holmes, N. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Mapping Phonons at High-pressure

Description: In order to shed light on the intriguing, and not yet fully understood fcc-isostructural {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transition in cerium, we have begun an experimental program aimed at the determination of the pressure evolution of the transverse acoustic (TA) and longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon dispersions up to and above the transition. {gamma}-Ce Crystals of 60-80 mm diameter and 20 mm thickness were prepared from a large ingot, obtained from Ames Lab, using laser cutting, micro-mechanical and chemical polishing techniques. Three samples with a surface normal approximately oriented along the [110] direction were loaded into diamond anvil cells (DAC), using neon as a pressure transmitting medium. The crystalline quality was checked by rocking curve scans and typical values obtained ranged between one and two degrees. Only a slight degradation in the sample quality was observed when the pressure was increased to reach the {alpha}-phase, and data could be therefore recorded in this phase as well. The spectrometer was operated at 17794 eV in Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing geometry, providing an energy resolution of 3 meV and a focal spot size at the sample position of 30 x 60 mm{sup 2} (horizontal x vertical, FWHM). Eight to ten IXS spectra were typically recorded per phonon branch. Figure 1 reports the pressure dependence of the LA[100] branch in the {gamma}-phase for pressures of 1, 4 and 6 kbar, together with previous inelastic neutron scattering (INS) results [1] at ambient pressure. A clear decrease of the phonon energies with increasing pressure is observed for 1 and 4 kbar, whereas the phonon energies increase again at 6 kbar, still well within the stability field of the {gamma}-phase. Figure 2 reports the LA dispersion along all three main symmetry directions at 6 kbar ({gamma}-phase) and 8 kbar ({alpha}-phase), together with the INS results at ambient conditions. Besides the ...
Date: February 10, 2006
Creator: Farber, D. L.; Antonangelli, D.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M. & Aracne, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier Annual Monitoring Report for Fiscal Years 2005 Through 2007

Description: A prototype Hanford barrier was deployed over the 216-B-57 Crib at the Hanford Site in 1994 to prevent percolation through the underlying waste and to minimize spreading of buried contaminants. This barrier is being monitored to evaluate physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. This report summarizes data collected during the period FY 2005 through FY 2007. In FY 2007, monitoring of the prototype Hanford barrier focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, evidence of plant and animal intrusion, and the main components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and deep percolation. Owing to a hiatus in funding in FY 2005 through 2006, data collected were limited to automated measurements of the water-balance components. For the reporting period (October 2004 through September 2007) precipitation amount and distribution were close to normal. The cumulative amount of water received from October 1994 through September 2007 was 3043.45 mm on the northern half of the barrier, which is the formerly irrigated treatment, and 2370.58 mm on the southern, non-irrigated treatments. Water storage continued to show a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and declining in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm in response to evapotranspiration. The 600-mm design storage has never been exceeded. For the reporting period, the total drainage from the soil-covered plots ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to almost 20 mm under the side slopes. Over the 13-yr monitoring period, side slope drainage accounted for about 20 percent of total precipitation while the soil-covered plots account for only 0.12 mm total. Above-asphalt and below-asphalt moisture measurements show no evidence of deep percolation of water. Topographic surveys show the barrier and protective side slopes to be stable. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists ...
Date: February 1, 2008
Creator: Ward, Andy L.; Link, Steven O.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Draper, Kathryn E. & Clayton, Ray E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department