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The Ranger Ideal Volume 3: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1898–1987

Description: Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the iconic Texas Rangers, a service that has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. Thirty-one individuals—whose lives span more than two centuries—have been enshrined in the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame. They have become legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. In The Ranger Ideal Volume 3, Darren L. Ivey presents capsule biographies of the twelve inductees who served Texas in the twentieth century. In the first portion of the book, Ivey describes the careers of the “Big Four” Ranger captains—Will L. Wright, Frank Hamer, Tom R. Hickman, and Manuel “Lone Wolf” Gonzaullas—as well as those of Charles E. Miller and Marvin “Red” Burton. Ivey then moves into the mid-century and discusses Robert A. Crowder, John J. Klevenhagen, Clinton T. Peoples, and James E. Riddles. Ivey concludes with Bobby Paul Doherty and Stanley K. Guffey, both of whom gave their lives in the line of duty. Using primary records and reliable secondary sources, and rejecting apocryphal tales, The Ranger Ideal presents the true stories of these intrepid men who enforced the law with gallantry, grit, and guns. This Volume 3 is the finale in a three-volume series covering all of the Texas Rangers inducted in the Hall of Fame and Museum in Waco, Texas.
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Date: July 2021
Creator: Ivey, Darren L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Texas Ranger Captain William L. Wright

Description: William L. Wright (1868–1942) was born to be a Texas Ranger, and hard work made him a great one. Wright tried working as a cowboy and farmer, but it did not suit him. Instead, he became a deputy sheriff and then a Ranger in 1899, battling a mob in the Laredo Smallpox Riot, policing both sides in the Reese-Townsend Feud, and winning a gunfight at Cotulla. His need for a better salary led him to leave the Rangers and become a sheriff. He stayed in that office longer than any of his predecessors in Wilson County, keeping the peace during the so-called Bandit Wars, investigating numerous violent crimes, and surviving being stabbed on the gallows by the man he was hanging. When demands for Ranger reform peaked, he was appointed as a captain and served for most of the next twenty years, retiring in 1939 after commanding dozens of Rangers. Wright emerged unscathed from the Canales investigation, enforced Prohibition in South Texas, and policed oil towns in West Texas, as well as tackling many other legal problems. When he retired, he was the only Ranger in service who had worked under seven governors. Wright has also been honored as an inductee into the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame at Waco.
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Date: September 2021
Creator: McCaslin, Richard B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Bell Ringer

Description: This is the story of Victor Rodriguez, star track athlete and San Antonio educator. From his earliest days in South Texas in the 1940s he broke many barriers. As a football player and track star he set records and won trophies at Edna High School, at Victoria College, and at North Texas State College. At each stage of his education, he often found himself the only Mexican American in his group. He developed his sports prowess from nine years of early morning running to the church in Edna, to ring the bell before Mass. He earned the first Hispanic scholarships as an athlete at both Victoria Junior College and North Texas State College. After graduating in 1955, he began a career in the San Antonio School District, ultimately retiring in 1994 after twelve years as Superintendent of the District. As a pioneer Mexican American educator in San Antonio, he brought dignity and respect to the people of the Westside, where he remains a role model today.
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Date: November 2021
Creator: Rodriguez, Victor
Partner: UNT Libraries

Proud Warriors: African American Combat Units in World War II

Description: During World War II, tens of thousands of African Americans served in segregated combat units in U.S. armed forces. The majority of these units were found in the U.S. Army, and African Americans served in every one of the combat arms. They found opportunities for leadership unparalleled in the rest of American society at the time. Several reached the field grade officer ranks, and one officer reached the rank of brigadier general. Beyond the Army, the Marine Corps refused to enlist African Americans until ordered to do so by the president in June 1942, and two African American combat units were formed and did see service during the war. While the U.S. Navy initially resisted extending the role of African American sailors beyond kitchens, eventually the crew of two ships was composed exclusively of African Americans. The Coast Guard became the first service to integrate—initially with two shipboard experiments and then with the integration of most of their fleet. Finally, the famous Tuskegee airmen are covered in the chapter on air warfare. Proud Warriors makes the case that the wartime experiences of combat units such as the Tank Battalions and the Tuskegee Airmen ultimately convinced President Truman to desegregate the military, without which the progress of the Civil Rights Movement might also have been delayed.
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Date: October 2021
Creator: Bielakowski, Alexander M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

John B. Denton: the Bigger-than Life Story of the Fighting Parson and Texas Ranger

Description: Denton County and the City of Denton are named for pioneer preacher, lawyer, and Indian fighter John B. Denton, but little has been known about him. He was an orphan in frontier Arkansas who became a circuit-riding Methodist preacher and an important member of a movement of early settlers bringing civilization to North Texas. After becoming a ranger on the frontier, he ultimately was killed in the Tarrant Expedition, a Texas Ranger raid on a series of villages inhabited by various Caddoan and other tribes near Village Creek on May 24, 1841. Denton’s true story has been lost or obscured by the persistent mythologizing by publicists for Texas, especially by pulp western writer Alfred W. Arrington. Cochran separates the truth from the myth in this meticulous biography, which also contains a detailed discussion of the controversy surrounding the burial of John B. Denton and offers some alternative scenarios for what happened to his body after his death on the frontier.
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Date: October 2021
Creator: Cochran, Mike
Partner: UNT Libraries

Dirty Eddie's War: Based on the World War II Diary of Harry "Dirty Eddie" March, Jr., Pacific Fighter Ace

Description: Dirty Eddie’s War is the true account of the war-time experiences of Harry Andrew March, Jr., captured by way of diary entries addressed to his beloved wife, Elsa. Nicknamed “Dirty Eddie” by his comrades, he served as a member of four squadrons operating in the South Pacific, frequently under difficult and perilous conditions. Flying initially from aircraft carriers covering the landings at Guadalcanal in August 1942, he was one of the first pilots in the air over the island and then later based at Henderson Field with the “Cactus Air Force.” When he returned to combat at Bougainville and the “Hot Box” of Rabaul, the exploits of the new Corsair squadron “Fighting Seventeen” became legendary. Disregarding official regulations, March kept an unauthorized diary recording life onboard aircraft carriers, the brutal campaign and primitive living conditions on Guadalcanal, and the shattering loss of close friends and comrades. He captures the intensity of combat operations over Rabaul and the stresses of overwhelming enemy aerial opposition. Lee Cook presents Dirty Eddie’s story through genuine extracts from his diary supplemented with contextual narrative on the war effort. It reveals the personal account of a pilot’s innermost thoughts: the action he saw, the effects of his harrowing experiences, and his longing to be reunited with the love of his life back home.
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Date: August 2021
Creator: Cook, Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Rare Integrity: A Portrait of L. W. Payne, Jr.

Description: Leonidas Warren Payne, Jr. (1873-1945), counted Robert Frost among his friends and a member of the inner circle of poets who embraced him and sought his advice. He altered forever the perception of Texas when he created the Texas Folklore Society that continues to record, publish, and promote Texas history, myth, music, and customs. He guided J. Frank Dobie back into The University of Texas fold, where Dobie produced his finest work and established a voice for Texas literature. L. W. Payne, Jr., influenced generations of American school children through his anthologies that became basic English textbooks. Drawing upon Payne’s own writing, interviews with former colleagues and students, and private letters lain undisclosed since Payne’s death, Rare Integrity reveals a portrait of a man whose great gift of creative generosity and warmth of heart enabled him to see a person as the person wished to be seen.
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Date: November 2021
Creator: Alexander, Hansen
Partner: UNT Libraries

Times Remembered: the Final Years of the Bill Evans Trio

Description: In the late 1970s legendary pianist Bill Evans was at the peak of his career. He revolutionized the jazz trio (bass, piano, drums) by giving each part equal emphasis in what jazz historian Ted Gioia called a “telepathic level” of interplay. It was an ideal opportunity for a sideman, and after auditioning in 1978, Joe La Barbera was ecstatic when he was offered the drum chair, completing the trio with Evans and bassist Marc Johnson. In Times Remembered, La Barbera and co-author Charles Levin provide an intimate fly-on-the-wall peek into Evans’s life, critical recording sessions, and behind-the-scenes anecdotes of life on the road. Joe regales the trio’s magical connection, a group that quickly gelled to play music on the deepest and purest level imaginable. He also watches his dream gig disappear, a casualty of Evans’s historical drug abuse when the pianist dies in a New York hospital emergency room in 1980. But La Barbera tells this story with love and respect, free of judgment, showing Evans’s humanity and uncanny ability to transcend physical weakness and deliver first-rate performances at nearly every show.
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Date: September 2021
Creator: LaBarbera, Joe & Levin, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries

Oral History Interview with Toni Lewis, May 14, 2013

Description: Interview with Toni Lewis, U.S. Air Force veteran, for the Women Veterans Oral history Project. Lewis discusses her childhood, decision to enlist in 1976, experiences as a woman in the service, experiences with the Veterans Administration, and opinions about changing roles for women in the U.S. military.
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Date: May 14, 2013
Creator: Hedrick, Amy & Lewis, Toni
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Laura Gonzalez, October 13, 2007

Description: Interview with Laura Gonzalez, Mexican-born immigrant to the U.S., immigrant rights activist, and professor of anthropology with expertise in immigrant communities from Guanajuato, Mexico. She discusses her childhood and education in Mexico city; the decision to pursue a career in the field of political anthropology; decision to open the Oak Cliff Center for Community Studies; work with Camposanto del Cemento Grande and other community organizations in Dallas; work to increase Hispanics’ access to college; and involvement in immigrant rights movements and local Mexican American political groups. This interview has Spanish and English translations.
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Date: October 13, 2007
Creator: Calderon, Roberto & Laura, Gonzalez
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Dennie Wolf, September 9, 2019

Description: Transcript of an interview with Dennie Wolf, co-author of chapters on postpartum recovery in the 1979 book Ourselves and Our Children and the 1984 version Our Bodies Ourselves, both publications of the Boston Women’s Health Collective. This interview includes discussion of postpartum depression, the women’s health movement, second wave feminism, and development psychology. The interview is part of the postpartum depression project.
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This item is restricted from view until September 9, 2024.
Date: September 9, 2019
Creator: Moran, Rachel Louise & Wolf, Dennie
Partner: UNT Oral History Program
open access

Window onto a Vanished World: Lahu texts from Thailand in the 1960’s

Description: This extremely valuable collection of texts in the Lahu language represents the language and culture in the 1960’s, a time when the heritage language and culture were still vibrant and not yet globalized, hence the title Window on a Vanished World. It is also one of the largest collections of texts in any Tibeto-Burman language. The texts are available as a book and online with the audio (originally from 1960’s magnetic tape). This is a massive achievement for all involved in the recording, conversion, and editing.
Date: 2022
Creator: Matisoff, James; Chelliah, Shobhana Lakshmi; Lowe, John B. & Zhang, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Detailed Description of the UNT Libraries Metadata Elements

Description: Print-out of webpages describing the usage and formatting guidelines for metadata elements used in the UNT Libraries' Digital Collections in 2005. It includes a brief introductory explanation of metadata at UNT, guidelines for descriptive and preservation elements, and related administrative information.
Date: April 27, 2005
Creator: University of North Texas. Libraries. Digital Projects Department
Partner: UNT Libraries

Oral History Interview with Fred R. Runce, July 6, 1974

Description: Interview with Fred R. Runce, U.S. Army WWII Veteran about his experiences at Wheeler Field with the Army Ordnance Detachment during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
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Date: July 6, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Runce, Fred R.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Willard T. Kniffin, March 20, 1974

Description: Interview with Willard T. Kniffin, a financial advisor, concerning his reminiscences about the family of former New Mexico Senator Bronson Cutting, including his parents, sister, aunts, and uncles.
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Date: March 20, 1974
Creator: Seligmann, G. L., Jr. & Kniffin, Willard T.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Leon F. Painter, June 8, 1974

Description: Interview with Leon F. Painter, U.S. Marine Corps WWII veteran, about his background and experiences at the Marine Barracks between Pearl Harbor and Hickam Field during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
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Date: June 8, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Painter, Leon F.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Heinen, J. B., Jr., June 25, 1974

Description: Interview with J. B. Heinen, Jr., an independent oilman, concerning his experiences as an Army officer in the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression. Heinen worked at camps in Clarksville, Texas; San Simon, Arizona (Company 2881); Wilcox, Arizona; and Bowie, Arizona.
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Date: June 25, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Heinen, J. B., Jr.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with John J. Dubroff, May 19, 1974

Description: Interview with John J. Dubroff, U.S. Army WWII veteran, about his experiences at Schofield Barracks with the 11th Signal Company during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
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Date: May 19, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Dubroff, John J.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with John Glenewinkel, May 19, 1974

Description: Interview with John Glenewinkel, U.S. Navy WWII veteran, concerning his experiences aboard the repair ship USS Dobbin during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
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Date: May 19, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Glenewinkel, John
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with George M. Hemingway, May 18, 1974

Description: Interview with George M. Hemingway, U.S. Navy WWII veteran, concerning his experiences at Ford Island Naval Air Station with the beaching crew during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
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Date: May 18, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Hemingway, George M.
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Emil Matula, May 18, 1974

Description: Interview with Emil Matula, U.S. Army WWII veteran, concerning his background and experiences at the Schofield Barracks during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
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Date: May 18, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Matula, Emil, 1918-
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Everett Johnson, May 18, 1974

Description: Interview with Everett Johnson, U.S. Navy WWII veteran, concerning his experiences while aboard the cruiser USS San Francisco during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
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Date: May 18, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Johnson, Everett, 1921-
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with George J. Deckard, May 18, 1974

Description: Interview with George J. Deckard, U.S. Army WWII veteran, concerning his experiences at Schofield Barracks with the 11th Signal Company during the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 18, 1974
Creator: Marcello, Ronald E. & Deckard, George J., 1919-
Partner: UNT Oral History Program
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