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Characterization and refinement of carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the Ta-C system

Description: The interaction between carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the tantalum-carbon system was investigated. The research was driven by the need to characterize carbide coating formation rates. The characterization of the carbide coating formation rates was required to engineer an optimum processing scheme for the fabrication of the ultracorrosion-resistant composite, carbon-saturated tantalum. A packed-bed carburization process was successfully engineered and employed. The packed-bed carburization process produced consistent, predictable, and repeatable carbide coatings. A digital imaging analysis measurement process for accurate and consistent measurement of carbide coating thicknesses was developed. A process for removing the chemically stable and extremely hard tantalum-carbide coatings was also developed in this work.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Rodriguez, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for {Sigma}{sub c} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{pi} using {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {Sigma}{sub s}{pi}{pi} in 250 GeV {pi}{sup {minus}}-nucleon interactions

Description: Combined cross section times branching fraction limits are given for {Sigma}{sub c}{sup +}{sup +} {r_arrow} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Sigma}{sub c}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} where {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {r_arrow} {Sigma}{sub s}{sup {plus_minus}}{pi}{sup {plus_minus}}{pi}{sup +}. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} is reconstructed with partial information on the {Sigma}{sub s}; the missing {Sigma}{sub s} momentum is established through momentum conservation imposed by a constrained fit. The data are of {pi}{sup {minus}} beam interactions at 250 GeV from Fermilab experiment E769.
Date: October 10, 1995
Creator: Passmore, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

Description: This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.
Date: October 6, 1995
Creator: Shen, Luan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Basalt features observed in outcrops, cores, borehole video imagery and geophysical logs, and basalt hydrogeologic study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Idaho

Description: A study was undertaken to examine permeable zones identified in boreholes open to the underlying basalt and to describe the vertical cross flows present in the boreholes. To understand the permeable zones in the boreholes detailed descriptions and measurements of three outcrops in the Snake River Plain, three cores at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the INEL, and over fifty borehole TV logs from the INEL were carried out. Based on the observations made on the three outcrops an idealized basalt lava flow model was generated that used a set of nomenclature that would be standard for the basalt lava flows studied. An upper vesicular zone, a sometimes absent columnar zone, central zone, and lower vesicular zone make up the basalt lava flow model. The overall distinction between the different zones are based on the vesicle shape size, vesicularity, and fractures present. The results of the studies also indicated that the basalt lava flows at the INEL are distal to medial facies pahoehoe lava flows with close fitting contacts. The most permeable zones identified in these basalts are fractured vesiculated portions of the top of the lava flow, the columnar areas, and basalt-flow contacts in order of importance. This was determined from impeller flowmeter logging at the INEL. Having this information a detailed stratigraphy of individual basalt lava flows and the corresponding permeable units were generated. From this it was concluded that groundwater flow at the ICPP prefers to travel along thin basalt lava flows or flow-units. Flow direction and velocity of intrawell flows detected by flowmeter is controlled by a nearby pumping well.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Bennecke, W.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

Description: The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Barboza, N.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

Description: The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Liu, J. Chien-Chih
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders for battery application

Description: The primary objective of this research was to investigate the synthesis and characterization of Ni(OH){sub 2} powders by homogeneous precipitation. Previous research of the same method showed conflicting results and complete characterization of the particle morphology was not carried out. This study has produced precipitates having a composition of 2Ni(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}Ni(HCO{sub 3}){sub 1.85}(NO{sub 3}){sub 0.15}. The XRD patterns showed peaks commonly observed for {alpha}-Ni(OH){sub 2}. The precipitates produced from low and high cation concentration solutions showed that the mean particle size and specific surface area increased with aging time. The high specific surface area measured suggested that the particle growth occurred through the aggregation of nanosized crystallites. The TEM micrographs confirmed that the particles were actually aggregates of thin films or sheets that were crumpled and intertwined together. This work also investigated the effect of dispersant on the particle morphology. The addition of dispersants did not alter the density of the particles implying that the dispersants were not incorporated into the solid phase. A general decrease in mean particle size at each aging time was observed resulting in an increase in specific surface area. The use of dispersants provided steric hindrance for the particles in the solution to aggregate, thus smaller particles were observed. Cyclic voltammetric tests were carried out to see if the high surface area Ni(OH){sub 2} produced in this work had superior performance characteristics compared to the commercial powders currently available. Indeed, the study showed that the homogeneously precipitated Ni(OH){sub 2} had higher coulombic efficiency and degree of reversibility than the commercial powders. The efficiency values of all the homogeneously precipitated powders were approximately 90%. The same efficiency values observed were probably due to the same specific surface areas of the powders after aging in KOH solution.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Widjaja, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved resins and novel materials and methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography

Description: Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has grown to be one of the most widely used methods for isolation and preconcentration of a vast range of compounds from aqueous solutions. By modifying polymeric SPE resins with chelating functional groups, the selective uptake of metals was accomplished. The resin, along with adsorbed metals, was vaporized in the ICP and detection of the metals was then possible using either mass or emission spectroscopy. Drug analyses in biological fluids have received heightened attention as drug testing is on the increase both in sports and in the work environment. By using a direct-injection technique, biological fluids can be injected directly into the liquid chromatographic system with no pretreatment. A new surfactant, a sulfonated form of Brij-30 (Brij-S) is shown to prevent the uptake of serum proteins on commercial HPLC columns by forming a thin coating on the silica C18 surface. Excellent separations of eight or more drugs with a wide range of retention times were obtained. The separations had sharper peaks and lower retention times than similar separations performed with the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). Quantitative recovery of a number of drugs with limits of detection near 1 ppm with a 5 {micro}l injection volume were obtained. Finally, a method for solid-phase extraction in a syringe is introduced. The system greatly reduced the volume of solvent required to elute adsorbed analytes from the SPE bed while providing a semi-automated setup. SPE in a syringe consists of a very small bed of resin-loaded membrane packed into a GC or HPLC syringe. After extraction, elution was performed with just a few {micro}l of solvent. This small elution volume allowed injection of the eluent directly from the syringe into the chromatographic system, eliminating the handling problems associated with such small volumes.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Freeze, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonlinear response of superconductors to alternating fields and currents

Description: This report discusses the following topics on superconductivity: nonlinearities in hard superconductors such as surface impedance of a type II superconductimg half space and harmonic generation and intermodulation due to alternating transport currents; and nonlinearities in superconducting weak links such as harmonic generation by a long Josephson Junction in a superconducting slab.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: McDonald, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

Description: Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.
Date: October 17, 1996
Creator: Savargaonkar, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

Description: Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell ({beta}TC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Tong, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Equilibrium vortex motion in two- and three-dimensional superconductors studied with a dc SQUID

Description: The equilibrium motion of vortices in two- and three-dimensional superconductors has been studied with a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). This technique has the advantage of probing the system in a non-invasive manner as well as providing dynamic information over many decades in frequency. Through measurements of the spectral density of magnetic flux noise, S{sub {Phi}}({omega}), as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field, the effects of proton and heavy ion irradiation on flux noise in crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} have been measured and compared with the effects on the critical current, J{sub c}. Both proton and heavy ion irradiation proved effective at reducing S{sub {Phi}}({omega}), with proton irradiation having a larger effect. Measurement of S{sub {Phi}}({omega}) due to the equilibrium Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii transition in two-dimensional Josephson Junction Arrays (JJAs) was studied as a function of temperature for three different arrays and using three different sensors. S{sub {Phi}} is shown to obey dynamic scaling over as many as five decades in frequency, and estimates are made for the dynamic critical exponent z. An analytic theory for the high- and low-frequency behavior of S{sub {Phi}}({omega}) is presented and compared to the measured data, with the result that the low-frequency behavior is well described by the theory but the high-frequency behavior is not. Other theories and numerical simulations are described and compared with the data, but none are completely satisfactory. Lastly, suggestions for necessary further theoretical work and possible future experimental work are suggested.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Shaw, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and application of thin-layer spectroelectrochemical techniques for the study of organosulfur monolayers adsorbed at gold

Description: A main research interest is the characterization of monolayers formed by the spontaneous adsorption of organosulfur compounds at gold. This dissertation describes the development and application of long optical pathlength thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry in an attempt to address key issues regarding the reactivity of surface-immobilized molecules. The first section of this introductory chapter briefly describes the general approach to the preparation and characterization of these films. The last section provides an overview of the main principles and advantages of thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry for studying surface-adsorbed species. The body of this dissertation is divided into four chapters. Chapter 2 consists of a paper describing the design, construction, and characterization of a cuvette-based LOPTLC. Chapter 3 is a paper which examines the reductive desorption process using thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry to monitor and identify the desorption product. Chapter 4 is a paper describing the characterization of monolayers functionalized with a catechol terminal group which serves as a redox transformable coordination site for metal ion binding. Chapter 5 discusses the application of thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry to acid-base reactivity studies of surface-immobilized molecules. The final section provides some general conclusions and a prospectus for future studies. These chapters have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base. This report contains the introduction, references, and general conclusions. 78 refs.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Simmons, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Response of the D0 calorimeter to cosmic ray muons

Description: The D0 Detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is a large multi-purpose detector facility designed for the study of proton-antiproton collision products at the center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. It consists of an inner tracking volume, hermetic uranium/liquid argon sampling calorimetry, and an outer 4{pi} muon detector. In preparation for our first collider run, the collaboration organized a Cosmic Ray Commissioning Run, which took place from February - May of 1991. This thesis is a detailed study of the response of the central calorimeter to cosmic ray muons as extracted from data collected during this run.
Date: October 1, 1992
Creator: Kotcher, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulational studies of epitaxial semiconductor superlattices: Quantum dynamical phenomena in ac and dc electric fields

Description: Using high-accuracy numerical methods the author investigates the dynamics of independent electrons in both ideal and realistic superlattices subject to arbitrary ac and/or dc electric fields. For a variety of superlattice potentials, optically excited initial wave packets, and combinations of ac and dc electric fields, he numerically solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the case of ideal periodic superlattice potentials, he investigates a long list of dynamical phenomena involving multiple miniband transitions and time-dependent electric fields. These include acceleration effects associated with interminiband transitions in strong fields, Zener resonances between minibands, dynamic localization with ac fields, increased single-miniband transport with an auxiliary resonant ac field, and enhanced or suppressed interminiband probability exchange using an auxiliary ac field. For all of the cases studied, the resulting time-dependent wave function is analyzed by projecting the data onto convenient orthonormal bases. This allows a detailed comparison with approximately analytic treatments. In an effort to explain the rapid decay of experimentally measured Bloch oscillation (BO) signals the author incorporates a one-dimensional representation of interface roughness (IR) into their superlattice potential. He shows that as a result of IR, the electron dynamics can be characterized in terms of many discrete, incommensurate frequencies near the Block frequency. Chapters 2, 3, 4 and 5 have been removed from this report and will be processed separately.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Reynolds, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultrasonic texture characterization of aluminum, zirconium and titanium alloys

Description: This work attempts to show the feasibility of nondestructive characterization of non-ferrous alloys. Aluminum alloys have a small single crystal anisotropy which requires very precise ultrasonic velocity measurements for derivation of orientation distribution coefficients (ODCs); the precision in the ultrasonic velocity measurement required for aluminum alloys is much greater than is necessary for iron alloys or other alloys with a large single crystal anisotropy. To provide greater precision, some signal processing corrections need to be applied to account for the inherent, half-bandwidth offset in triggered pulses when using a zero-crossing technique for determining ultrasonic velocity. In addition, alloys with small single crystal anisotropy show a larger dependence on the single crystal elastic constants (SCECs) when predicting ODCs which require absolute velocity measurements. Attempts were made to independently determine these elastics constants in an effort to improve correlation between ultrasonically derived ODCs and diffraction derived ODCs. The greater precision required to accurately derive ODCs in aluminum alloys using ultrasonic nondestructive techniques is easily attainable. Ultrasonically derived ODCs show good correlation with derivations made by Bragg diffraction techniques, both neutron and X-ray. The best correlation was shown when relative velocity measurements could be used in the derivations of the ODCs. Calculation of ODCs in materials with hexagonal crystallites can also be done. Because of the crystallite symmetries, more information can be extracted using ultrasonic techniques, but at a cost of requiring more physical measurements. Some industries which use materials with hexagonal crystallites, e.g. zirconium alloys and titanium, have traditionally used texture parameters which provide some specialized measure of the texture. These texture parameters, called Kearns factors, can be directly related to ODCs.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Anderson, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructure-strength relationships of heavily deformed magnesium-lithium composites containing steel fibers

Description: The successful development of deformation-processed metal-metal composites (DMMC) offers the potential for ductile, high-strength structural materials with high-temperature stability. An infiltration casting process was used to permeate steel wool preforms with molten magnesium-lithium (Mg-Li) alloys. The selected matrix alloys were hexagonal close packed (HCP) Mg-4wt%Li or body centered cubic (BCC) Mg-12wt%Li; the low carbon steel wool fibers were predominantly BCC ferrite. These cast HCP/BCC and BCC/BCC composites were deformed by rolling or by extrusion and swaging. Mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture development of the composites were characterized at various levels of deformation. The HCP/BCC composites had limited formability at temperatures up to 400 C while the BCC/BCC composites had excellent formability during sheet rolling at room temperature but limited formability during swaging at room temperature. The tensile strengths of these HCP/BCC and BCC/BCC composite materials increased moderately with deformation, though less than predicted from rule of mixtures (ROM) calculations. The microstructure was characterized to correlate the filament size to the deformation strain and mechanical properties of the composite material. Stereological measurements of the filament size were used to adjust ROM calculations to reflect the actual deformation strain in the fibers. However, the experimental strengths of these composite materials were still less than ROM predictions, possibly due to the presence of considerably large fibers. Of the many models used to describe the strengthening observed in DMMC materials, the Hall-Petch relationship adequately described the experimental data. Texture development was also characterized to explain the deformation characteristics of the composite materials. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 are not included here. They are being processed separately.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Jensen, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase identification in reactive sintering of molybdenum disilicide composites

Description: Molybdenum disilicide has been predominantly used for furnace heating elements, but recently there has been interest in its use for high temperature structural applications. The reason for this increased interest stems from its desirable characteristics which are a high melting point, relatively low density, good oxidation resistance, relatively good thermal conductivity and electronically conductive. The melting point of MoSi{sub 2} is approximately 2030{degrees}C as compared to a melting point of 1340{degrees}C for the Ni-based superalloys. This could potentially give MoSi{sub 2} a big advantage over the Ni-based superalloys in turbine applications because the operating temperature can be increased resulting in an increase in turbine efficiency and reduced emissions. The relatively low density (6.25g/cm{sup 3}) compared to the Ni-based superalloys (8.9 g/cm{sup 3}) is an important advantage in turbine applications because of the need for low weight. Good oxidation resistance stems from the ability of MoSi{sub 2} to form a protective SiO{sub 2} surface layer when exposed to oxygen. Another advantageous feature of MoSi{sub 2} is its thermal conductivity which is superior to Ni-based superalloys at low temperatures and comparable to the Ni-based superalloys at high temperatures. This allows heat to be dissipated at a rate better than ceramics and comparable to metals. MoSi{sub 2} is electrically conductive allowing it to be electro discharge machined. This is desirable since conventional ceramics are not generally conductive and cannot be electro discharge machined.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Alba, J., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Parallel hierarchical global illumination

Description: Solving the global illumination problem is equivalent to determining the intensity of every wavelength of light in all directions at every point in a given scene. The complexity of the problem has led researchers to use approximation methods for solving the problem on serial computers. Rather than using an approximation method, such as backward ray tracing or radiosity, the authors have chosen to solve the Rendering Equation by direct simulation of light transport from the light sources. This paper presents an algorithm that solves the Rendering Equation to any desired accuracy, and can be run in parallel on distributed memory or shared memory computer systems with excellent scaling properties. It appears superior in both speed and physical correctness to recent published methods involving bidirectional ray tracing or hybrid treatments of diffuse and specular surfaces. Like progressive radiosity methods, it dynamically refines the geometry decomposition where required, but does so without the excessive storage requirements for ray histories. The algorithm, called Photon, produces a scene which converges to the global illumination solution. This amounts to a huge task for a 1997-vintage serial computer, but using the power of a parallel supercomputer significantly reduces the time required to generate a solution. Currently, Photon can be run on most parallel environments from a shared memory multiprocessor to a parallel supercomputer, as well as on clusters of heterogeneous workstations.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Snell, Q.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

Description: Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.
Date: October 1999
Creator: Su, G. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The addition of disilanes to cumulenes

Description: The syntheses of silicon-containing compounds and the studies of their rearrangements have been active research areas in the Barton research group. Previously, the addition of disilanes to acetylenes was studied in the group and an intramolecular 2S + 2A mechanism has been proposed. In this thesis, the work is focused on the addition of disilanes to cumulenes. The syntheses of the precursors are discussed and the possible mechanisms for their thermal, photochemical and catalytic rearrangements are proposed. Conjugated organic polymers have been studied in the group since 1985 because of their potential for exhibiting high electroconductivity, photoconductivity, strong non-linear optical response and intense fluorescence. In the second section of this dissertation, the synthesis and property studies of poly(phenylene vinylene) analogues are discussed.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Chen, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental Study of the Spin Structure of the Neutron (3He) at low Q2: a connection between the Bjorken and Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Sum Rules

Description: The authors have presented the motivations in gathering doubly polarized data in the quasi-elastic, resonance and DIS domains. These data were used to calculate the extended GDH integral. The comparison of this quantity with the spin dependent forward Compton amplitude {bar S}{sub 1} is of particular importance for the unification of the two strong interaction descriptions (nucleonic/hadronic vs. partonic) because {bar S}{sub 1} is the first quantity theoretically calculable in the full Q{sup 2} domain of the strong interaction. Such a data taking was made possible because of three major technical achievements: (1) the beam of high duty cycle (100%), high current (up to 70 {micro}A) and high polarization (70%); (2) the {sup 3}He target of high density (above 10 atm) with a polarization of 35% and a length of 40 cm; and (3) the large acceptance (6 msr) and high resolution ({Delta}P/P {approx_equal} 10{sup {minus}4}) spectrometers. These features, available at Jefferson Lab, enabled them to achieve the highest luminosity in the world (about 10{sup 36} s{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}2} with a current of 15 {micro}A) as far as polarized {sup 3}He targets are concerned. Consequently they were able to gather, in a rather short period of time (3 months), a large amount of data covering a large kinematical domain.
Date: October 9, 2000
Creator: Deur, Alexander
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Unsaturated Groundwater Flow Beneath Upper Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

Description: Mortandad Canyon is a discharge site for treated industrial effluents containing radionuclides and other chemicals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. This study was conducted to develop an understanding of the unsaturated hydrologic behavior below the canyon floor. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the hypothetical performance of the vadose zone above the water table. Numerical simulations of unsaturated groundwater flow at the site were conducted using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer (FEHM) code. A two-dimensional cross-section along the canyon's axis was used to model flow between an alluvial groundwater system and the regional aquifer approximately 300 m below. Using recharge estimated from a water budget developed in 1967, the simulations showed waters from the perched water table reaching the regional aquifer in 13.8 years, much faster than previously thought. Additionally, simulations indicate that saturation is occurring in the Guaje pumice bed an d that the Tshirege Unit 1B is near saturation. Lithologic boundaries between the eight materials play an important role in flow and solute transport within the system. Horizontal flow is shown to occur in three thin zones above capillary barriers; however, vertical flow dominates the system. Other simulations were conducted to examine the effects of changing system parameters such as varying recharge inputs, varying the distribution of recharge, and bypassing fast-path fractured basalt of uncertain extent and properties. System sensitivity was also explored by changing model parameters with respect to size and types of grids and domains, and the presence of dipping stratigraphy.
Date: October 15, 1998
Creator: Dander, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The use of Fourier reverse transforms in crystallographic phase refinement

Description: Often a crystallographer obtains an electron density map which shows only part of the structure. In such cases, the phasing of the trial model is poor enough that the electron density map may show peaks in some of the atomic positions, but other atomic positions are not visible. There may also be extraneous peaks present which are not due to atomic positions. A method for determination of crystal structures that have resisted solution through normal crystallographic methods has been developed. PHASER is a series of FORTRAN programs which aids in the structure solution of poorly phased electron density maps by refining the crystallographic phases. It facilitates the refinement of such poorly phased electron density maps for difficult structures which might otherwise not be solvable. The trial model, which serves as the starting point for the phase refinement, may be acquired by several routes such as direct methods or Patterson methods. Modifications are made to the reverse transform process based on several assumptions. First, the starting electron density map is modified based on the fact that physically the electron density map must be non-negative at all points. In practice a small positive cutoff is used. A reverse Fourier transform is computed based on the modified electron density map. Secondly, the authors assume that a better electron density map will result by using the observed magnitudes of the structure factors combined with the phases calculated in the reverse transform. After convergence has been reached, more atomic positions and less extraneous peaks are observed in the refined electron density map. The starting model need not be very large to achieve success with PHASER; successful phase refinement has been achieved with a starting model that consists of only 5% of the total scattering power of the full molecule. The second part of the thesis ...
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Ringrose, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department