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Rediscovering Music Published in American Newspapers

Description: Poster gives information about music that was published in American newspapers from 1900 to 1920 by the American Melody company. This poster was shown at the 2015 National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) Awardee Conference at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. on September 17, 2015.
Date: September 17, 2015
Creator: Fisher, Sarah Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Newsmap. Monday, January 17, 1944 : week of January 6 to January 13, 227th week of the war, 109th week of U.S. participation

Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: USSR, Burma, Air war, Italy, Southwest Pacific, Yugoslavia, Jet plane. Map inset: Enemy controlled areas across the globe Photographs: Chinese workers and soldiers pack dirt for an airfield in southeastern China; WACs Capt. Elizabeth Lutze, Sheboygan, Wis., Lt. Sally Dean, Battle Creek, Mich. and Flight officer Margaret Maude, WAAF, London, pause behind a sacred cow lying in front of a bazaar in Delhi, India; U.S. engineers supervise the building of the new Ledo Road in northern Burma; Lt. Gen. Krueger watches the plane taking Gen. Marshall back to the U.S.; Gen. Marshall confers with Gen. Sir Thomas Blamey; Gen. George C. Marshall with Lieut. Gen. George C. Kenney, Maj. Gen. S.J. Chamberlain, Lieut. Gen. Walter Krueger, Gen. Marshall and Gen. MacArthur; Logone, Italy during a battle between Fifth Army artillery and German forces; Soldiers look for salvage in a pile of shell cases and containers following a barrage against German positions in Cassino; American soldiers of the Fifth Army repair a tank motor near battle lines. Back: Map of Southeast Asia.
Date: January 17, 1944
Creator: [United States.] Army Service Forces. Morale Services Division.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Men of 18 and 19: now you can choose your branch of service.

Description: Poster in black & white and green tones. The main image is a green-tinted photograph of head and shoulders of a soldier in a helmet, looking upward. A white inset at right lists various branches of service.
Date: October 17, 1942
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Newsmap for the Armed Forces

Description: Front: Maps: Major bases proposed for postwar U.S. Navy; Japan: American troops invest the enemy homeland. Photograph: First U.S. Occupation Forces March Down Tokyo Street. Back: Comparison chart of non-commissioned grades and ratings of the armed forces (Army, Navy and Coast Guard, Marine Corps).
Date: September 17, 1945
Creator: [United States.] Army Service Forces. Army Information Branch.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Newsmap. For the Armed Forces. 253rd week of the war, 135th week of U.S. participation

Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts : France, Italy, Eastern front, Pacific, China, Japan. Maps: American-controlled areas around Geelvink Bay; Military actions in the south Pacific Ocean; Guam ; Europe. Inset map: Dutch New Guinea Back: Map of Japan and adjacent regions includes glossary of Japanese geographic terms and suffixes..
Date: July 17, 1944
Creator: [United States.] Army Service Forces. Army Information Branch.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Newsmap. For the Armed Forces. 240th week of the war, 122nd week of U.S. participation

Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: USSR; Air war; Southeast Asia; Central Pacific; Southwest Pacific. Maps: Burma; Dutch New Guinea/ North-East New Guinea/ Papua./ Relief shown by shading. Includes 6 photographs. Back: Are the folks at home backing us up? . . . . Text describes war bond purchasing on the homefront. Includes illustrations.
Date: April 17, 1944
Creator: [United States.] Army Service Forces. Army Information Branch.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[GayTeenth: Texas homosexual conduct law ruled unconstitutional]

Description: A poster of with the title "Gayteenth Aug. 17, 1982 Texas homosexual conduct law ruled constitutional." On the top of the poster is a photograph of Don Baker celebrating with his arms stretched in front of a crowd.
Date: August 17, 1982
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Binder's Collection of Music as Indicators of Local Activity, a Case Study

Description: This poster provides a case study of how binder's collections reveal the musical, economic, and political culture of an area through a case study using a four-volume set from Florence G. Boyer Paulson, of Chicago, which contains music collected during the 1860s and 1870s.
Date: September 17, 2015
Creator: Hartsock, Ralph
Partner: UNT Music Library

Newsmap. Monday, August 17, 1942 : week of August 7 to August 14

Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: Solomon Islands, New Guinea, Aleutians, China, India, Western Europe, Yugoslavia, Mediterranean, Russia. Large world map is keyed to text and illustrates time zones around the world. Map insets show Solomon Islands, Russian front. Includes photographs: view of Tulagi; German fighter; Facing the Nazis; Sniper suit; A traitor covers up; Club for U.S. forces on London. Back: British Battle Dress. Includes 6 photograhs, 4 drawings with accompanying text.
Date: August 17, 1942
Creator: [United States]. Army Orientation Course.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Newsmap for the Armed Forces : U.S. role in world affairs

Description: Text describes U.S. role in world affairs and is keyed to map. Map projection is "designed to minimize distortions along the 40th parallel which runs approximately through Tokyo and Washington."
Date: December 17, 1945
Creator: [United States.] Army Information Branch.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Newsmap. Monday, May 17, 1943 : week of May 7 to May 14, 192nd week of the war, 74th week of U.S. participation

Description: Front: Text describes action on various war fronts: North Africa, Southwest Pacific, China-Burma, Plans, Aleutians, Russia Large world map is keyed to text and shows United Nations, Axis and Axis occupied areas, countries with Axis relations broken, and neutral countries. Inset maps: Shrinking battle lines in Tunisia; Crimea and surrounding region showing Nazi held territories. Photographs: Army-Navy expedition lands at Amchitka; Army gunner sets up AA defense at the westernmost U.S. air base in the Aleutians; Navy Seabees take shelter in foxholes; Allied soldiers line up for chow in almost knee-deep mud. Back: Text entitled "So he can fight!" describes the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps.
Date: May 17, 1943
Creator: [United States.] Army Orientation Course.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternations of Structure and Functional Activity of Below Ground Microbial Communities at Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

Description: The global atmospheric concentration of CO2 has increased by more than 30percent since the industrial revolution. Although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity have been well studied, its influences on belowground microbial communities are poorly understood and controversial. In this study, we showed a significant change in the structure and functional potential of soil microbial communities at eCO2 in a grassland ecosystem, the BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2 and Nitrogen) experimental site (http://www.biocon.umn.edu/) using a comprehensive functional gene array, GeoChip 3.0, which contains about 28,0000 probes and covers approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles as well as other functional processes. GeoChip data indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different between ambient CO2 (aCO2) and eCO2 by detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all 5001 detected functional gene probes although no significant differences were detected in the overall microbial diversity. A further analysis of 1503 detected functional genes involved in C, N, P, and S cycles showed that a considerable portion (39percent) of them were only detected under either aCO2 (14percent) or eCO2 (25percent), indicating that the functional characteristics of the microbial community were significantly altered by eCO2. Also, for those shared genes (61percent) detected, some significantly (p<0.05) changed their abundance at eCO2. Especially, genes involved in labile C degradation, such as amyA, egl, and ara for starch, cellulose, and hemicelluloses, respectively, C fixation (e.g., rbcL, pcc/acc), N fixation (nifH), and phosphorus utilization (ppx) were significantly increased under eCO2, while those involved in decomposing recalcitrant C, such as glx, lip, and mnp for lignin degradation remained unchanged. This study provides insights into our understanding of belowground microbial communities and their feedbacks to terrestrial ecosystems at eCO2.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: He, Zhili; Xu, Meiying; Deng, Ye; Kang, Sanghoon; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

Description: Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of experimental warming and clipping on metabolic change of microbial community in a US Great Plains tallgrass prairie

Description: While more and more studies are being conducted on the effects of global warming, little is known regarding the response of metabolic change of whole soil microbial communities to this phenomenon. In this study, functional gene changes at the mRNA level were analyzed by our new developed GeoChip 3.0. Soil samples were taken from a long-term climate warming experiment site, which has been conducted for ~;;8 years at the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory, a 137.6-ha farm located in the Central Redbed Plains, in McClain County, Oklahoma. The experiment uses a paired factorial design with warming as the primary factor nested with clipping as a secondary factor. An infrared heater was used to simulate global warming, and clipping was used to mimic mowing hay. Twelve 2m x 2m plots were divided into six pairs of warmed and control plots. The heater generates a constant output of ~;;100 Watts m-2 to approximately 2 oC increase in soil temperature above the ambient plots, which is at the low range of the projected climate warming by IPCC. Soil whole microbial communities? mRNA was extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized with our GeoChip 3.0, a functional gene array covering genes involved in N, C, P, and S cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation, to examine expressed genes. The results showed that a greater number and higher diversity of genes were expressed under warmed plots compared to control. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all detected genes showed that the soil microbial communities were clearly altered by warming, with or without clipping. The dissimilarity of the communities based on functional genes was tested and results showed that warming and control communities were significantly different (P&lt;0.05), with or without clipping. Most genes involved in C, N, P and S cycling were expressed at higher levels in warming samples compared ...
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Xie, Jianping; Liu, Xinxing; Liu, Xueduan; Nostrand, Joy D. Van; Deng, Ye; Wu, Liyou et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

Description: Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao & Zhi, Xiaoyang
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HuMiChip: Development of a Functional Gene Array for the Study of Human Microbiomes

Description: Microbiomes play very important roles in terms of nutrition, health and disease by interacting with their hosts. Based on sequence data currently available in public domains, we have developed a functional gene array to monitor both organismal and functional gene profiles of normal microbiota in human and mouse hosts, and such an array is called human and mouse microbiota array, HMM-Chip. First, seed sequences were identified from KEGG databases, and used to construct a seed database (seedDB) containing 136 gene families in 19 metabolic pathways closely related to human and mouse microbiomes. Second, a mother database (motherDB) was constructed with 81 genomes of bacterial strains with 54 from gut and 27 from oral environments, and 16 metagenomes, and used for selection of genes and probe design. Gene prediction was performed by Glimmer3 for bacterial genomes, and by the Metagene program for metagenomes. In total, 228,240 and 801,599 genes were identified for bacterial genomes and metagenomes, respectively. Then the motherDB was searched against the seedDB using the HMMer program, and gene sequences in the motherDB that were highly homologous with seed sequences in the seedDB were used for probe design by the CommOligo software. Different degrees of specific probes, including gene-specific, inclusive and exclusive group-specific probes were selected. All candidate probes were checked against the motherDB and NCBI databases for specificity. Finally, 7,763 probes covering 91.2percent (12,601 out of 13,814) HMMer confirmed sequences from 75 bacterial genomes and 16 metagenomes were selected. This developed HMM-Chip is able to detect the diversity and abundance of functional genes, the gene expression of microbial communities, and potentially, the interactions of microorganisms and their hosts.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Tu, Q.; Deng, Ye; Lin, Lu; Hemme, Chris L.; He, Zhili & Zhou, Jizhong
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Identification of Small RNAs in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

Description: Desulfovibrio vulgaris is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of facilitating the removal of toxic metals such as uranium from contaminated sites via reduction. As such, it is essential to understand the intricate regulatory cascades involved in how D. vulgaris and its relatives respond to stressors in such sites. One approach is the identification and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs); molecules ranging in size from 20-200 nucleotides that predominantly affect gene regulation by binding to complementary mRNA in an anti-sense fashion and therefore provide an immediate regulatory response. To identify sRNAs in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not possess an annotated hfq gene, RNA was pooled from stationary and exponential phases, nitrate exposure, and biofilm conditions. The subsequent RNA was size fractionated, modified, and converted to cDNA for high throughput transcriptomic deep sequencing. A computational approach to identify sRNAs via the alignment of seven separate Desulfovibrio genomes was also performed. From the deep sequencing analysis, 2,296 reads between 20 and 250 nt were identified with expression above genome background. Analysis of those reads limited the number of candidates to ~;;87 intergenic, while ~;;140 appeared to be antisense to annotated open reading frames (ORFs). Further BLAST analysis of the intergenic candidates and other Desulfovibrio genomes indicated that eight candidates were likely portions of ORFs not previously annotated in the D. vulgaris genome. Comparison of the intergenic and antisense data sets to the bioinformatical predicted candidates, resulted in ~;;54 common candidates. Current approaches using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR are being used toverify expression of the candidates and to further develop the role these sRNAs play in D. vulgaris regulation.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Burns, Andrew; Joachimiak, Marcin; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam & Bender, Kelly
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mapping the Two-component Regulatory Networks in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

Description: D. vulgaris Hildenborough has 72 response regulators. The Desulfovibrio are sulfate reducing bacteria that are important in the sulfur and carbon cycles in anoxic habitats. Its large number of two componenent systems are probably critical to its ability to sense and respond to its environment. Our goal is to map these RRs to the genes they regulate using a DNA-affinity-purification-chip (DAP-chip) protocol. First target determined usuing EMSA. A positive target was determined for as many RRs as possible using EMSA. Targets were selected based on gene proximity, regulon predictions and/or predicted sigma54 dependent promoters. qPCR was used to ensure that the target was enriched from sheared genomic DNA before proceeding to the DAP-chip.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric; Dehal, Paramvir; Joachimiak, Marcin & Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

Description: Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy & Zhou, Jizhong
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Role of the Tetraheme Cytochrome c3 in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Metabolism

Description: The role of tetraheme cytochrome c3 (CycA) in the metabolism of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) was investigated by deletion of the cycA gene using a marker-exchange deletion strategy. A highly abundant periplasmic cytochrome, CycA has the important function of transferring electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd, Hyn, Hys) to transmembrane complexes which transport the electrons to the cytoplasm where sulfate is reduced. Previous studies have indicated that during its interaction with periplasmic hydrogenases, CycA is also involved in the reduction of toxic metals. Growth of the cycA mutant strain on lactate as the electron donor and sulfate as the terminal electron acceptor showed that, despite its abundance, CycA is not essential for DvH growth. However, the rate of growth of the mutant strain was significantly lower, and the extent of growth less, than rates and extents of growth of the wild type and complement strains on lactate/sulfate medium. This indicates that a portion of the electrons generated from cytoplasmic lactate oxidation are transported by CycA for energy production, possibly in a hydrogen cycling mechanism employed to generate ATP. Failure of the mutant strain to grow on either formate or H2, with sulfate or sulfite as electron acceptors, further indicated that CycA may be the only redox partner of periplasmic hydrogenases. The cycA mutant strain also did not grow as well as either the wild type or complement strains on medium supplemented with pyruvate/sulfate. Final growth on pyruvate/sulfate was comparable, but the mutant grew more slowly than the wild type and complement strains. Interestingly, the mutant grew better than the wild type or complement strains on pyruvate alone, possibly due to the release of H2 and/or CO2 in concentrations which may be somewhat inhibitory to wild type growth.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Semkiw, Elizabeth; Zane, Grant & Wall, Judy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic Co-cultures

Description: In environments where the amount of the inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, sulfur oroxidized metal ions (Fe3+;Mn4+) is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic associations of fermenting, acetogenic bacteria (e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as&quot;secondary fermenters&quot;) and methanogenic archaea. In these consortia, the conversion of lactate to acetate, CO2 and methane depends on the cooperating activities of both metabolically distinct microbial groups that are tightly linked by the need to maintain the exchanged metabolites (hydrogenandformate) at very low concentrations.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Meyer, Birte & Stahl, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Taxa-area Relationship (TAR) of Microbial Functional Genes with Long-TGerm Fertilization

Description: Diversity and spatial patterns in plant and animal communities are well documented as a positive-power law of a taxa-area relationship (TAR). At present little is known whether this also applies to soil microbial communities and whether long-term fertilization has an influence on the underlying microbial diversity. To test the effects of long-term fertilization on above-ground botanical diversity and below-ground microbial diversity, a nested sampling approach on Park Grass plots (12d&amp; 11/2c) of Rothamsted Reseach in United Kingdom, both at ~;; pH 5 but with plant diversities of between 42 and 13 respectively were used. GeoChip 3.0, covering approximately 57, 000 gene sequences of 292 gene families involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance, and organic contaminant degradation, was used to determine the gene area relationships for both functional and phylogenetic groups and the relationship to plant diversity. Our analysis indicated that the microbial communities were separated by different plant diversity based on DCA. The soil microbial diversity was in accord with plant diversity. Soil microbial community exhibited different z value with different plant diversity, z = 0.0449 with higher plant diversity and z = 0.0583 with lower plant diversity (P&lt; 0.0001). These results suggest that the turnover in space of microorganisms may be higher with long-term fertilization.
Date: May 17, 2010
Creator: Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian; Xue, Kai; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department