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The Sociological Factors Associated with the Career Development of Women Theological Graduates

Description: Because it is representative of other Southern Baptist seminaries and distinguished by a vigorous graduate program, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (SWBTS) was chosen as the institution from which the population was taken. The study, conducted in 1984, collected data about women graduates of SWBTS for the years 1975, 1978, and 1981, with the following purposes: (1) to develop a profile of women who choose seminary education as an avenue of career preparation; (2) to determine the degree of influence of significant others --individuals in the family, school, peer group, and the church -- on women pursuing graduate education in order to prepare for ministry vocations. Among the findings of the study are these observations: 1. Despite a consistently supportive role from church pastors about respondents' career choices before, during, and after seminary, few seminary graduates encountered clergywomen as role models, or received material support from their home churches, and many encountered gender bias and discrimination as they sought ministry-related careers throughout their educational careers and afterwards. 2. The most desired career choices expressed by respondents include missionary, age group minister, counselor, minister of education, and college or seminary teacher. 3. The least desired career choices of respondents include minister of music, graded choir director, church musician, minister of outreach, pastor, associate pastor, chaplain, and recreation specialist. 4. Mothers, fathers, campus ministers, close friends, fellow seminary students, and missionaries and mission activities were cited, variously, as positively influencing seminary graduates at different stages of their careers. The study's conclusions include the further observation that despite disturbing discrimination against them, the women querried remained faithful to the Southern Baptist denomination, desired to serve, and wished for self improvement in their study and growth.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Kimberling, Cheryl Gray
Partner: UNT Libraries

Background Characteristics and Matriculation Rationale of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Students in Selected Two-Year Colleges

Description: The research was designed to test the hypothesis that significant differences exist between Hispanic and non-Hispanic students respecting background characteristics and reasons for enrollment in selected two-year colleges. The findings led to firm conclusions regarding the need for educational institutions to provide remedial and tutorial services, liberal financial aid, culturally sensitive institutional ambience, diversity in faculty, counselors, and staff, and instructional and student development programs responsive to the cultural diversity of all students.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Dexter, R. Parker (Rawlins Parker)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Secondary Social Studies Teaching Competencies as Perceived by Student-Teachers, Instructors, and Administrators in Thailand

Description: The major purpose of this study was to determine what differences exist among groups of social studies student-teachers, instructors, and administrators in eight teachers colleges in Northern Thailand regarding their perceptions of the importance of selected social studies teaching competencies.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Kamonkan Witayangkoon
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of Selected Factors on Nonpersistence of Nontraditional Students at a Comprehensive Community College

Description: The purpose of the study was to determine the direct influences of selected environmental, academic, and background factors as well as academic outcomes and expression of intent to leave on persistence or non-persistence of nontraditional students at a comprehensive community college in the Dallas County Community College District. The study applied a conceptual model of nontraditional undergraduate student attrition. Data for this study were collected during the Fall, 1987 semester from 312 first-year nontraditional students using the two-year institution questionnaires from the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems. In addition, follow-up surveys were administered to the 97 students who did not re—enroll for the Spring, 1988 semester. The data were analyzed using discriminant function, chi square, and product-moment correlation. For these nontraditional students, educational goal commitment, cumulative grade point average (GPA) and expression of intent to leave at the end of the semester had significant direct influence on persistence or non-persistence decisions. In contrast, environmental factors such as finances, employment status, and family responsibilities, and background factors such as high school academic performance, enrollment status and parents' education level did not directly influence dropout decisions. Nontraditional students reported receiving moderate to high levels of encouragement to remain in college from outside sources, especially employers. In spite of this encouragement, a frequent reason given for leaving college was the inability to cope with working and going to school at the same time. The results generally confirmed that the conceptual model used in this study provided a valid framework for research on nontraditional student attrition. Accurate prediction of persistence or non-persistence of nontraditional students in a community college appears quite difficult due to the heterogeneity of this student population and their diverse educational goals.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Laman, Michael A. (Michael Alan)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Teacher Education Programs in Member Institutions of the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI): a Comparison With NCATE Standards

Description: The problem of this study concerns the structure and content of teacher education programs in colleges and universities which are members of the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI). A questionnaire was developed and consisted of four sections: (1) general background information of the respondent; (2) questions relating to the live NCATE standards using a Likert scale of 1 to 3, regarding respondent's teacher education program; (3) general information concerning Bible credit hours required, critical problems and factors considered in job placement of graduates; and (4) an opinionnaire concerning current issues in teacher education, significant changes in respondents' programs and cooperative and unusual program arrangements. One hundred questionnaires were mailed to the 100 collegiate members of ACSI in 1987. Of the 75 returned, 57 were usable. This represents a 57 percent response rate. Based on the information provided by the chairpersons participating in the study, the following conclusions are drawn relative to ACSI teacher education programs: 1. The influence of an outside agency, such as the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), seems to benefit teacher education programs. 2. State accreditation of teacher education programs appears to be important to both NCATE and non-NCATE accredited programs. 3. Of the five NCATE standards, knowledge base for professional education was the standard that seemed to be the strongest to ACSI collegiate members. 4. ACSI schools emphasize biblical and theological education concurrent with teacher education. 5. Institutions with NCATE accredited programs seem to be satisfied with NCATE accreditation, although institutions with non-NCATE accredited programs seem to favor additional accreditation from an organization other than NCATE. 6. The small number of ACSI programs accredited by NCATE may be due to (1) theological conflicts, (2) fiscal requirements, (3) the amount of work involved in the accreditation process, or any combination of the ...
Date: May 1989
Creator: Kivioja, Larry A. (Larry Albert)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Association between Class Size, Achievement, and Opinions of University Students in First-Semester Calculus

Description: The purposes of the study were: to determine the relationship between class size and academic achievement among university students in first-semester calculus classes, and to compare opinions about the instructor, course, and classroom learning environment of university students in small first-semester calculus classes with those in large classes. The sample consisted of 225 university students distributed among two large and two small sections of first-semester calculus classes taught at the University of Texas at Arlington during the fall of 1987. Each of two tenured faculty members taught a large and small section of approximately 85 and 27 students, respectively. During the first week of the semester, scores from the Calculus Readiness Test (CR) were obtained from the sample and used as the covariate in each analysis of covariance of four periodic tests, a comprehensive final examination, and final grade average. The CR scores were also used in a logistic regression analysis of attrition rates between each pair of large and small sections of first-semester calculus. Three semantic differentials were used to test the hypotheses relating to student opinion of the instructor, course, and classroom learning environment. It was found that for both pairs of large and small first-semester calculus classes there was no significant difference in the adjusted means for each of the four periodic tests, the final examination scores, the final grade averages, and the attrition rates. It was also found that the means of the student evaluation of the course by students in small and large classes were not significantly different, and the results of the student evaluations of the instructor and classroom learning environment by students in small and large first—semester calculus classes were mixed.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Warren, Eddie N. (Eddie Nelson)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Discrimination of Time-Compressed Speech Stimuli: a Comparison Study Using a Closed-Set Task With Older Adults

Description: Use of time-compressed speech stimuli has been found to be clinically effective in differential diagnosis of lesions of the temporal lobe. However, notably absent from the literature is information concerning performance of adults on time-compressed closed-set speech discrimination tasks. The goal of this study mas to compare performance of 12 males and 12 females between age 50 and age 70 on a time-compressed closed-set speech discrimination test against the performance of 12 males and 12 females between age 10 and age 28 on the same task. The Word Intelligibility by Picture Identification test (WPI) was presented in both non-compressed and time-compressed conditions to all subjects. Previous research suggests that a difference in performance between age groups and between males and females in the older age group should be expected. Average results indicated negligible differences between age or gender groups under any of the conditions tested. Additionally, the test yielded perfect or near perfect scores for all subjects in the non-compressed condition. Lack of differentiation of results suggests that the Word Intelligibility by Picture Identification CUIPI) may be insensitive to the discrimination disorders expected in older adults, that the subjects included in the study were atypical of older adults in general and therefore such discrimination disorders did not exist in the sample, or that the subjects in the study uiere able to apply some type of compensatory strategies which resulted in the unexpected performance.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Patterson, Karen Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relative Value and Importance of Perceived Benefits of Active Foundations of Public Community Colleges in the United States

Description: The problem of this study was the relative value and importance of perceived benefits of active foundations of public community colleges. The purposes were to identify a list of benefits; determine the importance of these benefits as perceived by presidents and foundation executive directors; assess the degree to which the level of importance of the benefits was affected by college or foundation demographics or foundation executive director characteristics; and to determine if presidents and foundation executive directors differ in their perceptions of the importance of the benefits. Survey instruments were mailed to presidents and foundation executive directors of colleges determined to have active foundations. Both instruments contained seven categories listing potential benefits to the community colleges of an active foundation. The foundation executive directors' instruments also requested college and foundation demographic data. Respondents were asked to rate the benefits according to their level of importance. Analysis of variance tests were performed to determine whether the categories of benefits were affected by any of the demographic data, when a level of significance emerged, a Scheffe' test was performed to determine the source of significance. Major findings were that the most important single benefit to the community colleges of active foundations is the provision of student scholarships. The "Public Relations/Political Influence" role of the active foundation is the most important category of benefits. The more fund-raising activities held and the greater the amount of contributions, the more positively community college administrators felt about the role of their active foundations in terms of external relations. Highly experienced foundation executive directors were more positive about the importance of the public relations role of their active foundations than were their inexperienced counterparts. The major conclusion of this study was that community colleges benefit from having active foundations, both monetarily and through the role of the ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Henry, Elizabeth H. (Elizabeth Henderson)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Computer Literacy Levels and Attitudes toward Computers of Thai Public University Students

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate and analyze computer literacy and general attitudes toward computers of students at Thai public unversities. The comparative study of computer literacy levels and attitudes toward computers among Thai students with various demographic classification was performed followed by the study of relationships between the two variables among the samples. A fifty-eight-item questionnaire was adapted from the computer literacy questionnaire developed by the researchers at the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium. The items were designed to assess knowledge and attitudes relative to computers. The questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 492 students who took at least one computer course from thirteen public universities in Thailand. Statistical tests used to analyze the data included t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson product moment correlations. Based on the research findings, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) Thai university students exhibited a moderate computer literacy level. (2) While a higher proportion of female students enrolled in computer classes, male and female students reported similar computer literacy levels. (3) Graduate students had higher computer literacy levels than did other students from different educational levels. (4) Academic majors and academic performance (GPAs) were also factors affecting computer literacy levels. Education majors displayed higher computer literacy levels than mathematics majors and science majors. (5) Students with higher GPAs had higher levels of computer literacy than the groups with lower GPAs. (6) Computer literacy was not age dependent. (7) Generally, Thai university students showed positive attitudes toward computers. (8) Males and females both showed positive attitudes toward computers. (9) Graduate students exhibited more positive attitudes toward computers than all other groups. (10) The groups of students with lower GPAs displayed lower positive attitudes toward computers. (11) There was a strong positive relationship between students' knowledge and their attitudes toward computers. ...
Date: August 1989
Creator: Jaruwan Skulkhu
Partner: UNT Libraries

The History of the Baylor University School of Nursing, 1909-1950

Description: This study traces the development of the Baylor University School of Nursing from its beginning in 1909 through the establishment of the baccalaureate nursing program in 1950. Primary data including official records of the School of Nursing, minutes of the Baylor University Board of Trustees, reports of the School of Nursing to accrediting agencies, and interviews of former students and deans were examined using the historical research techniques of external and internal criticism. A review of the literature that is relevant to the development of nursing education is presented in Chapter II. Chapter III presents the events in the development of the Baylor University School of Nursing. Chapter IV discusses the accreditation criteria which influenced the development of the School of Nursing. Chapter V discusses the curriculum, teaching methods, and faculty qualifications. Chapter VI discusses the people who were the most influential in the development of the School of Nursing. Implications of the study include the recognition that nursing education and nursing service have differing priorities. Conflicts between the needs of patients for care and the needs of students for education arose when the Superintendent of Nurses was responsible for both areas. Usually the needs of patients for care took priority over the needs of students resulting in long hours and less than optimum learning conditions for students. External factors played a major role in the development of nursing education by determining the needs of society for nurses and thus for nursing education. Accreditation criteria established by state and national agencies determined the standards by which the School of Nursing was judged. National accreditation had more impact on the School since higher standards were required. The leadership of the School played a significant role in the development of the professional nursing program. Leaders who had educational preparation and vision for ...
Date: December 1988
Creator: Garner, Linda F. (Linda Faye)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Counseling Service Needs of Chinese College Students: Student, Faculty, and Student Affairs Staff Perceptions

Description: This study was designed to explore the different perceptions of college students' counseling service needs as well as the perceptions of counseling services by the student, faculty, and student affairs staff groups and subgroups of each group. The research approach of this investigation was a case study of one national university in the Republic of China. This study tested seven hypotheses and the major findings are as follows: there were significant differences among students, faculty, and student affairs staff members' perceptions of counseling services in terms of importance and success. Although all three groups agreed that the achievement of the counseling goals were important, the students showed a significantly stronger expectation than did faculty members. Findings related to the success of counseling services in the institution indicated that student affairs staff members showed higher mean scores than did the faculty and students. All three groups perceived a significant discrepancy between the importance of counseling services and the success of counseling services. Moreover, all subgroups of students, as divided by demographic variables, perceived a significant discrepancy between the importance and success of counseling services. All subgroups of faculty and student affairs staff members, except the members of military instructors and members with a mainland China educational background, perceived significant differences between the importance and success of counseling services. The sex, age, class level, academic major, and grade point average of students indicated significant differences either in the importance or the success of counseling services. Likewise, the status, educational background, and degrees earned of faculty and student affairs staff members also showed significant differences in the perceptions of either the importance or the success of counseling services. The study suggested that program planners should be aware of demographic variables when planning counseling programs. Further definitive research is recommended in order to investigate ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Chang, Sheue Mei
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Historical Study of the Impact of the Christian Development on the Contributions of Frank C. Laubach in Literacy Education

Description: Frank C. Laubach made substantial contributions both to literacy education and the Christian life. There were between sixty and one hundred million people who learned to read through his literacy campaigns. He traveled to 130 countries developing literacy primers in 312 languages. At the same time, Laubach was a missionary mystic, spiritual experimenter and leader among Protestant Christians. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between two important parts of Laubach's life: his Christian development and literacy education. The study presents an overview of the family and social background of Frank C. Laubach from a chronological framework. Additional chapters examine: the importance of i-he Christian disciplines in Laubach's life, the impact of the missionary call and Laubach's concern for Christian social responsibility. The final chapter summarizes and evaluates the research. Both the Laubach collection, found in the George Arents Research Library at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York, and the library at Laubach Literacy International in Syracuse, provided the resources for comprehensive research in the life of Frank C. Laubach.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Lawson, J. Gregory (James Gregory)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Public View of Adult Education

Description: In this study the public view of adult education in the United States was inferred from articles published in nationally distributed magazines. Two hundred twenty-eight articles from fifty-three non-professional magazines published in the United States from January 1,1970, through December 31, 1987, were reviewed. The articles were selected from those listed under "adult education," or cross referenced as "see also" under "adult education" in the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature. The research questions were: What concept of adult education appears in the print media? To what extent is this view congruent with professional views of adult education? Leisure learning and literacy programs were prevalent and available from a variety of sources. Adult illiteracy was reported as a national concern. Programs that were commonplace (basic education, general equivalency degree classes, job skills training, and industrial training) were reported less often than new or novel programs. Most articles were positive in tone, promoting adult education activities as useful, rewarding, and enjoyable experiences, but ignored adult education as a professional field. The public view as reflected in the articles was positive with programs available to adults of many levels of educational attainment. The public view was not congruent with professional writings. Group activities were more in evidence than self directed learning. Learners tended to be urban, educated, and Caucasian. Although few programs restricted participation because of age or gender there were discernible groups of aged people and women. Programs were usually sponsored by institutions of higher education and entrepreneurs, and rarely by public school systems, community organizations, or cultural groups. Program content reflected adult interest in self improvement and entertainment rather than professional growth. To refine an understanding of the public view, further research focusing on other information sources such as national and regional newspapers and the electronic media is needed, making it ...
Date: December 1988
Creator: McCallister, Joe Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Development of the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, Bangkok, Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to describe the development of Thailand's oldest private university, the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, Bangkok, Thailand, from 1963 to 1987. This historical research used records and documents which are primary sources from the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce and the Association of Private Higher Education Institutions of Thailand together with interviews with the chairman of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, president, faculty and staff of the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce. Secondary sources were reports and publications from the Ministry of University Affairs and libraries in Thailand. The areas of emphasis in the study were government policies on private higher education, legislation that initiated the founding of the University, the founder, the university's goals, the university's organizational structure, financial sources, admission policies, physical plants, programs, faculty and students. It was found that the Thai government encourages the establishment of private higher education institutions. The Private Higher Educational Institution Act of 1979 was enacted to allow Private universities to be equal to government universities. The university of the Thai Chamber of Commerce was founded by the Thai Chamber of Commerce with the purpose of training Thai students for the business sector and promoting the economic stability of the nation. The university's organizational structure is centralized and is self-supporting. The university strives for academic excellence, and thus supports the development of the nation. Suggestions for further study include: (a) the study of private higher education institutions which were established with all of the various fields of study in place, and (b) a study to identify factors that will contribute to the future development of the university of the Thai Chamber of Commerce and other private universities in Thailand.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Orachorn Arthabowornpisan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Job Satisfaction among Faculty Members at Six Metropolitan Area Teachers Colleges in Bangkok, Thailand

Description: The purpose of study was to compare job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction among faculty members at six teachers colleges in the Bangkok metropolitan area with respect to age, gender, length of experience, level of education, administrative position, academic rank, department, faculties, and salary. The findings of this research were compared with previous studies of Vatthaisong (1982) and Karoonlanjakorn (1986), which measured job satisfaction among faculty members in the Northeastern part and in the non-metropolitan areas of Central Thailand. Additionally, this inquiry expanded the two previous studies and speculated on the possibility that Herzberg's two-factor theory is adaptable to Thai faculty members in Thailand. The instrument consisted of ten demographic items and a 67-statement questionnaire. The questionnaire was based on Herzberg's two-factor theory, and used a five-point rating scale for ten facets of job satisfaction/dissatisfaction. The total stratified random sampling population was made up of 400 faculty members from six teachers colleges in the Bangkok metropolitan area. The returned rate for questionnaires was 383 (95.75%). Frequency, percentage, mean, t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and Scheffe method were used for analyses. The level of significance was set at .05. The findings of this study indicated that faculty members with high ages, high work, experiences, high salaries, high academic ranks, high levels of education, and high administrative positions were more satisfied with their jobs than faculty members with lower rankings in these demographic variables. Male faculty members were more satisfied than female faculty members. The results of this research were similar to Vatthaisong's and different from Karoonlanjakorn's. The faculty members of Vatthaisong's inquiry and those of the present study were satisfied with their jobs in every facet except salary, while Karoonlanjakorn's findings reported that no areas of dissatisfaction were revealed. Because the factors described in Herzberg's theory were not the same as those ...
Date: May 1989
Creator: Suntharin Thanagosai
Partner: UNT Libraries

Strategic Human Resources Planning in American Industrial and Service Companies

Description: This study investigated the current practices of strategic human resources planning (SHRP) at large industrial and service companies in the United States and compared these practices with Walker's Four Stages of Human Resources planning model. The data for this study were collected from 130 industrial companies and 117 service companies listed in Fortune directories of the largest 500 industrial and largest 500 service companies in the United States. The study investigated also the impact of internal and external environmental factors on these companies' practices of SHRP. MANOVA, Factor Analysis, and Percentile Analysis were used as prime statistical methods in this study. Environmental factors studied were found to explain 78 per cent of the variances among large American companies. No significant difference was found between industrial and service companies in their SHRP practices. Significant improvements have taken place in large United States business corporations' practices of SHRP since the introduction of Walker's model (1974). These improvements took place in human resources information systems, forecasting human resource needs, human resource planning and development, and evaluation of SHRP projects, but the improvements were unbalanced. The improvements in corporate-centered SHRP activities were greater than the improvements in employee-centered SHRP activities. The reasons for unbalanced developments were explained and future directions were predicted. The findings of this study were compared to the findings of many recent studies in SHRP fields and future directions of the developments of SHRP were discussed. The conclusions of this study suggested that United States corporations are in need of balanced development in both employee-centered and corporate-centered SHRP. American companies are in need of advanced models to shape their practice in SHRP fields. Walker's model has been evaluated as the best available model. The study showed that mediumsized companies in the United States will benefit from SHRP and that they are ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Busiony, Ismail Ali
Partner: UNT Libraries

Perceptions of Decision-Makers of the Future Role of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in the Funding Process for Public Senior Colleges and Universities

Description: This study compares the perceptions of presidents and academic and fiscal vice presidents of Texas public senior colleges and universities and with those of (appointed) members of the Texas Coordinating Board. A survey instrument was developed, based upon appropriate coordinating board functions discussed in the literature review, A five-point scale was used to measure intensity or agreement or disagreement. Responses were subjected to one way analysis of variance to determine differences between administrators and board members. Differences significant at the .05 level are reported. Administrators and board members differed significantly on all statements related to centralized control versus internal autonomy. Board members endorsed a greater variety of roles and a higher level of activity for the board than did administrators, although members were not expansionistic. Administrators indicated diverse opinions regarding the board's role. Responses related to formula funding were similar. Board members believed that requests to the legislature for higher education funding needs should be presented in terms of a statewide system; administrators indicated uncertainty. Both agreed on the increasing importance of long-range planning in formula development, but administrators were unsure whether such planning would help provide stability and realistic expectations in funding. Both groups endorsed a greater role for the board in collecting, interpreting, and disseminating information regarding higher education institutions. Neither subgroup offered an opinion regarding subjection of higher education budget requests to the criteria used for other state agencies. Board members and administrators disagreed as to whether private business standards were appropriate for higher education institutions. The relationship between funding recommended by the board and appropriations passed by the legislature was not considered appropriate for evaluating board success. State appropriations for higher education were seen as an investment in the state's economic future. Administrators did not believe college and university faculties understood the board s role in ...
Date: December 1988
Creator: Newcomer, Julia D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Participants and Nonparticipants in Nonformal Education in Thai Rural Areas: A Secondary- Analysis

Description: This study was a secondary analysis of survey data on participants and nonparticipants in Thai rural education programs. The original data were collected in 1987 by the Office of the National Educational Commission, Office of the Prime Minister, Bangkok Thailand. This study was conducted in order to examine the effect of selected demographic variables on participation and to determine why some rural villagers participate in nonformal educational programs and other villagers do not. The data were collected from a survey of nonformal education in Thai rural areas conducted as part of the evaluation of the Fifth Five-Year Plan. The population consisted of 590 participants in nonformal education programs and 860 nonparticipants. The statistical techniques employed to analyze data were logit analysis, z-test, tables of binomial distribution, and ranking by each of the groups (participants and nonparticipants). The evidence from this study indicates that the average nonformal education participant is an adult between the age of 36 and 50 years, who has completed four or less years of education, and who is married and works in farming (cultivating rice). The findings reveal that participants and nonparticipants in nonformal education programs were significantly different according to their needs for health knowledge, agricultural knowledge, further education, knowledge for living, and vocational knowledge. The reasons associated with participation in nonformal education programs, in this study, were to gain knowledge useful for making a living, for personal interest, to interact with instructors and students, or to make new friends. In this study, the reasons that villagers did not participate in the program were because they lacked time and transportation. While majority of the participants responded that they were satisfied with the nonformal educational courses, four subgroups, adults from age 21 to 35 years, single adults, adults who completed P.5 (grade 5) and above, and farmers, ...
Date: December 1989
Creator: Puongrat Kesonpat
Partner: UNT Libraries

Competency Needs of Administrators in Teacher Training Colleges in Kenya As Perceived By Administrators and Faculty

Description: The problem of this study was the needed administrative competencies of administrators in teacher training colleges in Kenya as perceived by administrators and faculty. A questionnaire (Inventory of Administrative Competencies) was mailed to principals, vice-principals, and four faculty members selected at random from sixteen teacher training colleges in Kenya. Ninety-six questionnaires were returned, yielding a return rate of 100 percent. Responses were analyzed using t-tests and one-way analyses of variance utilizing the F-test of the statistical test. A series of post hoc comparisons was made using Duncan's New Multiple Range Test to locate significant differences. Based on the analysis of data, it was concluded that both administrators and faculty considered the desired status of the competency very high. The administrators were performing below the desired status. Size of college was the major factor for the differences in perceptions of the respondents. Years of experience and educational background had little or no effect on the respondents' responses to the questionnaire. The following recommendations were made: A future study should investigate the perceived desired status and present performance ratings assigned to a validated set of competency statements of those levels of administrative activities not included in this study. Such a study would involve school inspectors, provincial education officers, deans of students, and heads of departments. A study should be made to investigate the current methods of evaluating administrative competence in teacher training colleges in Kenya. The results of this study should be analyzed by the Ministry of Education teacher college program developers responsible for conducting administrative workshops or in—service training in Kenya. This study could provide developers with additional information for improving the adequacy and relevance of both pre—service and in-service programs for practicing administrators.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Konditi, Jane A. O. (Jane Akinyi Osamba)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of the Incidence of Learning Disabilities among Soldiers in the U. S. Army's Basic Skills Education Program

Description: One of the U.S. Army's requirements for reenlistment of first term soldiers is a minimum score on the General Technical composite of the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery of one hundred. The score is a measure of academic ability. The primary goal of the Basic Skills Education Program is to assist the soldier in gaining basic skills, with a secondary goal of enabling him or her to retest at a sufficient level to become eligible for reenlistment. While most soldiers are able to meet this goal, a few are unable to achieve an acceptable score on the retest. It was hypothesized that some of these soldiers are learning disabled. The Army has not recognized learning disabilities or the need of the learning disabled for special teaching and testing methods. This study was designed to identify students enrolled in the Basic Skills Education Program who are learning disabled. Two instruments were involved: the Revised BETA II, which yields a measure of aptitude, and the Tests of Adult Basic Education, which produce achievement scores in the areas of reading, mathematics, language, and spelling. The instruments were correlated on 112 soldiers from the Training Brigade at Fort Bliss, Texas. They were then administered to 100 first term soldiers enrolled in the Basic Skills Education Program at Fort Bliss. Two formulae acceptable in the field of learning disabilities were applied to the results. The Frequency of Regression Prediction Discrepancy model identified nine soldiers as learning disabled in ten academic areas. The Standard Score Difference model, which does not account for regression, identified sixteen soldiers in twenty four areas. With evidence that learning disabled soldiers exist in the Basic Skills Education Program, recommendations were made that the U. S. Army recognize and address learning disabilities and incorporate appropriate testing and teaching methods to accommodate those ...
Date: May 1989
Creator: Walsh, Velma Joy
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of the Perceptions of the Role of Deans of Students at Selected Universities in the Republic of China

Description: This study was designed to explore the perceptions of the leadership behavior of deans of students at 15 universities in the Republic of China (ROC). The study groups included the deans of students, student affairs staff members, and student leaders within the 15 universities. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was employed to assess the leadership behavior of the deans of students in the dimensions of initiating structure and consideration. The population included 10 current deans of students and 8 former deans of students, 173 student affairs staff members, and 224 student leaders. In addition, six current deans of students and one officer of the Ministry of Education were interviewed by the researcher. The conclusions are as follows. 1. Current and former deans of students had the same perceptions and expectations of the leadership behavior in the initiating structure and consideration dimensions. 2. Effective leadership behavior of deans of students was associated with high scores on initiating structure and consideration. 3. Deans of students employed different leadership behaviors to lead the student affairs staff members and student leaders. 4. The leadership behavior of the deans of students was inclined toward high initiating structure and low consideration. 5. Deans of students and student affairs staff members had differing perceptions of leadership behavior on real consideration. 6. Deans of students and the student leaders had differing perceptions of leadership behavior on real initiating structure. This study suggested that a dean of students may want to employ a plan of self-study, or participate in leadership training programs, workshops, and conferences related to student affairs to improve leadership behavior effectively. Further research to examine the perceptions of the leadership behavior of deans of students is recommended.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Chen, Chin Kuei.
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Investigation into the Effectiveness of Intelligent Tutoring on Learning of College Level Statistics

Description: The present research incorporated the content of basic statistics into the Artificial Intelligence Physics Tutor (ARPHY), which was used as the expert system shell, and investigated the effects of the Artificial Intelligent Statistics Tutor (ARSTAT) as a supplement to learning statistics at the college level. Two classes of an introductory educational statistics course in the Department of Educational Foundations, University of North Texas, were used in the study. The daytime class was used as the experimental group and the evening class was used as the control group. The experimental group's lecture/discussion was supplemented with ARSTAT, and the control group received only lecture/discussion. A one-way analysis of covariance was used to compare students' test scores. No significant difference was found; however, the adjusted mean score of the experimental group was slightly higher than that of the control group. A two-way analysis of covariance showed no significant main effect or interaction between gender and study technique. A second two-way analysis of covariance showed no significant interaction between the students' attitude toward statistics and the study technique used. However, the students with a statistics-positive attitude scored significantly higher on the test than students who had a negative attitude toward statistics. This study concluded that the ARSTAT can be used effectively as a tutor for students taking an introductory course in educational statistics. The following recommendations for further study were made: incorporate more advanced topics of statistics into the ARPHY teaching model; incorporate the ARPHY learning theory and statistical content using another version of LISP language or another programming language such as PROLOG; and compare the ARSTAT tutor to some other kind of supplement to lecture/discussion.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Palitawanont, Nanta
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Educational Contributions of Dr. W.A. Criswell, Pastor of the First Baptist Church, Dallas, Texas, 1944-1987

Description: Dr. W. A. Criswell is the well known pastor of the twenty-seven thousand member historic First Baptist Church in downtown Dallas, Texas. He has held the position for the past forty-three years. Until now no one has attempted an in-depth study of Criswell's educational contributions to the First Baptist Church (which have also been adopted into the Southern Baptist denomination, America's largest Protestant religious organization). Although Criswell has been the Senior Pastor of the First Baptist Church of Dallas for many years, this was by no means his introduction to the pastorate. In 1928 he was ordained as a seventeen year old minister of the gospel in Amarillo, Texas. He has been a pastor for over sixty years. Criswell has made a lasting impact on the church staff, school staff (Criswell College and First Baptist Academy), students in those schools, the Southern Baptist denomination and also the city of Dallas. He has been one of the key figures in evangelical national movements. Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Senators, and Governors are no strangers to a Sunday morning service held in the large sanctuary in downtown Dallas. Much of the research for this project originated from the Oral Memoirs of W. A. Criswell. a program for oral history done by two professors (Charlton and Spain) from Baylor University. The study begins with a historical review of the setting of the First Baptist Church in 1944 when Criswell came to be pastor. Next there is a review of Criswell's early life that reveal influences which molded his educational philosophies. The body of knowledge is then presented which points out significant events, contributions, institutions and associations provided by Criswell. Finally, seventeen conclusions are drawn from the data presented. The study provides helpful information to pastors, church administrators, seminary students, theological professors and other individuals involved in ...
Date: August 1988
Creator: Rohm, Robert A. (Robert Allan)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Tribhuvan University and its Educational Activities in Nepal

Description: The purpose of this study was to discuss the role of Tribhuvan University in the development of higher education in Nepal by examining the university's historical development and educational activities. Despite negligence and opposition to public higher education by the rulers of Nepal before 1951, Nepalese higher education began with the establishment of Trichandra College in 1918. From 1951 until the establishment of Tribhuvan University in 1959, several public as well as private colleges were also established. The establishment of the university in 1959 marked the beginning of the government-controlled system of higher education in Nepal. As the first and only national institution of higher education, Tribhuvan University has played a significant role in developing a system of higher education in the country. During its first ten years, Tribhuvan University did not operate as a comprehensive institute of higher education. The Tribhuvan University Act of 1971, however, altered the structure, organization, and functions of the university and gave it additional roles and responsibilitites. By the mid-1980s, Tribhuvan University had increased its number of colleges from 49 (1970) to more than 128. Moreover, these colleges have expanded their programs and levels of education. This dissertation's six chapters describe the demographic, cultural, and historical setting of Nepal, the educational activities of Nepal before the establishment of Tribhuvan University, and the university's educational activities from its establishment in 1959 through the mid-1980s. The study shows that the university, in a 26-year period, had expanded it activities significantly and had proven its role as an important factor in the development of higher education in Nepal. The study also indicates that various governmental and non-governmental agencies have been actively involved in determining the educational activities of Tribhuvan University in Nepal.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Poudel, Madan Raj
Partner: UNT Libraries