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Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills: FY1970-FY2017

Description: This report is a research aid that lists the Department of Defense (DOD) authorization bills (Table 1) and appropriations bills (Table 2) for FY1970-FY2017. This report includes all the pertinent information on the passage of these bills through the legislative process: bill numbers, report numbers, dates reported and passed, recorded vote numbers and vote tallies, dates of passage of the conference reports with their numbers and votes, vetoes, substitutions, dates of final passage, and public law numbers.
Date: January 18, 2017
Creator: DeBruyne, Nese F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

Description: New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion ...
Date: September 19, 2007
Creator: Farmer, J. C.; Haslam, J. J. & Day, S. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

Description: New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion ...
Date: September 20, 2007
Creator: Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY04&05 LDRD Final Report Fission Fragment Sputtering

Description: Fission fragments born within the first 7 {micro}m of the surface of U metal can eject a thousand or more atoms per fission event. Existing data in the literature show that the sputtering yield ranges from 10 to 10,000 atoms per fission event near the surface, but nothing definitive is known about the energy of the sputtered clusters. Experimental packages were constructed allowing the neutron irradiation of natural uranium foils to investigate the amount of material removed per fission event and the kinetic energy distribution of the sputtered atoms. Samples were irradiated but were never analyzed after irradiation. Similar experiments were attempted in a non-radioactive environment using accelerator driven ions in place of fission induced fragments. These experiments showed that tracks produced parallel to the surface (and not perpendicular to the surface) are the primary source of the resulting particulate ejecta. Modeling studies were conducted in parallel with the experimental work. Because the reactor irradiation experiments were not analyzed, data on the energy of the resulting particulate ejecta was not obtained. However, some data was found in the literature on self sputtering of {sup 252}Cf that was used to estimate the velocity and hence the energy of the ejected particulates. Modeling of the data in the literature showed that the energy of the ejecta was much lower than had been anticipated. A mechanism to understand the nature of the ejecta was pursued. Initially it was proposed that the fission fragment imparts its momenta on the electrons which then impart their momenta on the nuclei. Once the nuclei are in motion, the particulate ejecta would result. This initial model was wrong. The error was in the assumption that the secondary electrons impart their momenta directly on the nuclei. Modeling and theoretical considerations showed that the secondary electrons scatter many times before ...
Date: February 22, 2006
Creator: Ebbinghaus, B; Trelenberg, T; Meier, T; Felter, T; Sturgeon, J; Kuboda, A et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Spectroscopy of Shocked Deuterium

Description: We summarize the observations of unusual optical properties of shocked liquid deuterium (D{sub 2}) that led to proposing spectroscopic measurements. The apparatus built for the measurements is briefly described, along with some representative results in a test material. Unfortunately, spectroscopic measurements were not performed in shocked D{sub 2} during the course of the project. Some reasons are noted.
Date: March 27, 2006
Creator: Holmes, N. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Mapping Phonons at High-pressure

Description: In order to shed light on the intriguing, and not yet fully understood fcc-isostructural {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transition in cerium, we have begun an experimental program aimed at the determination of the pressure evolution of the transverse acoustic (TA) and longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon dispersions up to and above the transition. {gamma}-Ce Crystals of 60-80 mm diameter and 20 mm thickness were prepared from a large ingot, obtained from Ames Lab, using laser cutting, micro-mechanical and chemical polishing techniques. Three samples with a surface normal approximately oriented along the [110] direction were loaded into diamond anvil cells (DAC), using neon as a pressure transmitting medium. The crystalline quality was checked by rocking curve scans and typical values obtained ranged between one and two degrees. Only a slight degradation in the sample quality was observed when the pressure was increased to reach the {alpha}-phase, and data could be therefore recorded in this phase as well. The spectrometer was operated at 17794 eV in Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing geometry, providing an energy resolution of 3 meV and a focal spot size at the sample position of 30 x 60 mm{sup 2} (horizontal x vertical, FWHM). Eight to ten IXS spectra were typically recorded per phonon branch. Figure 1 reports the pressure dependence of the LA[100] branch in the {gamma}-phase for pressures of 1, 4 and 6 kbar, together with previous inelastic neutron scattering (INS) results [1] at ambient pressure. A clear decrease of the phonon energies with increasing pressure is observed for 1 and 4 kbar, whereas the phonon energies increase again at 6 kbar, still well within the stability field of the {gamma}-phase. Figure 2 reports the LA dispersion along all three main symmetry directions at 6 kbar ({gamma}-phase) and 8 kbar ({alpha}-phase), together with the INS results at ambient conditions. Besides the ...
Date: February 10, 2006
Creator: Farber, D. L.; Antonangelli, D.; Beraud, A.; Krisch, M. & Aracne, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier Annual Monitoring Report for Fiscal Years 2005 Through 2007

Description: A prototype Hanford barrier was deployed over the 216-B-57 Crib at the Hanford Site in 1994 to prevent percolation through the underlying waste and to minimize spreading of buried contaminants. This barrier is being monitored to evaluate physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. This report summarizes data collected during the period FY 2005 through FY 2007. In FY 2007, monitoring of the prototype Hanford barrier focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, evidence of plant and animal intrusion, and the main components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and deep percolation. Owing to a hiatus in funding in FY 2005 through 2006, data collected were limited to automated measurements of the water-balance components. For the reporting period (October 2004 through September 2007) precipitation amount and distribution were close to normal. The cumulative amount of water received from October 1994 through September 2007 was 3043.45 mm on the northern half of the barrier, which is the formerly irrigated treatment, and 2370.58 mm on the southern, non-irrigated treatments. Water storage continued to show a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and declining in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm in response to evapotranspiration. The 600-mm design storage has never been exceeded. For the reporting period, the total drainage from the soil-covered plots ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to almost 20 mm under the side slopes. Over the 13-yr monitoring period, side slope drainage accounted for about 20 percent of total precipitation while the soil-covered plots account for only 0.12 mm total. Above-asphalt and below-asphalt moisture measurements show no evidence of deep percolation of water. Topographic surveys show the barrier and protective side slopes to be stable. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists ...
Date: February 1, 2008
Creator: Ward, Andy L.; Link, Steven O.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Draper, Kathryn E. & Clayton, Ray E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY2005 AND FY2006 CORROSION SURVEILLANCE RESULTS FOR L BASIN

Description: This report documents the results of the L-Basin Corrosion Surveillance Program for the fiscal years 2005 and 2006. The water quality and basin conditions for the coupon immersion period are compared to the corrosion evaluation results from detailed metallurgical analysis of the coupons. Test coupons were removed from the basin on two occasions, March 29, 2005 and May 23, 2006, examined and photographed. Selected coupons were metallurgically characterized to evaluate the extent of general corrosion and pitting. Crystallographic and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis were performed on a typical specimen, as-removed from the basin, to characterize the surface debris. Marked changes were noted in both the 2005 and 2006 specimens compared to previous years corrosion results. A new pitting incidence has occurred on the faces of the aluminum coupons compared to localized pitting at crevice regions only on specimens withdrawn in 2003 and 2004. The pitting incidence is attributed to sand filter fines that entered the basin on July 27, 2004 from an inadvertent backflush of the new sand filter. Pitting rate results show a trend of slowing down over time which is consistent with aluminum pit kinetics. Average pit growth rates were equal to or lower in all 2006 aluminum coupons than those removed in 2005. A trend line shows that pitting corrosion rates on Al1100, 6061, and 6063 coupons are slowing down since pit depth measurements were initiated in 2003. No impact to stored spent fuel is expected from the debris. The storage configuration of the majority of L-Basin spent fuel, in bundles, should provide a measure of isolation from debris settling in the basin.
Date: January 30, 2008
Creator: Vormelker, P & Cynthia Foreman, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Sensor Fusion for Regional Monitoring of Nuclear Materials with Ubiquitous Detection

Description: The detection of the unconventional delivery of a nuclear weapon or the illicit transport of fissile materials is one of the most crucial, and difficult, challenges facing us today in national security. A wide array of radiation detectors are now being deployed domestically and internationally to address this problem. This initial deployment will be followed by radiation detection systems, composed of intelligent, networked devices intended to supplement the choke-point perimeter systems with more comprehensive broad-area, or regional coverage. Cataloging and fusing the data from these new detection systems will clearly be one of the most significant challenges in radiation-based security systems. We present here our results from our first 6 months of effort on this project. We anticipate the work will continue as part of the Predictive Knowledge System Strategic Initiative.
Date: February 15, 2006
Creator: Labov, S E & Craig, W W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report The Innermost Inner Core: Fact or Artifact?

Description: P'P' (PKPPKP) are P waves that travel from a hypocenter through the Earth's core, reflect from the free surface and travel back through the core to a recording station on the surface. Here we report the observations of hitherto unobserved near-podal P'P' waves (at epicentral distance < 10{sup o}) and very prominent precursors preceding the main energy by as much as 60 s. We interpret these precursors as a back-scattered energy from previously undocumented horizontally connected small-scale heterogeneity in the upper mantle beneath the oceans in a zone between 150 and 220 km depth beneath the Earth's surface. From these observations, we identify a frequency dependence of attenuation quality factor Q in the lithosphere through forward modeling of the observed amplitude spectra of the main and back-scattered P'P' waves. In addition, we did not find that travel times corresponding to very polar paths through the centermost inner core with respect to the rotation axis of Earth are anomalously advanced, which argues for isotropic or at best --weakly-anisotropic center of Earth in the direction parallel with the rotation axis. More systematic sampling near Earth's center and characterization of anisotropy in Earth's center will be a subject of future research efforts.
Date: January 9, 2006
Creator: Tkalcic, H; Flanagan, M P & Mogri, H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final ReportNanomaterials for Radiation Detection

Description: We have demonstrated that it is possible to enhance current radiation detection capability by manipulating the materials at the nano level. Fabrication of three-dimensional (3-D) nanomaterial composite for radiation detection has great potential benefits over current semiconductor- and scintillation-based technologies because of the precise control of material-radiation interaction and modulation of signal output. It is also a significant leap beyond current 2-D nanotechnology. Moreover, since we are building the materials using a combination of top-down and bottom-up approaches, this strategy to make radiation detection materials can provide significant improvement to radiation-detection technologies, which are currently based on difficult-to-control bulk crystal growth techniques. We are applying this strategy to tackle two important areas in radiation detection: gamma-rays and neutrons. In gamma-ray detection, our first goal is to employ nanomaterials in the form of quantum-dot-based mixed matrices or nanoporous semiconductors to achieve scintillation output several times over that from NaI(Tl) crystals. In neutron detection, we are constructing a 3-D structure using a doped nanowire ''forest'' supported by a boron matrix and evaluating the detection efficiency of different device geometry with simulation.
Date: February 6, 2006
Creator: Wang, T F; Letant, S E; Nikolic, R J & Chueng, C L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

Description: Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.
Date: February 10, 2006
Creator: Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Fianl Report Investigation of AAA+ protein machines that participate in DNA replication, recombination, and in response to DNA damage LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-LW-049

Description: The AAA+ proteins are remarkable macromolecules that are able to self-assemble into nanoscale machines. These protein machines play critical roles in many cellular processes, including the processes that manage a cell's genetic material, but the mechanism at the molecular level has remained elusive. We applied computational molecular modeling, combined with advanced sequence analysis and available biochemical and genetic data, to structurally characterize eukaryotic AAA+ proteins and the protein machines they form. With these models we have examined intermolecular interactions in three-dimensions (3D), including both interactions between the components of the AAA+ complexes and the interactions of these protein machines with their partners. These computational studies have provided new insights into the molecular structure and the mechanism of action for AAA+ protein machines, thereby facilitating a deeper understanding of processes involved in DNA metabolism.
Date: December 4, 2006
Creator: Sawicka, D; de Carvalho-Kavanagh, M S; Barsky, D & Venclovas, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Chemical Dynamics At Interfaces

Description: At high pressure and temperature, the phase diagram of elemental carbon is poorly known. We present predictions of diamond and BC8 melting lines and their phase boundary in the solid phase, as obtained from first principles calculations. Maxima are found in both melting lines, with a triple point located at {approx} 850 GPa and {approx} 7400 K. Our results show that hot, compressed diamond is a semiconductor which undergoes metalization upon melting. In contrast, in the stability range of BC8, an insulator to metal transition is likely to occur in the solid phase. Close to the diamond/ and BC8/liquid boundaries, molten carbon is a low-coordinated metal retaining some covalent character in its bonding up to extreme pressures. Our results provide constraints on the carbon equation of state, which is of critical importance for devising models of Neptune, Uranus and white dwarf stars, as well as of extra-solar carbon-rich planets.
Date: February 9, 2006
Creator: Schwegler, E; Ogitsu, T; Bonev, S; Correa, A; Militzer, B & Galli, G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Coupled Turbulenc/Transport Model for Edge-Plasmas

Description: An edge-plasma simulation for tokamak fusion devices is developed that couples 3D turbulence and 2D transport, including detailed sources and sinks, to determine self-consistent steady-state plasma profiles. Relaxed iterative coupling is shown to be effective when edge turbulence is partially suppressed, for example, by shear E x B shear flow as occurs during the favorable H-mode region. Unsuppressed turbulence is found to lead to large, intermittent edge transport events where the coupling procedure can lead to substantial inaccuracies in describing the true time-averaged plasma behavior.
Date: February 9, 2006
Creator: Rognlien, T; Cohen, R; LoDestro, L; Palasek, R; Umansky, M & Xu, X
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Engineering of Electrodialysis Membranes 03-ERD-060

Description: Using a combination of modeling and experimental work we have developed a new method for purifying water that uses less energy than conventional methods and that can be made selective for removing targeted contaminants. The method uses nanoporous membranes that are permselective for anion or cation transfer. Ion selectivity results from double layer overlap inside the pores such that they dominantly contain ions opposite in charge to the surface charge of the membrane. Membrane charge can be adjusted through functionalization. Experiments confirm membrane permselectivity and overall energy use less than that for conventional electrodialysis. The nanoporous membranes are used in a conventional electrodialysis configuration and can be incorporated in existing electrodialysis systems without modification. The technology merits further development and testing in real systems, and could result in a significant reduction in water treatment costs.
Date: February 22, 2006
Creator: Bourcier, W; O'Brien, K; Sawvel, A; Johnson, M; Bettencourt, K; Letant, S et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Radiation Biodosimetry LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-ERD-076

Description: In the event of a nuclear or radiological accident or terrorist event, it is important to identify individuals that can benefit from prompt medical care and to reassure those that do not need it. Achieving these goals will maximize the ability to manage the medical consequences of radiation exposure that unfold over a period of hours, days, weeks, years, depending on dose. Medical interventions that reduce near term morbidity and mortality from high but non-lethal exposures require advanced medical support and must be focused on those in need as soon as possible. There are two traditional approaches to radiation dosimetry, physical and biological. Each as currently practiced has strengths and limitations. Physical dosimetry for radiation exposure is routine for selected sites and for individual nuclear workers in certain industries, medical centers and research institutions. No monitoring of individuals in the general population is currently performed. When physical dosimetry is available at the time of an accident/event or soon thereafter, it can provide valuable information in support of accident/event triage. Lack of data for most individuals is a major limitation, as differences in exposure can be significant due to shielding, atmospherics, etc. A smaller issue in terms of number of people affected is that the same dose may have more or less biological effect on subsets of the population. Biological dosimetry is the estimation of exposure based on physiological or cellular alterations induced in an individual by radiation. The best established and precise biodosimetric methods are measurement of the decline of blood cells over time and measurement of the frequency of chromosome aberrations. In accidents or events affecting small numbers of people, it is practical to allocate the resources and time (days of clinical follow-up or specialists laboratory time) to conduct these studies. However, if large numbers of people have been ...
Date: February 3, 2006
Creator: Jones, I M; A.Coleman, M; Lehmann, J; Manohar, C F; Marchetti, F; Mariella, R et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY2005 Progress Summary and FY2006 Program Plan Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers, and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

Description: The primary focus this year was to operate the system with two amplifiers populated with and pumped by eight high power diode arrays. The system was operated for extended run periods which enabled average power testing of components, diagnostics, and controls. These tests were highly successful, with a demonstrated energy level of over 55 joules for 4 cumulative hours at a repetition rate of 10 Hz (average power 0.55 kW). In addition, high average power second harmonic generation was demonstrated, achieving 227 W of 523.5 nm light (22.7 J, 10 Hz, 15 ns, 30 minutes) Plans to achieve higher energy levels and average powers are in progress. The dual amplifier system utilizes a 4-pass optical arrangement. The Yb:S-FAP slabs were mounted in aerodynamic aluminum vane structures to allow turbulent helium gas flow across the faces. Diagnostic packages that monitored beam performance were deployed during operation. The laser experiments involved injecting a seed beam from the front end into the system and making four passes through both amplifiers. Beam performance diagnostics monitored the beam on each pass to assess system parameters such as gain and nearfield intensity profiles. This year, an active mirror and wavefront sensor were procured and demonstrated in an off-line facility. The active mirror technology can correct for low order phase distortions at user specified operating conditions (such as repetition rates different than 10 Hz) and is a complementary technology to the static phase plates used in the system for higher order distortions. A picture of the laser system with amplifier No.2 (foreground) and amplifier No.1 (background) is shown in Fig. 1.0.1.1. The control system and diagnostics were recently enhanced for faster processing and allow remote operation of the system. The growth and fabrication of the Yb:S-FAP slabs constituted another major element of our program objectives. Our goal ...
Date: March 24, 2006
Creator: Ebbers, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report Technology Basis for Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain (FIND)

Description: Work performed as a part of this ER sets the foundation for applications of high brightness light sources to important homeland security and nonproliferation problems. Extensive modeling has been performed with the aim to understand the performance of a class of interrogation systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes, of particular importance for national security and industry.
Date: February 13, 2006
Creator: Barty, C J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY005 Accomplishments for Colony Project

Description: The Colony Project is developing operating system and runtime system technology to enable efficient general purpose environments on tens of thousands of processors. To accomplish this, we are investigating memory management techniques, fault management strategies, and parallel resource management schemes. Recent results show promising findings for scalable strategies based on processor virtualization, in-memory checkpointing, and parallel aware modifications to full featured operating systems.
Date: July 5, 2005
Creator: Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Inglett, T et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report A Computational Design Tool for Microdevices and Components in Pathogen Detection Systems

Description: We have developed new algorithms to model complex biological flows in integrated biodetection microdevice components. The proposed work is important because the design strategy for the next-generation Autonomous Pathogen Detection System at LLNL is the microfluidic-based Biobriefcase, being developed under the Chemical and Biological Countermeasures Program in the Homeland Security Organization. This miniaturization strategy introduces a new flow regime to systems where biological flow is already complex and not well understood. Also, design and fabrication of MEMS devices is time-consuming and costly due to the current trial-and-error approach. Furthermore, existing devices, in general, are not optimized. There are several MEMS CAD capabilities currently available, but their computational fluid dynamics modeling capabilities are rudimentary at best. Therefore, we proposed a collaboration to develop computational tools at LLNL which will (1) provide critical understanding of the fundamental flow physics involved in bioMEMS devices, (2) shorten the design and fabrication process, and thus reduce costs, (3) optimize current prototypes and (4) provide a prediction capability for the design of new, more advanced microfluidic systems. Computational expertise was provided by Comp-CASC and UC Davis-DAS. The simulation work was supported by key experiments for guidance and validation at UC Berkeley-BioE.
Date: February 7, 2006
Creator: Trebotich, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY05 LDRD Final Report, A Revolution in Biological Imaging

Description: X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are currently under development and will provide a peak brightness more than 10 orders of magnitude higher than modern synchrotrons. The goal of this project was to perform the fundamental research to evaluate the possibility of harnessing these unique x-ray sources to image single biological particles and molecules at atomic resolution. Using a combination of computational modeling and experimental verification where possible, they showed that it should indeed be possible to record coherent scattering patterns from single molecules with pulses that are shorter than the timescales for the degradation of the structure due to the interaction with those pulses. They used these models to determine the effectiveness of strategies to allow imaging using longer XFEL pulses and to design validation experiments to be carried out at interim ultrafast sources. They also developed and demonstrated methods to recover three-dimensional (3D) images from coherent diffraction patterns, similar to those expected from XFELs. The images of micron-sized test objects are the highest-resolution 3D images of any noncrystalline material ever formed with x-rays. The project resulted in 14 publications in peer-reviewed journals and four records of invention.
Date: January 20, 2006
Creator: Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Balhorn, R; Barty, A; Barsky, D; Bogan, M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department