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The Work of the Agricultural Experiment Stations

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Better Cows for the Dairy, Fibrin in Milk, Bacteria in Milk, Silos and Silage, Alfalfa, and Field Experiments with Fertilizers.
Date: 1890
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Description: "The breeds of chickens included in the Asiatic, English, and French classes are in the main of a relatively large size, and have been developed primarily as meat breeds. They are not so commonly kept in this country [the United States] as either the general-purpose or the egg breeds. The best-known meat breeds in the United States are those of the Asiatic class. However, the breeds of the English and French classes, while averaging somewhat smaller in size than those of the Asiatic class, were developed for their table qualities and therefore are popularly grouped among the meat breeds. In the opinion of many persons the Sussex and Orpington breeds, both English, are general-purpose breeds. The Orpington, in particular, is a fairly common and popular farm fowl in the United States. The best-known section of the United States in which large table fowls of superior quality are produced in considerable quantities is the South Shore distrct of Massachusetts, near Boston. The chicks are hatched in the fall or early winter, and both males and females are grown to a good size and marketed as South Shore roasters. The males usually are caponized, but are marketed as roasters rather than capons, and the pullets are marketed before they begin to lay." -- p. 2. These and other breeds of the Asiatic, English, and French classes of chickens are discussed.
Date: 1919
Creator: Slocum, Rob R. (Rob Roy), 1883-1944
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Description: Revised edition. "The breeds of chickens included in the Asiatic, English, and French classes are in the main of a relatively large size, and have been developed primarily as meat breeds. They are not so commonly kept in this country [the United States] as either the general-purpose or the egg breeds. The best-known meat breeds in the United States are those of the Asiatic class. However, the breeds of the English and French classes, while averaging somewhat smaller in size than those of the Asiatic class, were developed for their table qualities and therefore are popularly grouped among the meat breeds. In the opinion of many persons the Sussex and Orpington breeds, both English, are general-purpose breeds. The Orpington, in particular, is a fairly common and popular farm fowl in the United States. The best-known section of the United States in which large table fowls of superior quality are produced in considerable quantities is the South Shore distrct of Massachusetts, near Boston. The chicks are hatched in the fall or early winter, and both males and females are grown to a good size and marketed as South Shore roasters. The males usually are caponized, but are marketed as roasters rather than capons, and the pullets are marketed before they begin to lay." -- p. 2. These and other breeds of the Asiatic, English, and French classes of chickens are discussed.
Date: 1921
Creator: Slocum, Rob R. (Rob Roy), 1883-1944
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost of Using Horses on Corn-Belt Farms

Description: "The purpose of this bulletin is to present information on the cost of using horses in the Corn Belt that will acquaint the farmer with the extent of this yearly expense and suggest methods by which this time may be reduced on many farms." -- p. 1.
Date: 1922
Creator: Cooper, M. R. (Martin Reese), b. 1887 & Williams, J. O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Poultry Accounts

Description: "A definite record of expenditures and receipts is one of the greatest needs of many poultry keepers. This bulletin gives a simple systems of keeping poultry accounts adapted either for a small flock or for a large poultry farm. Combined with this system of accounting is a detailed statement of expenditures and receipts and an inventory of the necessary equipment for operating a 1,500-hen commercial poultry farm. The records advised are simple, consisting of a monthly statement sheet, a yearly summary sheet, an inventory sheet, a balance sheet, and a daily egg record." -- p. ii
Date: 1924
Creator: Lee, Alfred R., b. 1887 & Haynes, Sheppard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Power for the Farm from Small Streams

Description: "The purpose of this bulletin is to acquaint farmers with the possibilities of developing the power of small streams by converting it into electrical energy and the uses to which such power can be put; to give information which will enable them to avoid unnecessary expenditures; to explain how to determine the power a stream will supply; and to indicate the sources from which to secure additional information in regard to the approximate cost of installing a plant suited to the power available. The details of design, installation, and operation of electrical equipment are not within the scope of this bulletin." -- p. ii
Date: 1925
Creator: Daniels, A. M.; Seitz, C. E. & Glenn, J. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Soil Productivity As Affected by Crop Rotation

Description: This bulletin discusses the effect of crop rotation practices on soil productivity, and also describes the possible effects of fertilizers and other forms of soil improvement. "The purposes of the discussion which follows are to emphasize the value of crop rotation in farming economy and to stress the principles of rotation in their relation to the maintenance of soil productivity and to soil improvement." -- p. 5
Date: 1926
Creator: Weir, Wilbert W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Forage Crops and Their Culture in Northern Nebraska and the Dakotas

Description: "This bulletin deals with those cultivated forage crops that seem of greatest promise for the dry-farming districts of northern Nebraska and the Dakotas west of the ninety-eighth meridian. Frequent crop failures in the more arid portions of these States result from a low annual precipitation, the irregularity of its amount and distribution during the growing season, and high evaporation. Under conditions of extreme drought, cultivated crops can seldom be economically substituted for native vegetation, and the utilization of such lands for grazing and the cutting of wild hay is most generally advisable. Greater forage production on the better lands may be effected by growing certain cultivated legumes, grasses, and roots." -- p. ii.
Date: 1927
Creator: Garver, Samuel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rabbit Skins for Fur

Description: "With the disappearance of many of the fine-pelted wild fur bearers from certain parts of the United States, the use of rabbit skins is steadily increasing. Aided by modern processes, American fur dressers and dyers have become so expert in changing the colors and appearances of furs that in many instances the pelt of the rabbit, under a variety of trade names, is replacing many that are more attractive and costly.... Methods of handling rabbit skins, from the time the pelt is removed until it reaches the raw-fur market or is tanned for home use, are described in this bulletin." -- p. ii
Date: 1927
Creator: Green, D. Monroe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Propagation of Game Birds

Description: "Success in the propagation of game birds has been enjoyed in the United States by individuals, by sportsmen's organizations, and by State game departments. There have been failures, of course, but methods that assure success are known. These are treated concisely in this bulletin.... Developed methods need only be carried out with energy and intelligence to produce satisfactory results. Raising game birds may be made profitable, since the demand exceeds the supply of adult birds for breeding, of both young and and adults for restocking, and of eggs for distribution to farmers and shooting clubs." -- p. ii. Among the birds discussed are pheasants, quail, partridges, grouse, turkeys, ducks, geese, and swans.
Date: 1927
Creator: McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Removing Spray Residue From Apples and Pears

Description: This bulletin gives instructions for removing spray residue from apples and pears. "Control of the codling moth has become essential in the production of marketable apples and pears in practically all deciduous-fruit districts of the United States, and through spraying with lead-aresenate has been for many years the accepted control method. Apples and pears sprayed with lead arsenate bear at harvest time an arsenical residue, and this residue must be removed in the interest of public health." -- p. 1
Date: 1931
Creator: Diehl, H. C.; Lutz, J. M. (Jacob Martin), 1908-1968 & Ryall, A. Lloyd (Albert Lloyd), 1904-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improving the Farm Environment for Wild Life

Description: This bulletin discusses how farmers can improve their environment for wild life and game animals. Farmers should provide cover for wild life, ensure an adequate and continuous food supply, and take measures to protect wild life from farm operations, birds of prey, cats and dogs, diseases, etc.
Date: 1934
Creator: Grange, Wallace B. (Wallace Byron), 1905-1987 & McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Description: "The use of lespedeza as a farm crop has rapidly increased during the past few years. The increase in the use of lespedeza is due partly to the excellent results that have been obtained by the farmers who have been growing the Common variety, for hay and for pasture and soil improvement, but more particularly to the introduction of some new varieties that produce better yields, are adapted to a wider range of climatic conditions, and are generally better suited to the needs of the average farm than is the Common variety. This bulletin is based on information collected from farmers located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky who are growing lespedeza regularly as a farm crop. The information includes methods of seeding, varieties used, the place in the cropping system usually occupied by lespedeza, and practices that have developed in connection with the production and use of the crop in these States." -- p. 1
Date: 1934
Creator: Miller, H. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hotbeds and Coldframes

Description: This bulletin describes the uses of hotbeds and coldframes in starting early plants. The hotbeds discussed include manure hotbeds, fuel-heated beds, and electric heating in beds and greenhouses. Coverings and care and maintenance are also discussed. Possible plants for early growth include tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squashes, cucumbers, muskmelons, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and celery.
Date: 1935
Creator: W. R. (William Renwick) Beattie, b. 1870
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preventing Soil Blowing on the Southern Great Plains

Description: "Soil blowing is often a serious problem from December to May [in the Southern Great Plains], when the soil is, in many cases, bare and winds are high. This period is often referred to as the 'blow season.' The whole art of preventing and controlling soil blowing consists in keeping nonblowing materials on the surface. These may be crops, crop residues, or clods. When crops are absent, the essential feature in preventing soil blowing is the use of implements that lift clods and other nonblowing materials to the surface rather than implements that pulverize or destroy them.... Since tillage is dependent on implements, it seems of first importance to consider the implements that may be used to discuss their merits and shortcomings in relation to soil blowing.... From the general principles stated and the specific examples of implement use given, most farmers can probably decide on the correct applications for their farms." -- p. 1-3
Date: 1937
Creator: Chilcott, E. F. (Ellery Franklin), 1885-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Farmer Looks Ahead

Description: This bulletin provides criteria by which farmers may determine how much they should plan to produce in a given year. There "are four major yardsticks: 1) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of the requirements of domestic consumers, plus; 2) What they can expect to ship to foreign countries in the next few years? 3) How much should they produce, thinking only of the requirements of soil conservation? 4) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of their incomes?" -- p. 3
Date: 1937
Creator: United States. Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscadine Grapes

Description: "Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscadine Grapes

Description: Revised edition. "Muscadine grapes, which are native to the southeastern part of the United States, thrive in most soils of that region. They can be grown successfully in the Southeastern States, where American bunch grapes do not thrive. furthermore, they are suitable for home gardens as well as for commercial use. In fact they are perhaps the most satisfactory of all fruits for the home garden in this region. They cannot be grown, hoever, where temperatures as low as 0 °F occur habitually and may be injured at somewhat higher temperatures. Muscadine grapes are relatively uninjured by diseases and insects and produce well with a minimum of care, but they resopnd favorably to the good cultural practices recommended in this bulletin. The varieties described or listed produce fruit suitable for making unfermented juice, wine, jelly, and other culinary products and for eating fresh over a long season." -- p. ii
Date: 1947
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Description: "Erosion has left scars on a majority of farms in the Southeast. Too poor to produce crops, the eroding spots are usually abandoned. Unless they are treated to stop further washing of the soil they grow steadily larger and continually rob the farmer of more of his land. Fortunately, soil conservation and wildlife management can be effectively combined, and otherwise worthless areas made to produce a crop of game, fur bearers, and other desirable types of wildlife. The general principles of wildlife management on the farm are described in Farmers' Bulletins 1719 and 1759. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how gullies, terrace outlets, waterways, eroding field borders, pastures, and woodlands in the Piedmont region may be protected against erosion through the use of vegetation that will also provide food and cover for wildlife." -- p. ii
Date: 1937
Creator: Stevens, Ross O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Terracing for Soil and Water Conservation

Description: This bulletin describes terracing methods that are able to combat soil erosion and conserve water. There are three types of terraces (drainage, absorptive, and bench) and plans, specifications, construction practices are provided in the bulletin.
Date: 1938
Creator: Hamilton, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Implements and Methods of Tillage to Control Soil Blowing on the Northern Great Plains

Description: This bulletin tools and methods of tilling which can help reduce or control soil blowing and soil erosion on farms in the northern Great Plains of the United States. Among the crops discussed with relation to tilling methods are beans, corn, sorghum, potatoes, alfalfa, and sweet clover.
Date: 1938
Creator: Cole, John S. (John Selden) & Morgan, George W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department