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The Sandia APAR-3G system: Automatic Programming, Recording, and Control for Development and Production Testing

Description: Abstract: The APAR-3G system is an automatic programming, controlling and recording machine which is readily adaptable to a wide variety of automated data acquisition and constrol system applications. It is physically and logically modular to permit the assemby of minimum or maximum capability machines. This system can perform the necessary acquisition and control in a typical factory environment and can generate an output (for data reduction) which is compatible with available computer systems.
Date: December 1963
Creator: Roberts, R. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SOLSTOR Description and User's Guide

Description: Abstract: This report describes the computer simulation code SOLSTOR. The code simulates energy systems in which electricity is generated by either a photovoltaic (PV) system or a wind turbine generator (WTG). Storage may or may not be present. Backup electricity, if needed, is provided either from a utility grid or from a fuel-burning generator. SOLSTOR minimizes the life cycle cost of providing energy by choosing the optimal solar or wind system component sizes. Rates for electricity purchased from the grid can include time-of-day (TOD) energy charges as well as time-of-day peak demand changes. Sell-back to the grid of excess collected energy is also considered.
Date: March 1981
Creator: Aronson, Eugene A.; Caskey, David L. & Caskey, Bill C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectrographic Analysis of Plasmajets: Progress Report 2

Description: Abstract: This is the second progress report on the work performed at Sandia Corporation in the use of spectrographic techniques in plasmajet diagnostics. Typical results of spectrographic data from argon and nitrogen plasmajets are included. For the argon jet, the results from line intensity measurements of ionized and unionized atoms generally give good information. However, results from hydrogen line broadening measurements indicate several unexplained discrepancies. For the nitrogen jet, the N2 (0, 0) and N2 (0, 1) bands from the first negative series were used to determine a rotational temperature.
Date: March 1963
Creator: Shipley, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Explosive Ditching from Linear Charges

Description: Abstract: "Weights of linear high-explosive charges fired on the Yucca Lake playa of the Nevada Test Site varied from 0.23 to 42.7 pounds per foot. Crater and ditch dimensions and volumes resulting from these shots, fired during the fall of 1959 and spring of 1960, are presented here as a function of charge burst depths. Scaling relationships determined are as expected; i.e., square-root scaling of linear-charge weight per foot for ditch width and depth and a direct linear-charge weight relationship to ditch volume are obtained. Permanent ground surface displacement varies as the -3.22 power of the scaled distance from the charge. Detonation effects, charge shape effects, ditch erosion, and ditch cross sections are discussed. The appendixes present Toboggan data, results of soil investigation, and mathematical treatment given the data."
Date: July 1961
Creator: Carlson, R. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Salton Sea Meteorological Instrumentation Test Series, Salton Sea, California, Conducted in September 1959

Description: Abstract: "This report discusses tests conducted to determine the accuracy of meteorological equipment which is used to gather upper air data. Equipment tested was the GMD-2, SMD-1A, GMD-1B, and the WBRT-57. A four-station phototheodolite network was used as a standard for point-in-space determinations."
Date: January 1961
Creator: Jones, L. E.; Levesque, R. L., Jr.; Niper, E. D. & Willis, John T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Explosive Crater Studies: Tuff

Description: Abstract: "Spherical charges of TNT, each weighing 256 pounds, were exploded at various depths in tuff to determine apparent crater dimensions in a soft rock. No craters were obtained for depths of burst equal to or greater than 13.3 feet. It was deduced that rock fragments were sufficiently large that charges of greater magnitude should be employed for crater experiments intended as models of nuclear explosions."
Date: April 1961
Creator: Murphey, Byron F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of a Pebble-Bed-Storage Heater for a Hypersonic Wind Tunnel

Description: Abstract: "The pressure drop and the time-temperature variation of the air test medium and heat storage material in a pebble-bed heater (designed for intermittent hypersonic wind-tunnel operation at test section Mach numbers of 4 to 11) are presented."
Date: May 1961
Creator: Randall, D. E. & Bedford, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Project Scooter: Final Report, October 1963

Description: From abstract: This report includes results of studies of crater dimension, throwout material distribution, ground motion, dust cloud growth, and long-range air blast.
Date: October 1963
Creator: Perret, William R.; Chabai, Albert J.; Reed, Jack W. & Vortman, Luke J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Explosive Crater Studies: Desert Alluvium

Description: From abstract: Crater dimensions have been determined for 23 explosions of 256-pound spherical TNT charges buried in desert alluvium. As opposed to previous work covering depths of burst as great as 6 feet, the work presented in this report extends knowledge of apparent crater radius and depth to depths of burst as great as 30 feet.
Date: May 1961
Creator: Murphey, Byron F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stress Pulse-Trains from Multiple Reflection at a Zone of Many Discontinuities: a Notation for Machine Solution

Description: Abstract: "Presented in this report is a numerical method by which may be calculated the amplitudes of the trains of pulses that result when a single simple stress pulse encounters a zone of many abrupt discontinuities in a slender rod. The notational scheme employed enables the system of multitudes of individual progagating waves to be studied in terms of analogous number sets which may be mechanically generated. The notational concept and related operational rules, described in this report, have been used to program the problem for solution with the IBM 704 computer. The program is briefly discussed. Illustrative examples were computed for rods of two to ten discontinuities. These were compared with a pulse reflected in a rod of an unlimited number of steps."
Date: August 1962
Creator: Reed, R. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irreducible Representations of Line Groups: the Dynamics of Polymer Chains

Description: Abstract: "The symmetries of infinite polymer chain molecules are discussed using the concept of line groups. Explicit directions are given for obtaining the irreducible representations of line groups employing the formalism developed for three-dimensional space groups. Line groups containing primitive and nonprimitive operations are discussed. Detailed considerations of the line group Vh are given with specific applications to the polyethylene molecule. Directions for generating symmetry-adapted vibrational coordinates for chain molecules are outlined."
Date: December 1961
Creator: Lawson, Katheryn Emanuel & Crosby, G. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Scale-Model Experiment of the Crater Produced Through Terrain of Randomly Varying Elevation by Row Charges

Description: Abstract: "A scale-model experiment was made to check the application of charge spacing rules developed from earlier studies to terrain of randomly varying elevation. Since a prominent possible peacetime use of nuclear explosives is the excavation of a trans-Isthmian canal, the model used was a portion of such a route. The experiment resulted in nearly the desired linear crater dimensions; the spacing rules developed for level trerain give a satisfactory channel when applied to terrain with elevations varying in random fashion."
Date: November 1962
Creator: Vortman, Luke J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Construction of a Sea-Level, Transisthmian Canal Using Nuclear Explosives

Description: Partial abstract: "This report is based: (1) on information developed in earlier high explosive experiments which determined the optimum spacing and burial depth of charges in a row to produce a channel uniformly wide and deep, and (2) on the Sedan and Danny Boy experiments, which provided data on dimensions of nuclear craters in both soil and basalt rock. This information has been combined with the 1947 route surveys of the Panama Canal company, and estimates have been made not only of the number and yield of nuclear explosives required to excavate a Transisthmian canal with nuclear explosives, but also of the cost of the explosives and the cost of their replacement."
Date: February 1964
Creator: Vortman, Luke J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating Safety Probabilities from Fallout Forecasts for Nevada Test Site

Description: Abstract: "Available data on wind persistence and wind forecasting capability have been applied in estimating the probability of a fallout pattern shifting from an uninhabited safe sector into a populated region. Safety probability is computed from win variability, forecasting accuracy, initial height and particle size of radioactivity landing at a point in the predicted fallout pattern, predicted wind speed, length of forecast period, and safe-sector angular width."
Date: July 1, 1960
Creator: Reed, Jack W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study of Nevada Test Site Wind Variability

Description: Abstract: "Wind observations collected at Yucca Flat since 1951 are analyzed for timewise variability. Variability functions of altitude, season, wind speed, and vector wind are described. Derived variability parameters are incorporated into calculations of fallout safety probability for NTS operations."
Date: July 1, 1960
Creator: Reed, Jack W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental Pressure Distributions and Force Coefficients on Block Forms for Varying Mach Number, Reynolds Number, and Yaw Angle

Description: Abstact: "Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressure distributions and normal force coefficients on three block forms on mounting planes. The dimension ratios of the blocks were 1:1:1, 1:1:2, and 1:1:4. Results are given for variation in Mach number from 0.066 to 0.8, in Reynolds number from 0.28 x 10(exp 6) to 4 x 10(exp 6), and in yaw angle from 0 to 90 degrees. Results show a Reynolds number independence over the range examined. Windward face force coefficients for a given block form are approximately proportional to the ratio of impact to dynamic pressure. Pressure distribution and resultant coefficients are affected by mounting planes."
Date: January 1959
Creator: Hankins, Dorris M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Exploding Wire as a Fuse for the LASL Capacitor Bank--Zeus

Description: Abstract: "An exploding copper wire, one millimeter in diameter, 30 centimeters long, has been developed as a fuse component for a Los Alamos capacitor energy source to be employed in controlled thermonuclear research studies. The fuse allows the passage of the high normal duty "action" (13,700 ampere-coulombs per capacitor) at a 20-second repetition rate. However, it interrupts the circuit to a shorted capacitor in 12 microseconds, thereby protecting the faulted capacitor from explosive energy consumption. The initial phase of the development included observations of various metals (copper, silver, iron, and nickel) as well as various configurations (straight wires, helixes, foils, and tubes). Direct scaling of previous small exploding wire studies at Sandia Corporation was demonstrated with scaling factors up to 700,000."
Date: June 4, 1959
Creator: Cnare, Eugene C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department