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Reconnaissance for Radioactive Deposits in Southeastern Alaska, 1952

Description: From abstract: Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in southeastern Alaska in 1952 was centered in three localities: the northern part of Prince of Wales Island and parts of adjacent islands, the Taku Harbor-Point Astley district, and the Hyder area. Significant concentrations of radioactive minerals were found only in the vicinity of Salmon Bay on the northeastern shore of Prince of Wales Island. In this area radioactive carbonate-hematite veins occur along the coast for about 8 miles. The veins are generally short, irregular, and lenticular, but a few can be traced for more than 300 feet between the low-tide line and the forest cover. The width of the veins normally ranges from less than 1 inch to 2.5 feet; several, however, are 5 to 10 feet wide.
Date: 1958
Creator: Houston, Joseph R.; Bates, Robert Glenn; Velikanje, Robert S. & Wedow, Helmuth, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Ore Deposits of Northwestern Chichagof Island, Alaska

Description: From introduction: The area of this report is in the northern part of southeastern Alaska (fig. 39). It includes about 400 square miles on northwestern Chichagof Island, latitude 5747' to 58*15' N. and longitude 135 57' to 136 35' W. It is covered by U. S. Geological Survey Mount Fairweather A-1, A-2, and Sitka D--7 and D-8 topographic quadrangle maps. The writer's geologic investigation was started in 1946 as a continuation of earlier work on the west coast of Chichagof Island by J. C. Reed and R. R. Coats (1941) of the U. S. Geological Survey.
Date: 1959
Creator: Rossman, Darwin Lucian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Coal Resources of the Homer District, Kenai Coal Field, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Homer district of the Kenai coal field is about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, in south-central Alaska. It covers an area of about 1,100 square miles on the west side of the Kenai Peninsula, between Tustumena Lake and Kachemak Bay. The principal settlement is Homer, at the southern end of the district, which is connected by the gravel-surfaced Sterling Highway with the Alaska highway system and The Alaska Railroad, and is also served by ocean transportation and one airline.
Date: 1959
Creator: Barnes, Farrell F. & Cobb, Edward H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Coal Resources of the Little Susitna District, Matanuska Coal Field, Alaska

Description: From introduction: This report is based on preliminary surface mapping in the summer of 1952 and on subsurface exploration with a bulldozer powerauger unit in the summers of 1953 and 1954. In 1952 F. F. Barnes was assisted by Alfred Oestreich, geologist, and Lewis Ladwig and Richard Pack, field assistants. From July 2 to August 31, 1953, F. F. Barnes and Daniel Sokol were assisted by W.T. Ashlock and R. E. Rowland, field assistants, and by a bulldozer operator-mechanic. From June 23 to July 27, 1954, Barnes and Sokol were assisted by A. E. Burford and W. S. Hopkins, geologists, and an operator-mechanic.
Date: 1959
Creator: Barnes, Farrell F. & Sokol, Daniel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kodiak and Adjacent Islands, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Kodiak group of islands, having an area of 4,900 square miles, lie on the Pacific Ocean side of the base of the Alaska Peninsula. Although the town of Kodiak is the oldest continuously occupied white settlement in Alaska, the interior of many of the islands is still little explored and unmapped, for the heavy growth of vegetation makes inland travel difficult, and few trails penetrate far from the coast.
Date: 1937
Creator: Capps, Stephen Reid
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kodiak and Vicinity Alaska

Description: From abstract: Kodiak Island, although the site of the earliest white settlement in Alaska and the center of a vigorous fishing industry, is still largely unexplored, except for a strip immediately adjacent to the shores. The heavy growth of vegetation makes access to the interior of the island difficult, and few trails penetrate far from the coast. Mining activity in the past has been confined to somewhat desultory exploitation of beach sands, which in places carry gold, though some gold-bearing lodes have been staked, and a few unsuccessful attempts at lode mining have been made.
Date: 1937
Creator: Capps, Stephen R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Kaiyuh Hills, Alaska

Description: From introduction: The present report states the results of an exploratory survey of the Kaiyuh Hills during the summer of 1934.
Date: 1937
Creator: Mertie, John Beaver, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Willow Creek-Kashwitna District, Alaska

Description: From introduction: The district described in this report is a triangular area covering about 300 square miles in the southwestern part of the Talkeetna Mountains. The Kashwitna River forms the northern boundary, the Susitna Valley flats the western, and the Willow Creek gold district, which is in the extreme southwestern part of the Talkeetna Mountains, the southern. As the area examined is not a distinct geographic unit, its boundaries being arbitrarily chosen and set only by the limitation of time spent in the field, a description of its geography applies to practically the entire western and southern portions of the Talkeetna Mountains, of which it is a part.
Date: 1935
Creator: Capps, Stephen R. & Tuck, Ralph
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Upper Copper and Tanana Rivers, Alaska

Description: From introduction: Two field parties, one topographic, the other geologic, were engaged in making surveys in the section of the Alaska Range between the Nabesna and Big Tok Rivers in 1934. Most of the area surveyed was on the northeast side of the range, within a drainage area that is tributary to the Nabesna and Tanana Rivers, but it also included a small part of the Copper River Basin.
Date: 1934
Creator: Moffit, Fred H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Prince William Sound Region, Alaska

Description: From introduction: This paper describes the geology of the Prince William Sound region, a part of south-central Alaska. It deals with the rocks of a section of the Coast Ranges that has been studied by various geologists over a period of many years and still offers basic problems that are unsolved. Prince William Sound is well known for its mining activities, but the intention here is to describe the areal and stratigraphic geology of the district rather than its mineral resources and to present a statement that will serve as a report of progress and a basis for more detailed field work.
Date: 1954
Creator: Moffit, Fred H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Coal Deposits, Jarvis Creek Coal Field, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Jarvis Creek coal field lies on the north side of the Alaska Range, between latitudes 63 35' and 63*45' N., and longitudes 145*40' and 145*50' W. It is 3 to 6 miles east of the Richardson Highway. The coal field is about 16 square miles in area, the major part of which is a rolling plateau that slopes gently northward and is bounded on the east, south. and west by bluffs facing Jarvis Creek, Ruby Creek, and the Delta River.
Date: 1955
Creator: Wahrhaftig, Clyde & Hickcox, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Craig Quadrangle, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Craig quadrangle, in southeastern Alaska, lies entirely within the Tongass National Forest and includes a large part of Prince of Wales Island, the largest island of the Alexander Archipelago. Sedimentary, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age are exposed as complexly folded and faulted sequences. Paleozoic rocks occupy a broad geanticlinal area comprising Prince of Wales Island and the islands to the west. Metamorphosed Mesozoic rocks form a geosynclinal area along and east of Clarence Strait. Granitic and dioritic stocks and masses, mainly of Mesozoic age, intrude the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks. Remnants of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age exist on Suemez Island, and scattered areas of Tertiary clastic rocks and volcanic rocks are exposed near Clarence Strait. Deposits of Quaternary age are mainly thin glacial deposits and narrow bands of stream alluvium.
Date: 1961
Creator: Condon, W. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department