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The Nocturnes of Frédéric Chopin and Gabriel Fauré, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Other Composers for Piano

Description: The romantic piano literature contains three important collections of nocturnes. The nocturnes of John Field (1782-1837) were the first to appear, and were followed by collections from Frederic Chopin (1810-1849) and Gabriel Faure (1845-1924). While the relationship of the nocturnes of Field to those of Chopin is well documented, the corresponding relationship between Faure and Chopin is not. This study contains a detailed examination of this relationship, and shows the precise nature of Chopin's strong influence on Faure's early nocturnes, as well as the nature of Faure's growth from that influence. Chopin's influence was strongest in the area of harmonic language, as Faure carried certain of Chopin's techniques to logical extremes. Faure also adopted ternary form as the important form for the piece from Chopin. Faure's use of this form shows both similarities and differences from that found in Chopin. Faure's early nocturnes employ the same basic textures as Chopin's nocturnes, but Faure's later works abandon this in favor of increasingly contrapuntal writing. Chopin's influence is weakest in the area of melodic construction, as Faure's melodies often show a rigorous motivic construction which is not found in Chopin.
Date: December 1979
Creator: Roberson, Richard E.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Iberian Elements in the Sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti. A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of L.v. Beethoven, J.S. Bach, J. Brahms, and Selected Works of Other Composers

Description: The purpose of this paper is to identify Spanish elements in the sonatas of Domenico Scarlatti and to determine the extent of their use. All 555 sonatas in facsimile edition, edited by Ralph Kirkpatrick, were compared to the printed anthologies of Spanish folk music by Kurt Schindler and Felipe Pedrell as well as recordings of authentic Spanish folk music. The study concludes that Scarlatti incorporated Spanish musical elements extensively. In some sonatas, fragments of folk tunes occur, but always with some rhythmical alterations or melodic elaborations. Only K. 513 contains an entire folk tune. Scarlatti evidently wrote melodies of folk-like quality and did not merely copy the folk tunes.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Edwards, Donna O'Steen
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Copland's "Single Vision" and the Piano Sonata: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, B. Bartok, L.v. Beethoven, F. Chopin, F. Liszt, W.A. Mozart, J.P. Rameau, M. Ravel, and F. Schubert

Description: Difficulties are encountered in any discussion of Copland's style, for his works cover the spectrum from harsh, dissonant works to folk music. To avoid the task of defining a style which encompasses this array of vastly different pieces, a sharp distinction is frequently made between the abstract and popular works. However, Copland has repeatedly objected to such categorization, claiming that he composed from a single vision. A careful examination of his total output proves the validity of his claim. Many common characteristics are found throughout works from all categories and time periods. These traits include a basic economy of materials, emphasis on thirds, consistent method of development, use of declamation, jazz-influenced rhythms, cyclicism, and a slow/fast/slow sequence of movements, as well as within single movements. This document uses the Piano Sonata as a model of Copland's style, for it exemplifies these characteristics more clearly than any other major piece for piano. By making numerous comparisons with other works, Copland's single vision is revealed.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Morris, Gregory W. (Gregory Wayne)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Programmaticism in Carl Reinecke's Sonata, Opus 167, "Undine" a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of A. Vivaldi, J.S. Bach, G.P. Telemann, K.D. von Dittersdorf, C. Nielsen, F. Martin, J. Rivier, S. Prokofieff, O. Messiaen, M. Castelnuovo- Tedesco, N. Castiglioni, and E. Bozza

Description: The Lecture Recital was given on July 28, 1981. Its subject, Carl Reinecke's "Undine" Sonata, is a major work written for flute during the nineteenth century. Reinecke was highly respected as a conductor and pianist; his great love for the classical style tempered his Romanticism and conditioned his approach to both performance and composition. The subtitle of the sonata suggests a program based on Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué's short novel, Undine. Although few flutists are familiar enough with this tale to recognize its application to the sonata, an exploration of the program implied by the subtitle adds materially to an understanding and appreciation of the work; to a large extent, the content of each movement is conceived in terms of the program. Further examination of Reinecke's life and philosophy reveals that both the choice of this particular literary subject and the uniting of Romantic pictorialism with classical form were entirely characteristic of his writing. Since Reinecke specified no program other than the subtitle, any relating of the music to specific events in the story is necessarily a subjective postulation. The musical content of the work makes it fairly easy to establish a broad correspondence between the movements of the sonata and the progress of the story, however, leaving details to the individual imagination. Within the paper, the pictorial aspects of the music are explored in the belief that they can not only assist in an appreciation of the work, but also provide a guide to the performer for its interpretation.
Date: December 1981
Creator: Brown, Myrna W.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Symphony No. 1 "Concertante"

Description: Symphony No. 1 "Concertante" is a work of approximately twenty-two minutes duration for chamber orchestra. The work is scored for flute (doubling piccolo), oboe (doubling English horn), B-flat clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, F horn, trombone, tuba, percussion, harp, piano (doubling celesta), solo violin, solo viola, solo cello, solo double bass, and strings.The percussion battery, which is to be played by one performer, includes three timpani, vibraphone, orchestra bells, xylophone, chimes, suspended cymbal, bass drum, snare drum, and two triangles. One group of instruments, including the eight winds, percussion, and the four solo strings, is treated primarily in a soloistic manner although it also functions as a part of the ensemble. The remaining group, piano, harp, and strings, functions primarily as an accompanying group although it does get some soloistic treatment. The work is in four movements, each of which uses the traditional symphonic form. Movement I is in sonata-allegro form, movement II a simple ternary "song" form, movement III a scherzo and trio, and the final movement is a theme and variations. These traditional forms apply only to thematic use and development, however, for the tonal scheme is developed in a broader design which unfolds throughout the course of the four movements. All important melodic ideas are based on the same pitch set that serves as the basis for the tonal scheme.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Ring, Gordon L. (Gordon Lee)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Sydney Hodkinson's Megalith Trilogy: An Analysis: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Grigny, Bach, Duruflé, Scheidt, Dupré, Vierne, Reubke, and Others

Description: The lecture recital was given on July 2, 1984. The Megalith Trilogy was performed following a lecture which examined the internal structure of the work. The main body of the lecture focused on motivic and tonal considerations and included motivic and pitch reductions of the three movements. In addition to the lecture recital three other public solo recitals were performed. The four programs were recorded on magnetic tape and are filed with the written version of the lecture as a part of the dissertation.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Corbet, Antoinette Tracy
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Nineteenth-Century German Tradition of Solo Trombone Playing: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of E. Bozza, W. Hartley, A. Frackenpohl, A. Pryor. G. Frescobaldi. L. Grondahl, P. Bonneau and Others

Description: This study deals with trombone soloists and music of nineteenth-century Germany. Much of the discussion is based on the influence of two trombone virtuosos, Carl Traugott Queisser (1800-1846) and Friedrich August Belcke (1795- 1874) . Finally, a style and form analysis is given of several representative trombone compositions of the period. These include Ferdinand David's Concertino. Op. 4, Friedebald Grafe's Concerto. and Josef Serafin Alschausky's Concerto No. I.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Wolfinbarger, Steve M.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Six Odes by C.F. Gellert set by C.P.E. Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven: A Comparative Analysis, a Lecture Recital Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by Monteverdi, Caldara, Mozart, Brahms, Mendelssohn, Ives, Honegger, and Others

Description: The lecture recital was given on July 13, 1987. The discussion of the poetry by C. F. Gellert and the musical settings by C. P. E. Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven including analyses of all the pieces was followed by their performance. In addition to the lecture recital, three other public recitals were given: three of solo literature for voice and piano and one of vocal chamber literature. These included the works of Monteverdi, Caldara, Mozart, Brahms, Strauss, Mendelssohn, Ives, Honegger, Debussy, Faure", and others. All of these recitals were recorded on magnetic tape and filed along with the written version of the lecture material as a part of the dissertation.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Seelig, Timothy
Partner: UNT Libraries
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A Stylistic Comparison of Aaron Copland's Passacaglia, Piano variations, and Four piano Blues: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin and Others

Description: During Aaron Copland's long and productive life, he has written many compositions of distinction; among his piano compositions are the Passacaglia, Piano Variations, and Four Piano Blues. These three piano works were composed during a span of over twenty years and reflect many different influences in the composer's musical life. The Passacaglia, an early work, was written under the direction of Copland's teacher, Nadia Boulanger. It was strongly influenced by her and the French neoclassic school. The influence of jazz is most prominent in the Four Piano Blues, whereas the Piano Variations were influenced by Arnold Schoenberg and other composers of the twelve-tone school. This study contains an examination of each of three piano pieces mentioned, with emphasis upon aspects of thematic development, harmony, rhythm, and sonority; then a comparison between the pieces is made.
Date: May 1981
Creator: Whitten, Sammie G. (Sammie Gayle)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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A Performance Edition of Joseph Fiala's Concertante in B-Flat for Clarinet, Taille (English Horn) and Orchestra, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of W.A. Mozart, C. Debussy, D. Milhaud, J. Brahms, P. Hindemith, and Others

Description: Joseph Fiala (1754-1816) was a composer and performer of the classical period. His many compositions include manuscripts of a concerto for clarinet, taille, and orchestra in the Fürstlich Thurn und Taxis Hofbibliothek in Regensburg, West Germany and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. , U.S.A. This paper identifies the instrument called "taille" as the English horn and discusses the work in areas of form, harmony, rhythm, orchestration, and use of solo instruments. Comparison with contemporary works shows the piece is typical of the eighteenth-century symphonie concertante and, together with the composer's manuscript, provides a basis for editing of the solo parts.
Date: August 1983
Creator: Widder, David R.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Compositional Devices of Willem Pijper (1894-1947) and Henk Badings (b. 1907) in Two Selected Works, Pijper's "Sonata per Flauto e Pianoforte" (1925) and Badings' "Concerto for Flute and Wind Symphony Orchestra" (1963), a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Bach, Vivaldi, Dahl, Françaix, and Others

Description: Substantial contributions to flute literature of the twentieth century were made by the Dutch composers Willem Pijper (1894-1947) and Henk Badings (b. 1907) in the Sonata per Flauto e Pianoforte (1925) and the Concerto for Flute and Wind Symphony Orchestra (1963), respectively. This paper is an examination of the compositional devices employed by Pijper and Badings in these two selected works, with a discussion of the elements of form, tonal language, rhythm, motivic usage, orchestration, and innovative flute techniques. Emphasis on Pijper as teacher and mentor to a generation of Dutch composers, including Badings, gives the basis for a comparison of the Sonata and the Concerto.
Date: December 1980
Creator: Clardy, Mary Karen
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Motives, Allusions, and Eclecticism: A Panametric Analysis of the First Movement of Christian Lindberg's Mandrake in the Corner Based on the Method of Jan LaRue

Description: For more than 20 years, Christian Lindberg has been internationally recognized as the premiere trombone soloist of our time. Few, however, are familiar with his compositions. For over ten years, he has composed many solo and ensemble works for trombone. Many prominent musical organizations in the world have performed Lindberg's music, including the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and the University of North Texas Wind Ensemble. Today, Christian Lindberg has commission requests up to 2010. Christian Lindberg completed Mandrake in the Corner, a three movement concerto for trombone, in 1999. The purpose of this dissertation is to present an analysis of the first movement of Mandrake in the Corner to provide the first in depth study of Lindberg's compositional style. This analysis borrows freely from the method of Jan LaRue, which focuses on sound, harmony, melody, rhythm, and growth of musical structure on the small, middle, and large levels. The focus of this study centers on the aspects of melody, harmony, and rhythm to explain how the piece works despite the lack of a second theme or change of key in the first movement.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Underwood, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Choral Works of Robert Ward: A View of His Compositional Approach to Text Settings and His Use of Symbols and Allusions

Description: Robert Eugene Ward's impressive body of work encompasses almost every genre of music. He has composed symphonies, operas, large orchestral pieces, chamber works, solo instrumental pieces, extended choral works, short choral pieces, ceremonial works, a ballet, theatre pieces, and even jazz and swing band pieces. Ward's name is recognized in most musical circles but usually only for his opera The Crucible, a work for which he earned a Pulitzer Prize in 1962. In fact, a survey of all the dissertations, articles, interviews, and books written about Robert Ward shows that the vast majority of these studies focus on his most famous opera. His choral works, though they comprise some of Ward's most expressive work, have received little attention. Ward's works show a deliberate use of symbols and allusions. While this use is far from an innovative concept in composition, Ward distinguishes himself with a consistent and purposeful application of these devices establishing an unmistakable interweaving of text, composition, and context. This study examines several of Ward's short choral compositions as they relate to the composer's use of symbols and allusions. Comparisons are made to Ward's use of these devices in his operatic works as a means of determining the consistency of their use throughout his vocal works. Chapter 1 looks at the composer's background, influence, and experience as to their impact on his approach to composition. Chapter 2 lays the groundwork for the discussion of symbols and allusions in music by establishing their basis and function in literary arts in general. The final chapter explores Ward's use of symbols and allusions in four of his choral works.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Tucker, Carlton S.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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A Historical and Analytical Examination of the Stravinsky Octet for Wind Instruments, with a Guide to Performance Preparation of the Two Trumpet Parts

Description: The Octuor pour instruments a vents (or Octet), written in 1922-1923 by Igor Stravinsky, is a piece in three movements for a curious assortment of instruments: two trumpets, two trombones, flute, clarinet and two bassoons. It is one of four influential chamber works for winds by Stravinsky to include trumpet. Of these pieces, the Octet contains the fewest number of players but is no less complex and important in Stravinsky's oeuvre. The Octet helped mark the beginning of the neoclassical period in twentieth-century music. Chapter 2 examines the life and musical background of the composer. It also reveals the history surrounding the origin of the Octet and its role in neoclassicism. Chapter 3 discusses the role of the Octet in the wind ensemble and orchestral repertoire, and includes a representative performance history, including the premiere. Chapter 4 provides analytical insights into the construction and format of the piece. Chapter 5 provides suggestions regarding style in Stravinsky's music, including interviews with important figures in the trumpet world. Chapter 6 concludes the guide with specific suggestions regarding preparation and performance of the Octet.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Wood, James J.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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