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Texas Public School Principals' Application of Procedures in Identification and Prevention of Sexual Harassment

Description: The procedural survey on sexual harassment procedures sent to 300 Texas principals had a response rate of 48.3 %. The mean score on the procedural survey for all 300 principals was 69.30 %. Eighteen research questions were addressed in detail in Chapter 4. Only five showed a significant correlation or effect size. Question 5 asked if there was a correlation between gender and the mean score of the survey instrument regarding sexual harassment procedures. The mean score of women was significantly higher than men. Question 6 asked if there was a correlation between the number of students in a school and the mean score of the survey instrument regarding sexual harassment procedures. This revealed that a significant correlation appeared between principals who worked at larger schools. Question 10 asked if there was a correlation between the location of the school, whether rural, urban, or metroplex and the mean score of the survey instrument. Principals of urban and metroplex schools scored significantly higher. Question 13 asked if there was a correlation between the hours of sexual harassment training attended in the last year and the mean score of the survey instrument regarding sexual harassment procedures. The results of this analysis revealed that a correlation approaching a medium effect size of .237 was present. Question 18 asked if there was a correlation between the total number of hours a principal had attended training and the mean score of the survey instrument. Neither the Pearson's correlation or the Spearman's rho was statistically significant. However, due to the large variation in responses on the sum of hours of training about sexual harassment, it was suspected that there might be a covariate accounting for sub-populations within the principals who participated in the survey. For ages 30-43.5, as the number of total training hours increased, the ...
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Date: May 2002
Creator: Cramer, Conita K. Markel
Partner: UNT Libraries

Mentoring the first-year superintendent in Texas public schools.

Description: This study determined what mentoring experiences first-year superintendents have had and what they need from a mentoring relationship. Structured interviews and field notes were used in this qualitative study focused on Texas first-year superintendents' perceived needs from mentors. Three patterns of mentoring relationships were found: 1) no mentor in the first year, 2) mentor-protégé relationship - those who developed mentoring relationships early in a career with a more senior person in the same school system, and 3) mentoring relationships of convenience - young relationships which developed outside the same system. Skills and knowledge areas novice superintendents identified as critical for mentor assistance were school finance, development of effective relationships with groups that have expectations of the superintendent while also improving student achievement, and working within the politics of the position. Mentor characteristics novice superintendents considered necessary for a positive effect on job success include: trustworthiness, confidentiality, empathy, encouraging, active listening, and integrity. An attitude in which the mentor problem solved with the protégé, and did not give an immediate solution was displayed. Mentors actively and frequently initiated contact. Ideas were freely exchanged, giving the protégé undivided attention while not making the protégé feel inferior. The effects that previous mentoring experiences had on novice superintendents influenced whether they chose to mentor another person. Most reported seeking or engaged in a new mentoring relationship. Differences in areas where help was needed among first-year superintendents associated with district size were reported. Assistance in finance was needed regardless of district size, gender, or ethnicity. Superintendents in small districts reported needing assistance in specific skill and knowledge areas. Those in larger districts reported mentor assistance in problem-solving processes to accomplish a task. Differences in needs of first-year superintendents based on gender or ethnicity were identified but generalizations could not be made due to small numbers. ...
Date: May 2002
Creator: McNulty, Rock Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries

An examination of computer anxiety related to achievement on paper-and-pencil and computer-based aircraft maintenance knowledge testing of United States Air Force technical training students.

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine whether varying levels of computer anxiety have an effect on computer-based testing of United States Air Force technical training students. The first chapter presents an overview of computer-based testing, defines key terms, and identifies questions addressed in the research. The rationale for conducting this study was that little research had been done in this area. The second chapter contains a review of the pertinent literature related to computer-based testing, computer anxiety, test reliability, validity, and gender differences in computer use. Due to the lack understanding concerning any effects of computer anxiety on computer-based testing, this has been a worthwhile topic to explore, and it makes a significant contribution to the training field. The third chapter describes the qualitative research methodology used to conduct the study. The primary methodology was an analysis of variance comparison for groups of individuals who displayed high or low computer anxiety to their respective mean computer-based or paper-based aircraft maintenance knowledge testing scores. The research population consisted of United States Air Force aircraft maintenance craftsmen students attending training at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. The fourth chapter details the findings of the study. The findings indicate that there was no significant difference between the groups of students rated with high computer anxiety and low computer anxiety while testing with computers. Additionally, no significant differences were detected while testing alternative hypotheses covering differences between groups of students rated with high computer anxiety and low computer anxiety testing by traditional paper-and pencil methods. Finally, a reference section identifying the literature used in the preparation of this dissertation is also included.
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Date: May 2002
Creator: McVay, Richard B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Community College Student Success in Developmental Mathematics Courses: a Comparison of Four Instructional Methods

Description: The student success rates for three developmental mathematics courses (prealgebra, elementary algebra, and intermediate algebra) taught through four instructional methods (lecture, personalized system of instruction [PSI], hybrid, and online) were examined. The sample consisted of 9,211 students enrolled in a large Texas community college from fall 2009 through spring 2011. Student success was defined as a grade of C or better. Chi-square tests were used to compare the three developmental mathematics courses success rates. Statistically significant differences in student success were found between all four methods of instruction for all three mathematics courses (prealgebra: χ2 [df = 3] = 107.90, p < 0.001; elementary algebra: χ2 [df = 3] = 88.39, p < 0.001; intermediate algebra χ2 [df = 3] = 254.18, p < 0.001). Binary logistic regression modeling was used to determine to what extent age, gender, ethnicity, residency, Pell eligibility and mode of instruction accounted for the community college students’ course success for each of the three developmental mathematics courses. For prealgebra, the independent variables of gender, race, age, residency, and mode of instruction made statistically significant contributions to the model (χ2 [df = 14, n = 1,743] = 159.196, p < .001; Nagelkerke R2 = .119), with greater success among female, White, younger, out of country students taking the course through lecture. For elementary algebra, the independent variables of race, age, residency, and mode of instruction made statistically significant contributions to the logistic regression model (χ2 [df = 14, n = 2,731] = 816.223, p < .001; Nagelkerke R2 = .358), with greater success among , younger, out of country students taking the course through lecture, hybrid or PSI. For intermediate algebra, only race and Pell eligibility made a statistically significant contribution to the logistic regression, with greater success among White, Pell-eligible students, and mode of instruction ...
Date: May 2014
Creator: Keller, Judith
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Transition Experience of Second Career Respiratory Faculty: a Phenomenological Study

Description: This phenomenological study investigated the transition experiences of clinical respiratory therapists who pursued second careers as respiratory faculty. Situated Learning Theory and Workplace Learning Theory were the frameworks for interviews with 11 second career respiratory faculty who had taught fewer than five years in baccalaureate degree programs. The goal of this study was to identify the major themes of their experiences. Thematic analysis revealed five common experiences: under-preparation, challenges, overwhelmed feelings, personal responsibilities, and rewards. The common theoretical framework for all participants was the critical need to understand their communities of practice within their organizations. From this study, respiratory department chairs and administrators may better understand the challenges and needs of clinical therapists as they transition into faculty positions. Positive experiences such as improved orientations and continued effective faculty support may promote a more rewarding and long-term practice.
Date: May 2014
Creator: Gresham, Jennifer L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of Target Revenue Funding on Public School Districts in North Texas

Description: A pre–post case study was conducted to examine how target revenue funding from Texas House Bill 1 (2006) has impacted the school districts within the Texas Education Service Center Region X area. Forced by the courts, the Texas Legislature was required to fix the Texas school finance system because of a de facto statewide property tax it had created by capping school district’s maintenance & operations tax rate at $1.50. Texas Governor Rick Perry used this opportunity to reduce school district M&O taxes by one-third. The Texas Legislature passed House Bill 1 (2006), the Public School Finance and Property Tax Relief Act, in response to the courts and to address a continuous decline in state funding support for public education. The Public School Finance and Property Tax Relief Act reduced local school districts’ property tax rates and revenue with the assurance that these funds would be exchanged for state aid. Local school property taxes were reduced over two years, 2006–2007 and 2007-2008, by 33%. In order for the State of Texas to meet the state aid funding guarantee from House Bill 1 (2006), each school district was frozen to its 2005–2006 revenue per weighted student, which was called a district’s revenue target. This study examined the impact target revenue has had on these school districts by analyzing and comparing revenues and expenditures prior to and following the law’s implementation. Specifically, changes in per-student revenue, per-student expenditures, and district fund balances were assessed.
Date: May 2014
Creator: Womack, Dennis E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of Standards-based Report Cards on Reading Development of Primary Grade Students

Description: The purpose of this mixed-method study was to explore the instructional changes in first grade classrooms and reading progress of first grade students in relation to implementation of standards-based report cards (SBRC). The goal of this study, conducted in a suburban Texas school district, was to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in reading progress between students enrolled in first grade classrooms in which traditional report cards were used in comparison to comparable classrooms in which SBRCs were used. Additionally, the instructional practices of teachers were examined to determine the types of changes that took place as the district moved from traditional report cards to SBRCs. A total of 709 students and 15 teachers were involved in the study. The study revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between the reading growth of students assessed in SBRC classrooms and those assessed with traditional report cards. There were, however, significant differences in instructional practices employed by teachers in SBRC classrooms. These changes in practice included instructing with a greater degree of focus on specific objectives to be taught, more closely following the district’s scope and sequence, greater communication regarding the grading criteria and methods used for reporting progress, use of the most recent achievement data when determining grades (in comparison to averaging of grades during a reporting period), and a greater awareness of students’ specific abilities.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Newell, Suzanne Payne
Partner: UNT Libraries

Declining Participation in Fraternity and Sorority Life: a Comparison of Perceptions of Greek-lettered Organizations Between Affiliated and Non-affiliated Students

Description: This quantitative study was used to determine the perceptions that may have caused a decline in membership in fraternities and sororities and to examine active organization involvement between affiliated and unaffiliated students at a single higher education institution in northeast Texas. Eight perceptions were given regarding fraternity and sorority life and why students chose to remain unaffiliated with fraternities or sororities. The instrument used was a modified version of the Extracurricular Involvement Inventory, created by Winston and Massaro (1987) and was administered to participants online via Survey Monkey. There were 206 participants total: 55.3% were female, and 44.7% were male. Regarding ethnicities, 47.0% were African American, 37.5% were Caucasian, and 15.5% were Hispanic/Latino. Out of the participants, 20.9% were in their freshman or sophomore year, 23.8% were juniors, 33.5% were seniors, and 21.8% were graduate students. Participants’ ages ranged from 18 to 32, with a mean of 22.89 (SD = 2.81). The research questions were analyzed using two techniques: logistic regression for the first question and multiple regression for the second question. Findings for the first research question indicated that lack of values, lack of diversity, poor academic attitudes, and a requirement of too much time were primary reasons unaffiliated students chose not to join a fraternity or sorority. Findings for the second question indicated that Greek-affiliated students averaged higher involvement intensity scores when compared to unaffiliated students. Practical implications and future research are discussed.
Date: May 2014
Creator: Shirley, Zachary E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Changes in Personality Traits Following an Intensive In-Service Para-Professional Counseling-Aide Program

Description: The primary purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of an intensive, in-service training program for modifying selected personality traits among para-professional counselor aides restricted to working with emotionally disturbed youth in a residential treatment center. Additionally, an attempt was made to identify the areas in which personality traits were modified, both between experimental and control groups and between males and females.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Pullen, Patrick Wilson
Partner: UNT Libraries

Examining the Relationship Between Individual and Work Environment Characteristics and Learning Transfer Factors

Description: To impact student learning, educators’ implementation, or transfer, of new knowledge, skills, dispositions, and practices to daily work is the primary purpose of professional learning. The purpose of this study was to assess the multivariate relationship between individual and work environment characteristics as measured by the Collective Efficacy Scale and Dimensions of Learning Organization Questionnaire, respectively, and learning transfer factors as measured by the Learning Transfer System Inventory. The sample consisted of 249 PK-12 grade school- based instructional staff members of an education association. Canonical correlation and commonality analyses required using the two individual and work environment characteristics of learning culture and collective efficacy as predictor variables of the five learning transfer factors of performance self-efficacy, transfer-effort performance expectations, performance outcome expectations, performance coaching, and resistance to change to evaluate the multivariate between the two variable sets. Learning culture and collective efficacy demonstrated a relationship to resistance to change and performance outcome expectations. Learning culture and collective efficacy were insufficient to transfer-effort performance expectations, attend to performance self-efficacy beliefs, and increase support for transfer (i.e., performance coaching) factors. These findings might guide the decisions and practice of individuals with responsibility to plan, implement, and evaluate professional learning, and provide the conditions necessary for changing educational practice while increasing support for and building educators’ confidence about implementation. Further research may confirm the findings and enhance generalizability.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Kennedy, Jacqueline E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of Selected Student and Environmental Variables in Open-Area and Traditionally-Constructed Elementary Schools

Description: The problem of this study was to assess and compare selected student and environmental variables in seven open-area elementary schools carefully matched with seven traditionally-constructed elementary schools on eight different criteria. The hypotheses were formulated to carry out the following four purposes of the study: 1. To determine the differences between the achievement test scores in reading, language, and mathematics of students attending open-area elementary schools and scores of similar students attending traditionally-constructed elementary schools, as measured by the California Achievement Test and the Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills administered in grades one, two, and three. 2. To determine if there was greater individualization of instruction in open-area elementary schools as measured by the Individualization of Instruction Inventory. 3. To determine if students attending open-area elementary schools evidenced a greater number of positive actions toward school, as indicated by attendance, number of acts of vandalism, and number of suspensions from school shown in official records of the school district.
Date: May 1974
Creator: Pitts, Joe M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Comparative Effectiveness of Conventional and Programed Instructional Procedures in Teaching Fundamentals of Music

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the comparative effectiveness of three out-of-class procedures designed to augment a conventional classroom instructional method in a course in the fundamentals of music for elementary education students. The procedures examined were (a) conventional out-of-class study assignments; (b) out-of-class individual use of a programed textbook; and (c) out-of- class individual use of a teaching machine program. This study was concerned with measures of achievement in fundamentals of music as taught to elementary education students at North Texas State University, Denton, Texas, during the 1963-1964 school year. The measures of achievement in music were limited to the pre-test of fundamentals of music and to the post test, interim test, and retention test of fundamentals of music.
Date: January 1965
Creator: Cribb, George Robert, 1927-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Behavioral Outcomes of Client-Centered Play Therapy

Description: This study was concerned with determining the effectiveness of play therapy as measured by behavioral changes in interpersonal relationships, mature behavior patterns, and more adequate use of intellectual capacities. Client-centered play therapy appears to have grown out of the concept that it is the relationship between the therapist and the child that brings about change and growth. Rather than diagnostic or as preliminary to therapy, the relationship itself is seen as therapy. Problems are seen not in terms of their historical past, but rather as they exist in the immediate present and in terms of the child's own means of expression. The relationship offers to the child the opportunity to experience growth under the most favorable conditions. Like its adult counterpart, client-centered counseling, client-centered play therapy is based upon the hypotheses that the individual has within himself the capacity for growth and self-direction, and that these growth impulses are released within the therapeutic relationship established between the therapist and the child. This study was conducted to investigate changes in behavior which occur as a result of play therapy and to determine that such changes do not occur in the absence of play therapy. It was a direct outgrowth of an ongoing program developed at the Pupil Appraisal Center of North Texas.
Date: May 1969
Creator: Herd, Ruby H. (Ruby Helm)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Use of Visual-performance Feedback and Its Effect on Behavior-specific Positive Praise in a Self-contained Behavior Classroom

Description: The present study aimed to understand the relationship between the use of visual-performance feedback and its effects on behavior-specific positive praise in classrooms for students who exhibit behavioral challenges. The current study included 15 children being served by four teachers in elementary self-contained behavior classrooms. Data collection and instrumentation included (a) a pre-service training for all four teachers, (b) two weeks of baseline data on behavior-specific positive praise, (c) eight weeks of data collection in which visual-performance feedback was reported to all four teachers, (d) one consultation session, and (e) two weeks of additional data collection. Observational data attempted to determine the functional relationship between visual-performance feedback, behavior-specific positive praise, and student outcomes using a mixed methods research model. Analysis revealed identified patterns in the relationship between visual-performance feedback, the amount of behavior-specific positive praise, and student behavioral and academic outcomes. These patterns are displayed through both quantitative results taken from the observational data as well as qualitative information given by teachers. Conclusions surrounding the positive outcomes for students were derived from the strongest correlations of between behavior-specific positive praise and visual-representation feedback. Implications drawn from the study were: (a) behavior-specific positive praise training should be a standard for teachers in behavior classrooms, and (b) group consultation should be an important part of monitoring behavior-specific positive praise for classroom teachers.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Gibbins, Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of Professional Development on Student Achievement As Measured by Math and Science Curriculum-based Assessments

Description: The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of teacher professional development on student achievement measured by scores on curriculum-based assessments, CBAs. The participants in the study included 260 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade math and science teachers. Teacher participation in professional development courses was collected for curriculum, instruction, differentiation, assessment, technology integration, and continuous improvement credit types. Achievement data for 8,454 students was used: 2,883 in 3rd grade, 2,752 in 4th grade, and 2,819 in 5th grade. The dependent variable of student achievement was dichotomized at the median: half of the student participants scored above the median and half of the students scored at and below the median. A series of logistic regression models were fit to the data that included examining all main effects and interaction terms among all variables to determine the best fitting model. The results of this study indicate that for 4th grade science, teacher professional development participation in curriculum, instruction, and differentiation credit strands increased the chances for students to score above the district median on CBAs. The larger number of professional development hours in a variety of credit strands had a negative impact on student achievement in 4th grade science. In 5th grade science, the students whose teacher spent more hours in professional learning for continuous improvement had an increased likelihood of scoring above the district median on CBAs.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Parish, Deidre A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparative Study of Three Methods of Teaching Tumbling

Description: This investigation compares the results of three different methods of teaching tumbling, the Trampoline Method, Mental Practice, and the Traditional Method. The study also investigates whether sex and ability level significantly affect the results of the teaching methods. The subjects were the ninety members of the junior-level gymnastics classes for physical education majors at New Mexico State University during the fall and spring semesters of the 1972-1973 school year. There were forty-five female and fortyfive male subjects. A stratified random sample was constructed to insure equality of the teaching-method groups. The motor educability scores of the Johnson-Metheny Test were used to develop high-, medium-, and low-ability groups. The subjects in the ability groups were randomly selected and assigned to one of the teaching methods.
Date: December 1973
Creator: Hazlett, Robert Maurice
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Experimental Study to Compare Audio-Tutorial Instruction with Traditional Instruction in Beginning Typewriting

Description: The problem of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two methods of teaching beginning typewriting in the community college. The two methods are an audio-tutorial approach and the traditional textbook approach. Groups taught by the contrasting methods of instruction were compared on the basis of their production performance and their straight-copy skills after thirty-six class periods of instruction. A comparison was also made of the attrition rate of the two groups.
Date: August 1974
Creator: Jones, Arvella
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Three Approaches to Preservice Human Relations Training for Teachers

Description: This study was an investigation of the different effects of three procedures of human relations training in changing the personality characteristics and attitudes of preservice teachers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a difference between a structured group laboratory experience, a non-structured group counseling experience, and a regular classroom lecture experience on the development of interpersonal attitudes of preservice teachers, and to ascertain the extent to which attitudinal and personality changes take place.
Date: August 1974
Creator: McWilliams, J. Hudson
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Doctoral Program in Higher Education at North Texas State University: An Appraisal

Description: Doctoral graduates of the program in Higher Education, Division of Higher Education, North Texas State University, from the fall of 1969 through spring, 1973, were selected as subjects for an evaluation of the program. To appraise the effectiveness of the program, the evaluation attempted to: (1) determine how the graduates viewed various aspects of their doctoral program and experiences at North Texas State University; (2) appraise the effectiveness of the doctoral program in Higher Education in light of the career goals and needs of the graduates and how the program served those needs; (3) present conclusions and recommendations based on the findings of the study which could aid in the administration of the program, provide information for planning new programs and policies, or in supporting those already in existence. A questionnaire was developed and used as the data-gathering instrument, after being revised according to suggestions given by a jury. The questionnaire was mailed to graduates on August 17, 1973, and a follow-up letter was mailed on September 19, 1973, to those non-respondents who could be identified. Of the total number of graduates who received the questionnaire, 69 (71 per cent) responded. Data contained in the questionnaires were numerically coded and recorded on keypunch worksheets. With the aid of the staff from the N.T.S.U. Computing Center, print-outs were produced from the worksheets which contained tabulated data. Tables were made from the data for analysis and interpretation. Analysis of the data led to the following conclusions. The program is producing graduates who have a marketable education with most of them teaching in four-year colleges and universities. The emphases on college teaching and administration are major strengths of the program and graduates rate a strong degree of satisfaction with the major program components, structure and curriculum. Competencies gained in educational research and statistics ...
Date: August 1974
Creator: Brice, Bert Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of Three Breaststroke Turns and Their Effects on Swimming Fifty Yards

Description: The problem with which this study was concerned was that of comparing three methods of executing the competitive breaststroke turn and their effects on swimming fifty yards. The turns utilized were the AAU, NCAA, and somersault. A related purpose was that of analyzing the time a breaststroke competitor was to be submerged on the glide following the turn. One hundred four male, senior swimmers from teams in the Arkansas AAU were rated on five components of the breaststroke. Twenty-nine advanced and thirty novice breaststrokers were selected from this group to participate in this study. The subjects were timed for a distance of fifty yards using, in order, the AAU, NCAA, and somersault turns.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Courtway, Robert Franklin, 1927-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of the Life, Professional Career, and Contributions to Interscholastic Athletics in Texas of Prince Elmer Shotwell

Description: This biography of Prince Elmer Shotwell particularly emphasizes his contributions to Texas interscholastic athletics, to the University Interscholastic League, and to the Texas High School Coaches' Association. Data for this life study are from both primary and secondary sources, human and documentary as well. Shotwell's personal files and scrapbooks are used extensively, and supplementary data come from biographical data forms and tape-recorded personal interviews. The study includes biographical data of Shotwell's youth, educational background, marriage, and his endeavors in the teaching and coaching fields.The study discloses that Shotwell made contributions in various modes throughout his more than fifty years in the profession. Most of his professional endeavors were superimposed by his consistent personality traits of enthusiasm, industry, intensity, and persistence.
Date: December 1973
Creator: Simpson, Sidney Herman
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Criterion-Referenced Tests on the Acquisition of Mathematical Skills and the Mastery of Objectives in Fifth-Grade Students

Description: This study is a description and analysis of the effect of criterion referenced test data on the acquisition of math skills and the mastery of selected objectives in fifth-grade students.The first chapter includes the introduction, statement of the problem, purposes of the study, statement of the hypotheses, background and significance., definition of terms, limitations, basic assumptions, and procedures for collecting data. The second chapter is a review of the literature pertaining to criterion-referenced testing and also includes a review of studies utilizing criterion-referenced test material. The third chapter describes the population being studied, the instruments used to measure achievement, and procedures for treatment of the data. The fourth chapter presents an analysis of the data collected for the study and a discussion of the findings. The fifth and final chapter presents a summary of the study, findings, conclusions, and recommendations pertaining to future research in the utilization of criterion- referenced testing. The subjects in this study were sixty, fifth-grade students attending Lakeland Elementary in the Lewisville Public School System who comprised the experimental group and sixty, fifth-grade students attending Central Elementary in the same district, who comprised the control group. The Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills (Form G Level 2), and the Prescriptive Mathematics Inventory (Aqua Level), were administered to both groups, with the pretest occurring in September, 1973 and the posttest being administered in April, 1974. Analysis of covariance and chi square goodness of fit were the techniques used to analyze the data statistically. Significant change was found to take place in the experimental group in mastering a greater proportion of the objectives selected for this study. The socio-economic level and educational background of the parents of the subjects in this study proved to be a significant factor in mastering the objectives selected for this study. The hypotheses utilizing ...
Date: August 1974
Creator: Downing, Clayton W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Teachers' Attitudes Toward the "New" Social Studies

Description: The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of three different types of in-service or preservice training on the attitudes of sixth-grade teachers in selected Texas school districts toward the "new" social studies. The types of preparation compared are the following: completion of a social studies methods course within the last two years, attendance at a social studies in-service training session at least three hours in length within the past year, a major or minor in one of the social science disciplines, or combinations of these. Additional variables such as age, teaching experience, classroom organization, degrees held, and textbooks being used are also considered. Three hundred twenty-four respondents from thirteen school districts completed a two-part questionnaire. Part A seeks biographical, educational, and experiential information. Part B contains thirty-nine statements about social studies education to which the participants respond on a six-point Likert-type scale. Data are treated with a one-way analysis of variance, and hypotheses are retained or rejected at the .05 level of significance. When a significant F-ratio is found on data having more than two groups, the Fisher's t for multi-type comparisons is applied to determine where the significant differences occur.
Date: August 1973
Creator: McIntosh, Carolyn Jo Johnson, 1938-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Authoritarianism and Selected Trait Patterns of School Administrators: Seventeen Case Studies

Description: This study was concerned with analyzing selected Texas school administrators in an attempt to locate intrapersonal patterns of (1) values, (2) leadership traits, (3) personality traits, (4) critical thinking ability, (5) perception, and authoritarianism. A second aspect was correlating these profiles with each other. The study had a threefold purpose. The first was to perform a detailed analysis of school administrators to determine selected intrapersonal patterns. The second was to determine possible relationships between these selected profiles. The third was to generate plausible hypotheses for testing the intrapersonal patterns found and for determining the magnitude of any existing relationships. The case studies revealed the uniqueness of each participant in this study. With the possible exception of one individual, certain weaknesses were evident in each of the participants. Canonical correlation and the Pearson correlation of D matrices determined that a relationship existed between many of the profiles. Eight hypotheses were presented at the close of the study as guides for additional research. The results of this study indicated that further research was justified in these particular areas. The results of this study indicated that intrapersonal patterns existed within school administrators and that these patterns or profiles are related. However, the determination of the magnitude of these relationships was left to additional research.
Date: May 1971
Creator: Davis, Walter Newton
Partner: UNT Libraries