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Female Athletic Directors' Perceptions of Position Power

Description: This study sought to determine female college and university athletic directors' perceptions of position power according to selected job-related characteristics, through development and use of a nineteen-item survey instrument. The study was conducted during the 1991-1992 academic year and consisted of an initial study to determine content validity of the survey instrument, followed by construct validity and reliability determination utilizing a pilot study group of twenty female intercollegiate athletic directors.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Lewis, Leigh Garnet
Partner: UNT Libraries

African-American Senior Administrators of Colleges and Universities in American Higher Education: Identification of Characteristics in Their Career Progression

Description: This study identified and compared characteristics in the career progression of African-American college presidents of institutions in the continental United States. The study was concerned with personal, educational and professional characteristics of these senior level administrators. From a population of 141 individuals, 73 presidents participated in this study. Frequencies, means, percentages, chi-square, crosstabulations and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed in the analysis of data. The level of significance was set at 0.05.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Marbury, R. Kevin (Robert Kevin)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attitudes of Faculty Members in Rajamangala Institute of Technology, Thailand, Toward the Implementation of Computers

Description: This study explored the attitudes and perceptions of faculty members in Rajamangala Institute of Technology (RIT), Thailand. The purpose of this study was to (a) determine which demographic variables are associated with faculty members attitudes toward the implementation of computers in higher education in Thailand, and (b) determine perceptions among faculty members toward barriers to the widespread use of computers.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Cheamnakarin, Pornpimon
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Historical Review of the Development of Federal Universities of Technology in Nigeria

Description: The overall purpose of this study was to identify the major factors and events that led to the establishment of the Federal Universities of Technology in Nigeria. The study examined and analyzed the growth and development of the three Nigerian Federal Universities of Technology at Owerri, Akure, and Minna.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Asagba, Joseph Obukowho
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Administrative Leadership Styles of the Senior Administrators of Public Universities in Texas

Description: The study of leadership in education, business, industry, government, and other organizations has evolved over time. Early studies focused on leadership traits and behavior. Currently, researchers and theorists have concentrated on the interaction of leadership styles and situations. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the predominant leadership style of a group of senior administrators of public universities in Texas.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Nwafor, Samuel Okechukwu
Partner: UNT Libraries

Factors Involved in the Selection of Medical Technology as a Major Field

Description: The problem of this study concerned the factors involved in the selection of medical technology as a major. The purposes of the study were to determine (a) the most influential factors in the selection of medical technology as a career, (b) which sources of career information were the most frequently utilized and most influential in the choice of medical technology as a major, (c) the most common misperceptions of the field at the time of selection of the major, and (d) the relationship between accurate perceptions of the field at the time of major selection and satisfaction with the choice of major after employment.
Date: December 1992
Creator: Jones, Gail A. (Gail Ann)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Perceived Importance of the Characteristics and Functions of the Advanced Nurse Practitioner

Description: The purpose of this study was two-fold: to identify role functions and characteristics perceived as important to Advanced Nurse Practitioners (ANPs) in Texas, and to identify differences in perceived importance of role functions and characteristics of ANPs according to gender, educational preparation, practice setting, and whether the practitioner entered practice before or after the current rules and regulations for ANP practice were adopted. Two questionnaires and a demographic data form were mailed to 300 ANPs in primary health care in Texas, with 152 responding. Data from the questionnaire, "Characteristics of the Advanced Nurse Practitioner," were analyzed using independent group t-tests. The findings indicated that the characteristics "person-oriented," "perceptive," and "skilled in problem-solving" were the most valued by the practitioners, while aggressive" was the least valued. Independent group t-tests were used to analyze data from the instrument, "Advanced Nurse Practitioner Functions." The results of this analysis were not significant. The Chi square test was used to further examine data from this questionnaire to determine if the responses differed from chance. With the exception of four items, all of the responses differed significantly from chance. The responses "extremely important or important" were selected significantly more frequently that any of the other options. Not appropriate," was selected significantly more often than could be expected by chance for two functions: suturing minor lacerations and performing incision and drainage of wounds. Fourteen functions were examined further using frequency, percentage of responses, and the Chi square test to determine if there were differences in responses between groups. There were significant differences in responses between ANPs in nurse-managed settings and those in physician-managed settings on four functions: ordering diagnostic tests, prescribing medications in consultation with a physician, suturing minor lacerations, and performing incision and drainage of wounds. Practice setting and educational preparation were the variables which had ...
Date: December 1987
Creator: Barnes, Ellen Sue M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

John F. Walvoord at Dallas Theological Seminary

Description: This study gives a historical analysis of the life and career of John F. Walvoord. He has served Dallas Theological Seminary for over fifty years in various capacities. The process of gathering information included a review of literature, a review of the institutional records of the Seminary, and a systematic search of the Archives, providing a chronological history of personal correspondence from the Office of the President from 1924 through 1954. An interviewing process concluded the study and served as the means of evaluation and review.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Mink, Timothy G. (Timothy Gale)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Job Satisfaction Among Faculty Members of Nursing Colleges in Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate job satisfaction among full-time faculty members of nursing colleges in Thailand, by using the Faculty Job Satisfaction /Dissatisfaction Scale developed by Olin R. Wood. The investigation was based on the ten factors of job satisfaction selected from the Herzberg Motivation-Hygiene theory as follows: achievement, growth, interpersonal relations, policy and administration, recognition, responsibility, salary, supervision, work itself, and working conditions. The questionnaire consisted of 68 items, using a six-point rating scale for ten factors of job satisfaction. The population consisted of 621 full-time nursing faculty members in twenty-one nursing colleges across the country of Thailand. A total of 408 nursing faculty members or 65.70 percent of the population participated in this study. Frequencies, percentage, one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA, regression analysis, and coefficience of concordance W. were used in the follow-up investigation, with the level of significance at .05.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Pitr Thongchant
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of a Peer-Taught Freshman Seminar Course on Grades and Retention

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a peer-taught freshman seminar course on the grade point averages and retention rates of freshman students. Freshman students who entered the University of Texas at Arlington in the fall 1989 and fall 1990 semesters and enrolled in the voluntary 1 credit hour course "College Adjustment" were matched with freshman students who did not enroll in the course. Matched pairs were formed based on orientation attendance, college major, gender, and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores. For both years, the Freshman Seminar Group was similar to the group of All Other Freshman Students regarding the following characteristics: college major, age, gender, ethnicity, SAT scores, and number of first semester hours completed. Analysis of variance was used to determine if statistically significant (p < .05) differences existed between the first semester and first year grade point averages for the Freshman Seminar Group and Freshman Seminar Matches. Chi-square analysis was employed to determine if statistically significant (p < .05) differences existed between the second semester and sophomore year retention rates for the Freshman Seminar Group and Freshman Seminar Matches. The freshman seminar course was more beneficial to African American students, as evidenced by statistically significant first year grade point averages and sophomore year retention rates. Males who enrolled in the freshman seminar course appeared to benefit more than males who did not enroll in the course, as shown by statistically significant sophomore year retention rates. Students with low SAT scores appeared to benefit from the freshman seminar course, as evidenced by statistically significant second semester and sophomore year retention rates.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Schulze, Louann Thompson
Partner: UNT Libraries

Development of Cooperative Education at the University of North Texas, 1976-1988

Description: The main purpose of the study is to describe the developmental story of one of the larger university cooperative education programs in the United States to provide the evidence of outcomes and to utilize selected elements of the program in other colleges and universities. The study utilizes historical methodology with a descriptive approach to investigate and analyze the program's establishment, its development of staffing, organization, students, employers, funding, and its evaluation by using primary and secondary sources, annual reports, federal grant request proposals, evaluation reports, and the on-campus newspaper. The information for this study was also gathered through personal interviews with previous and present staff members of the program. The study shows that the program was established in the dean of students' office, but in order to get more support from the faculty, the program was moved to the academic affairs office. As a result of the academic support by the faculty, the program expanded. The findings show that the federal grant, Title VIII, contributed significantly to the initiation and growth of the program. The investigator observes that the director's leadership and the staff members' commitment to the program were two of the most important factors in the continued growth of the program. Strong commitment by the chief executive officer of the institution has also been a strong factor in the continuous growth of the program. The study indicates that close affiliation with professional organizations has benefited the program by influencing the development of quality and effective, diverse employers. The results show that the cooperative program significantly aided the students, institutions, and employers annually by placing approximately 1,200 students in their major-related working places.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Kim, Sang Kil
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Use of Part-Time Faculty in Associate Degree Nursing, Social Science, and Biological Science Programs

Description: This study surveyed the opinions of academic administrators of associate degree nursing programs, community college social science programs, and community college biological science programs regarding major benefits and concerns associated with the employment of part-time faculty. This study found that most part-time social science faculty teach in the classroom, half participate in non-teaching faculty activities, and most are paid a contract amount per course or credit hour. Part-time biological science faculty differed only in that most teach a combination of classroom and lab/practicum. Part-time nursing faculty differed in all three areas. Most part-time nursing faculty teach in lab or practicum settings, most participate in more non-teaching activities than other part-time faculty, and most are paid an hourly wage. However, the benefits and concerns associated with the employment of part-time nursing faculty were not significantly different from those identified by academic administrators of the other programs with one exception. Academic administrators felt that part-time nursing faculty expose students to the latest technologies in specialty areas and part-time social science faculty do not. The benefits cited by the respondents, that were in addition to the benefits most frequently cited in the literature, include increased interaction with the community and the ability to "try out" prospective full-time faculty. The concerns cited by respondents, that were in addition to the concerns most frequently cited in the literature, include the inability to find qualified part-time faculty to fill available positions and the concern that the employment of part-time faculty causes resentment among full-time faculty. The results from this study indicate that the literature pertaining to the benefits and concerns associated with the employment of social science and biological science part-time faculty in community colleges can be used to develop policies regarding part-time faculty in associate degree nursing programs.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Shepard, Pamela Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

Early Identification of Dropout-Prone Students and Early Intervention Strategies to Improve Student Retention at a Private University

Description: The problem of this study was first year student retention at a private university. The purpose of the study was to identify high risk students (dropout prone) by use of the Stratil Counseling Inventory -_ College Form (SCI-C) in order to initiate early intervention counseling and advising. Intrusive counseling was started within the first six weeks of the 1984 fall semester to facilitate the students' transition to college. The population of the study was first-time full-time freshmen students in attendance at Freshmen Orientation the week prior to the beginning of the 1984 academic year. SCI-C instrument consisted of six scales designed to elicit attrition-related information about the firsttime, freshmen students. The scales identified students who were in need of assistance, and they provided a profile of their problem areas. This information, available within ten days after the beginning of classes enabled Student Development personnel to select the students out of the freshman class who needed help and to refer them to university resources for assistance. The conclusions drawn from the analysis of the SCI-C data were: (1) students who needed assistance to integrate into the academic and social envrionment of the university were identified by the SCI-C; (2) students at Hardin-Simmons University value adult/student relationship outside of the classroom; (3) attitudes of caring service creates a "staying environment;1* (4) although the SCI-C indicates students' interests in support services, not all students who request assistance, avail themselves of the opportunities provided for them; (5) a relationship seems to exist between the intervention strategies provided particular freshmen and their succesful performance in the classroom (CPA of 1.60 or greater) and their persistence at the university for their second year; (6) the SCI-C provides attrition-related counseling information about students rather than predicting college academic success; and (7) the SCI-C i s a valid ...
Date: December 1985
Creator: Bray, Carolyn Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Systematic Analysis and Critical Comparison of the Educational Provision for Students in Nigeria with the Available Educational Opportunity for Handicapped Students

Description: The problem of the study was the inadequate education of handicapped students in Nigeria. The primary purpose of the study was to develop a construct based on the United States models and research on special education, and to compare educational provisions for Nigerian students with the available educational opportunity for handicapped students. In order to achieve the stated objectives of the study, two methodological approaches were utilized: (1) Likert scale for opinion questionnaires, and (2) personal interviews. Both of these instruments included demographic information about the participants. The questionnaire was categorized into three areas (differences between educational opportunities for non-handicapped and handicapped students, formal learning opportunities for handicapped Nigerian students, and factors for being attentive or not being attentive to special education). The interview instrument focused on special education constraints, responsibility for special education provision, and improvement in education for the handicapped. Based on the findings of the study, the following conclusions were reached. 1. Handicapped Nigerian students do not have equal educational opportunities, as compared to non-handicapped students. Therefore, equal instructional opportunities should be provided for handicapped and non-handicapped students. 2. The federal and state governments of Nigeria should be financially responsible for special education. Therefore, the administration of special education must be taken over from private organizations. 3. Lack of funds, personnel and specialists, equipment, and adequate facilities hinders education for the handicapped in Nigeria. In order to improve education for the handicapped, therefore, the following provisions should be made: (1) build more schools, (2) train more specialists, (3) make funds available for special education, (4) provide more facilities and equipment, (5) intensify efforts in early detection of handicaps in children, and (6) educate parents on the importance of special education.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Ogunrinu, Thomas B. (Thomas Bode)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of the Outcomes of Stress Management Training in Ministerial Programs of Higher Education

Description: This dissertation studies the outcomes that higher education courses and seminars in stress management have on the stress levels of pastors. It identifies stress level differences between a sample of pastors who have and who have not been trained in stress management. The instrument that was used to assess the levels of stress was the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The Inventory is a twenty-two item dual-rating instrument that measures the frequency and intensity of three aspects of the burnout syndrome: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a lack of personal accomplishment. Demographic questions were used to determine the respondents' sex, age, education, and experience in the clergy. These questions were asked for descriptive purposes only. In addition, questions were asked that would determine whether or not the pastors had had stress management training.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Shirley, Philip E. (Philip Elwood)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Job Satisfaction Among Faculty Members at Yarmouk University

Description: This study measured and analyzed job satisfaction among faculty members at Yarmouk University in relation to gender, marital status, age, annual salary, years of experience, academic rank, academic activity, faculty affiliation, country in which the last degree was received, tenure status, and nationality. The population consisted of 350 full-time faculty members. A total of 216 (61.7%) faculty members participated in this study. The data collecting instruments consisted of the faculty data sheet and the Job Descriptive Index. Frequencies, percentages, means, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed to analyze the data. The level of significance was set at 0.05. A Scheffe method of multiple comparison was used for follow-up investigation. Although the results of the study indicate that there were no significant differences in job satisfaction among faculty members with regard to gender, marital status, academic activity, and the country in which the faculty member received the last degree, significant differences were found with regard to age, annual salary, nationality, years of experience, rank, tenure status, and faculty affiliation.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Tanash, Salameh Y. (Salameh Yousef)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Job Satisfaction Among Faculty Members at Non-Metropolitan Teachers Colleges in Central Thailand

Description: The Faculty Job Satisfaction/Dissatisfaction Scale developed by Olin R. Wood (1973) was employed in this study to determine what significant differences and level of faculty job satisfaction existed on each facet of job satisfaction and in overall job satisfaction among faculty members at non-metropolitan teachers colleges in central Thailand. The results of this study were compared with the findings of Vatthaisong (1982) in a similar study of faculty members at teachers colleges in northeast Thailand. The instrument consists of two parts: the first part includes seven demographic items, and the second part has 68 items and uses a six-point rating scale for ten facets of job satisfaction, including one-single item of overall satisfaction. A sample of 288 faculty members at non-metropolitan teachers colleges in central Thailand was randomly selected. A total of 253 faculty members or 87.85 percent of the sample participated in this study. Frequencies, percentages, means, one-way ANOVA, and two-way ANOVA were used for analyses. The level of significance was set at .05. The Scheffe method for post hoc comparison was adopted following one-way ANOVA.
Date: May 1986
Creator: Karoonlanjakorn, Suthep
Partner: UNT Libraries

Perceptions of the Sudanese Professional Working in Saudi Arabia on Migration and Economic Development of the Sudan

Description: The brain drain emerged as a phenomenon in the Sudan in the early 1970's when a change in the political system was followed by a change in the economic situation. The oil price increases created a dynamic process that led to attractive employment conditions in the petroleum producing countries such as Saudi Arabia and to depressed economic conditions in the developing countries like the Sudan. The purposes of the study are to (a) obtain information on the Sudanese professionals working in Saudi Arabia, (b) determine what major factors influence their migration, and (c) to develop policy recommendations on the flow of migration from the Sudan. The population of this study were Sudanese professionals living in Saudi Arabia. Data were generated through surveying a sample of 300 subjects selected randomly from the defined population. A survey questionnaire based on the research questions was developed for this study. Data from 263 respondents were analyzed. The findings of the study suggest that the majority of the Sudanese professionals working in Saudi Arabia are male, between 30 to 40 years of age. They have many years of experience and a high level of qualifications. The factors that led to their migration are: (a) high cost of living in the Sudan, (b) low salary, (c) money shortage, (d) high cost of housing, (e) little opportunity for advancement, and (f) shortage of basic necessities. It is realized that migration has costs and benefits for the Sudan. Government policies should be directed to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs. It is recommended that the government should adopt policies to regulate migration and assure the Sudanese expatriates of the efficient execution of these policies, attract their remittances through exemption and facilities, and work toward eliminating or reducing the causes of migration.
Date: March 1990
Creator: Hamid, Adil A. (Adil Abdelaziz)
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Historical Inquiry Into the Development of Higher Education in Ghana 1948-1984: a Study of the Major Factors That Have Controlled and Inhibited the Development of the Universities of Ghana

Description: Universities in many industrialized countries including Japan, and Australia, have enabled those countries to achieve rapid economic and social advancement. However, this is untrue for the universities of Ghana, due to the country's ailing economy, its continued dependence on foreign manpower, aid, and material goods. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to illuminate the major factors and events that have controlled and inhibited the development of higher education in Ghana from 1948 to 1984. The method of acquiring data involved a computer and manual search for documents from 1) ERIC Database, 2) libraries , and 3) Embassy of Ghana, Washington, D.C. The findings include (1) Establishment of universities on the basis of the Asquith Doctrine; (2) Imitation of British universities' curriculum, constitution, standards and social functions; (3) Characterization of universities by elitism, lack of diversity and adaptation, autonomy, excellence and narrow specialism in their honor degree programs; (4) Emphasis on cognitive rather than psychomotor learning; (5) Matriculation of inadequately qualified secondary school science students; (6) Absence of a nationally formulated statement of manpower needs, goals, and effective long-term planning; (7) Financial exigencies; (8) Suppression, perversion and abuse of academic and intellectual freedom by the government and universities; (9) Inconsistent governmental policies due to abrupt changes in government by military coups.
Date: December 1985
Creator: Darko, Samuel F. (Samuel Fordjour)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Role of Persons Other Than Professional Development Staff in the Solicitation of Major Gifts From Private Individuals for Senior Colleges and Universities

Description: The purposes of this study were to determine and describe the roles of persons other than professional development staff in the solicitation of major gifts from private individuals for selected senior colleges and universities as perceived by senior development officers. The activities of four groups of nondevelopment staff, trustees, president/chancellor, private citizens, and nondevelopment staff/faculty, were examined through the four steps of the major gift solicitation process: identification and rating, cultivation, the in person solicitation, and the thank-you process following the gift. The population encompassed all accredited, degree granting four year colleges and universities in the United States which solicit major gifts from private individuals. The sample consisted of the 223 schools which had received one or more gifts of one million dollars or more from private individuals as reported in Giving USA. Philanthronin Digest, or The Chronicle of Higher Education, between January 1, 1985, and December 31, 1987. The research instrument was a mailed questionnaire which was sent to the Chief Development Officer of the 223 schools in the sample. Replies were received from 162 institutions, for a response rate of 72.7%. Examination of the results of this study indicated that the services of nondevelopment personnel were used in the major gift solicitation process at the vast majority of schools in the United States, that over half of the major gift dollars solicited were attributable to the efforts of these individuals, and that the president/chancel lor was the most important advocate for an institution's development program followed by the trustees, private citizens, and finally the nondevelopment staff/faculty. Further examination of the data revealed specific determinants which a senior development officer should, for different nondevelopment groups, weigh more or less heavily when deciding which individual(s) will have the greatest likelihood of being influential with major donor prospects.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Winfree, Walter R. (Walter Russell), 1947-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Curriculum Analysis of Content Related to Rural Nursing in Baccalaureate and Associate Degree Nursing Programs in Texas

Description: The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which rural nursing content is included in the curricula of baccalaureate and associate degree nursing programs in Texas. Additional purposes include determining the association between the emphasis on rural nursing content perceived by curricular chairpersons as ideal and current content emphasis, examining the difference in rural nursing emphasis between the two program levels, determining variables predictive of rural nursing emphasis and determining efforts to recruit students from rural areas. Data were collected by means of a mailed questionnaire developed by the investigator. Statistical analyses of these data were then conducted. Major findings include the determination of current and perceived ideal emphasis of rural nursing content, the difference in rural nursing emphasis between baccalaureate and associate degree nursing schools in Texas, the association between perceived ideal and actual content emphasis, those variables which are predictive of rural nursing emphasis in undergraduate curricula in Texas and the recruitment efforts from rural areas made by each level of program.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Singer, Shannon Gail
Partner: UNT Libraries

Socioeconomic Backgrounds of Educators and Their Attitudes Toward Women as Academic Administrators

Description: The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship, if any, between the socioeconomic backgrounds of educators and their attitudes toward women as academic administrators, including a comparison of the attitudes of male and female educators toward women as administrators. The population consisted of all full time faculty and administrators in 25 colleges and universities holding membership in the Association for Higher Education (AHE) of North Texas during the 1984/1S85 academic year. This group of institutions consists of 10 community/junior colleges and 15 senior colleges and universities. Data generation was achieved through the administration of a research package mailed to a sample of 300 subjects selected by a proportionate random process from the defined population. The instruments consisted of a modified version of the Women As Managers Scale (WAMS) and the Hollingshead Factor Index of Social Status. Useable data from 209 respondents were subjected to multiple regression techniques. The hypothesis that socioeconomic background of educators will be positively related to attitudes toward women as academic administrators was not upheld. It was however determined that attitudes toward women as administrators are explanable by a combination of job and non-job related variables, with women having more positive attitudes than men. The findings that 1) younger subjects have more positive attitudes, 2) experience under a female superordinate, generated favorable comments, and 3) educators as a whole had a highly favorable attitude lead to the conclusion that opportunities for advancement of women into adminstrative positions are brighter than often reported. It is suspected that the legislative activities and the feminist movement of the 1960s may have had a positive influence.
Date: May 1986
Creator: Okoro, Gregory I. (Gregory Ifeanyi)
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Historical Review of Higher Education in Nigeria from 1960-1985 with Emphasis on Curriculum Development

Description: The purpose of this study was to review higher education in Nigeria from 1960-1985 with emphasis on curriculum development, to identify the changes that took place during that period, and to utilize those changes to evaluate the current state of Nigerian higher education. In order to fulfill the purpose of this study, answers were sought for six research questions. Chapter 1 includes a statement of the problem, purpose of this study, research questions, background, and significance of the study. Chapter 2 presents information on the methods of gathering and analyzing data. Chapter 3 is a review of the background literature. Chapter 4 presents information on higher education and curriculum development 1960-1985, and Chapter 5 covers the Nigeria National Curriculum Conference of 1969. The findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the study are presented in Chapter 6.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Odueze, Simon Amanze
Partner: UNT Libraries

The West Indies College and its Educational Activities in Jamaica, 1961-1987

Description: The West Indies College is an institution of higher education in Jamaica which was established by the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in 1909. It has had three names: 1909-1923, West Indian Training School; 1924-1958, West Indian Training College, and 1959-present, West Indies College. The school has been served by over 20 presidents. The needs of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church, the Mandeville community, Jamaica, and the West Indies region continue to play an important role in the addition and elimination of academic programs at the college. Present programs have attracted students from Africa, North and South America, the West Indies, and Europe. The college has industries that are used as facilities to provide the work-study program for students to fulfill the college's operational philosophy of educating the entire person. The industries assist students in the development of manual skills and in the payment of tuition. The West Indies College is funded by grants of the Seventh-Day Adventist Church, tuition fees, profits from industries, and individual contributions. The school also receives a financial advantage in the form of tax exemption from the Jamaican government. An organized Department of Alumni Affairs assists the college in moral, professional, and material support. Due to the generosity of individual alumni, scholarships have been established to help needy students.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Mukweyi, Alison Isaack
Partner: UNT Libraries