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An Examination of Two Significant Percussion Compositions: Karlheinz Stockhausen's Zyklus and Ingolf Dahl's Duettino Concertante, a Lecture Recital Together with Five Recitals of Selected Works of A. Ginastera, A. Wilder, W. Kraft, and Others

Description: Zvklus (1959) by Karlheinz Stockhausen and Duettino Concertante (1966) by Ingolf Dahl represent two of the most significant percussion compositions that present the percussionist as soloist. The performer of these works, either unaccompanied or accompanied by a non-percussion instrument, is featured as executant, interpreter, and improvisor. They are regarded as classics in the medium of multiple percussion because of their frequency of performance and their profound effect on notation, musical composition, and the technical expectations of the percussionist. This paper examines these compositions and their historical significance to both percussion literature and the percussionist. Each of these compositions is analzyed by examining instrumentation, compositional procedures, and performance problems. Finally, the notational procedures and role of the performer in these compositions are compared. A discussion of the development of the percussion batterie, percussion ensemble, and the important early solo multiple percussion compositions provides historical perspective for these compositions. This perspective is enhanced by consideration of biography, influences, and stylistic development of each composer.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Carney, Michael R. (Michael Reed), 1952-
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Harmonic Interval of the Seventh in the Works of Representative Composers of Italian Madrigals, 1542-1614

Description: This study is an attempt to shed some light on the treatment of one dissonance—the seventh—in the works of the following composers: Cipriano de Rore (1516-1565); Philippe de Monte (1521-1603); Giaches de Wert (1535-1596); Luca Marenzio (1553-1599); Carlo Gesualdo (ca. 1560-1613); and Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643). The purpose of this thesis is to discover (1) the frequency of occurrence of primary (relatively accented) sevenths and their inversions (^ chords, etc.) in a selection of each composer's madrigals; and (2) the methods of handling sevenths employed by each composer, with particular emphasis on the relationship between these methods and sixteenth century theory.
Date: December 1976
Creator: Dowden, Ralph D.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The New Classicism: Alfredo Casella's Sinfonia, Arioso and Toccata, Op. 59, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Chopin, Mozart, Bartók, Bach, Schumann, Arensky, Bruch and Others

Description: The neo-classic movement in Italy, which gained momentum in the early 1920's, was rooted in an instrumental style patterned after that of the Baroque era. The term "new classicism," proposed by Ferruccio Busoni in 1920, represented a reaction against the extreme chromaticism and large performance forces of the late nineteenth century. The pianistcomposer Alfredo Casella, after earlier periods in which he was influenced by such diverse composers as Mahler, Debussy, and Schoenberg, soon became the chief spokesman for the neoclassic movement in Italy. Casella considered the Sinfonia, Arioso and Toccata his most important work for the piano, because of its size and musical content. It is notable for its usage of thematic transformation, much of which is based on the interval of a fourth or fifth. This study includes a formal outline of each movement, showing sectional divisions and tonal regions, as well as illustrations of thematic transformation and intervallic patterns. Also discussed are the work's neoclassic style characteristics, including counterpoint, pandiatonicism, modality, and linear cadential treatment.
Date: May 1981
Creator: Copeland, Nancy M.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Robert Schumann: Novelletten, Opus 21, a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of L.v. Beethoven, R. Schumann, J. Brahms, and E. Granados

Description: The Novelletten of Robert Schumann stand out as unusual among his works for solo piano. It is the largest cycle of character pieces in his output and has other distinguishing features. One unusual aspect of the work is its abundance of literary references which Schumann revealed at various points when it was being composed. This is an aspect unique to this cycle since Schumann's other cycles refer to a single literary source. One of the purposes of this paper is to discuss these numerous literary references which have never been examined in any detail before. Present in the Novelletten is a use of musical motives from works of his wife Clara. There are also musical references to other composers such as Beethoven and Haydn. This quoting of himself and others is not an uncommon practice for Schumann but here, in context with remarks made by Schumann himself about the work, the nature of his use of these musical references becomes more transparent. One of the main points being made through this discussion of literary and musical references in the Novelletten is that partly through these elements the work is unified into an eight movement cycle.
Date: May 1981
Creator: Blaine, William
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Orfeo I: an Analytic Investigation of Thea Musgrave's Work for Flute and Tape, with Performance Guide

Description: This comprehensive study of Thea Musgrave's Orfeo I is the basis for a lecture-recital performed on March 20, 1989, at the University of North Texas, as part of DMA dissertation requirements. It includes: brief bio-background of Musgrave and Orfeo; historical background of both the Orpheus legend and some landmark dramatic works based on it; general development of Musgrave's dramatic language and specific ways in which she uses it in this composition; analysis of the work; performance guide; and annotated appendix listing Musgrave's published and recorded chamber works which include flute. Orfeo I is a major work for flute and electronic tape comprised entirely of manipulated flute sounds. It was commissioned by the British Broadcasting Corporation for James Galway, who recorded the taped material and was the featured performer in the 1976 London premier. An alternate version, Orfeo II, with fifteen strings in place of electronic tape, was premiered by David Shostac in 1976 in Los Angeles, and conducted by the composer. Orfeo's form is programmatically designed, divided into six sections based on Musgrave's "Scenario"of the Orpheus myth. Characters are dramatically depicted through means of "motifs"; that of Orpheus in solo flute, and all others in tape sounds. Musgrave uses quotations from Gluck's opera, Orfeo ed Euridice and Stravinsky's ballet, Orpheus, as basic compositional models. Using her own harmonic language, she combines tonal and chromatic elements in a linear compositional style which ties flute and tape together. Through "controlled aleatory," the soloist is allowed to shape certain aspects of the work. Use of electronic tape places Orfeo I in the realm of intermedia. In addition, Musgrave offers a versatile range of performance possibilities, from highly dramatic (including lighting instructions, option of ballet choreography for solo male dancer, costuming, etc.) to a straight concert rendition.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Shotola, Marilyn W.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Archetypal Dreams

Description: In the composition Archetypal Dreams, musical imagery is created through motifs and ideas that represent the symbolic messages of the unconscious. These motifs are introduced, developed, transformed, and overlapped in contrapuntal dialogue. This unfolding of material grows in significance and complexity building to a resolution of tension. The relationship of motifs to the row is re-established and the row is reconstructed. In this manner the conscious and unconscious elements of the personality are symbolically reconciled. The four movements of the work are entitled: I. Primordial Images; II. Archaic Remnants; III. Mythological Motifs; IV. The Process of Individuation
Date: August 1987
Creator: Hanson, Dan L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Songs of Lennox Berkeley: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of F.P. Schubert, G. Fauré, C. Debussy, F. Poulenc, M. Ravel, H. Wolf, J.S. Bach, G.F. Handel, I. Stravinsky, and Others

Description: The English art song in the 20th-century presents a performance challenge unique in the solo song repertoire. Unlike the corresponding bodies of German Lied and French mélodie, which proceeded from a well-ingrained national tradition of music and poetry, the English art song had no such background. The many British composers who have contributed to the song literature of this century reflect varied backgrounds and influences. Lennox Berkeley combined his English heritage with the French background of his mother's family, largely self-taught musical skills and an innate sensitivity to poetry to become one of the most prominent song composers of this century. He trained with Nadia Boulanger, gaining exposure to the formal and melodic techniques of Faure and the neo-classicism of Stravinsky. Berkeley composed a total of seventy-eight solo songs. His acceptance and furtherance of a fundamentally traditional songmaker's craft place him more directly in the post-war line of succession of English song than Benjamin Britten, whose innovative musical techniques place him in the vanguard of new music.This document explores those aspects of Berkeley's life and work that contribute to his compositional choices. It provides an overview of all of Berkeley's known solo songs as well as a more detailed analysis of Five Songs (Walter de la Mare), Five Poems CW.H. Auden) and Another Spring. The paper illustrates the qualities of Berkeley's songs which justify his inclusion among the most successful art song composers of this century
Date: August 1987
Creator: Hansen, Robert H. (Robert Howard)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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An Investigation of the Needs for Music-Related Content in the Bible College Pastoral Curriculum as Perceived by a Selected Group of Pastors

Description: The purpose of the study was to investigate the needs for music-related content in the Bible college pastoral curriculum as perceived by a selected group of pastors. The research problems were (1) to assess the extent of musical preparation of recent pastoral graduates from selected accredited Bible colleges in the United States, (2) to assess the music-related duties of those graduates in paid pastoral positions, (3) to assess the pastors' perceived needs for instructional preparation for the fulfillment of their musical duties, and (4) to determine the effect of selected factors on the perceived needs of those pastors.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Hui, Andrew
Partner: UNT Libraries
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A Study of the Relationship Between Motive and Structure in Brahms's op. 51 String Quartets

Description: In 1873, Brahms completed the two op. 51 quartets. These were not the first string quartets Brahms composed, hut they were the first that Brahms allowed to be published. He found the string quartet difficult; as he confided to his friend Alwin Cranz, he sketched out twenty string quartets before producing a pair he thought worthy of publishing. Questions arise: what aspect of the string quartet gave Brahms so much trouble, and what in the op. 51 quartets gave him the inclination to publish them for the first time in his career? The op. 51 quartets are essential to understanding the evolution of Brahms's compositional technique. Brahms had difficulty limiting his massive harmony and polyphony to four solo strings. This difficulty was compounded by his insistence on deriving even the accompaniment from the opening main motivic material. This study investigates the manner in which Brahms distributes the main motivic material to all four voices in these quartets, while at the same time highlighting each voice effectively in the dialogue.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Yang, Benjamin H. (Benjamin Hoh)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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An Examination of Two Sextets of Carlos Chávez, Toccata for Percussion Instruments and Tambuco for Six Percussion Players

Description: This lecture-recital deals with the two percussion sextets of Carlos Chavez. Each of the compositions is analyzed by examining compositional characteristics and performance problems. The selection, substitution, and construction of the necessary instruments for performance are explored. Suggestions for stage set-up are also included. The percussion ensemble has become an integral part of most high school and university percussion programs. Much of the literature composed for this medium has not become part of the standard literature. Chlvez's Toccata has obtained its place in the literature—it is one of the most often performed percussion works in the world. Although Tambuco has not yet attained the same status as Toccata, it is, nevertheless, an important contribution to the literature. An attempt is also made to identify the significance of these works by examining some of the early influences on Chavez's compositional style both from his native Mexico, and from other composers writing for percussion ensembles.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Peterman, Timothy J. (Timothy James)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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History of the Violin Scordatura: A Lecture Recital Together with Three Recitals of Music by Albinoni, Copland, Beethoven, Haydn, Arensky, Vitali, Prokofiev, and Grieg

Description: The lecture recital was given June 29, 1976. The subject was the History of the Violin Scordatura, and it included an historical survey of scordatura compositions along with discussions of the problems of notation and hints for solving the practical problems of performance. Works by Biber, Vivaldi, and Nardini were performed at appropriate moments during the lecture. In addition to the lecture recital, three other public recitals were performed: The first solo recital was on April 15, 1974 and included works of Albinoni, Copland, and Beethoven. The second program, a chamber music recital on January 19, 1975, featured works for piano trio by Haydn, Copland, and Arensky. The third recital was presented on April 14, 19 75 and included works by Vitali, Prokofiev, and Grieg. Magnetic tape recordings of all four programs and the written lecture material are filed together as the dissertation.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Tarvin, Ronald
Partner: UNT Libraries
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English Devotional Song of the Seventeenth Century in Printed Collections from 1638 to 1693: A Study of Music and Culture

Description: Seventeenth-century England witnessed profound historical, theological, and musical changes. A king was overthrown and executed; religion was practiced fervently and disputed hotly; and English musicians fell under the influence of the Italian stile nuovo. Many devotional songs were printed, among them those which reveal influences of this style. These English-texted sacred songs for one to three solo voices with continuo--not based upon a previously- composed hymn or psalm tune—are emphasized in this dissertation. Chapter One treats definitions, past neglect of the genre by scholars, and the problem of ambiguous terminology. Chapter Two is an examination of how religion and politics affected musical life, the hiatus from liturgical music from 1644 to 1660 causing composers to contribute to the flourishing of devotional music for home worship and recreation. Different modes of seventeenth-century devotional life are discussed in Chapter Three. Chapter Four provides documentation for use of devotional music, diaries and memoirs of the period revealing the use of several publications considered in this study. Baroque musical aesthetics applied to devotional song and its raising of the affections towards God are discussed in Chapter Five. Chapter Six traces the influence of Italian monody and sacred concerto on English devotional song. The earliest compositions by an Englishman working in the stile nuovo are Henry Lawes' 1638 hymn tunes with continuo. Collections of two- and three-voice compositions by Child, the Lawes brothers, Wilson, and Porter, published from 1639 to 1657, comprise Chapter Seven, as well as early devotional works of Locke. Chapter Eight treats Restoration devotional song-- compositions for one to three voices and continuo, mostly of a more secular and dramatic style than works discussed in earlier. The outstanding English Baroque composers--Locke, Humfrey, Blow, and Purcell--are represented, and the apex of this style is found in the latest seventeenth-century publication of devotional song, …
Date: May 1986
Creator: Treacy, Susan
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Centonization and Concordance in the American Southern Uplands Folksong Melody: A Study of the Musical Generative and Transmittive Processes of an Oral Tradition

Description: This study presents a theory of melodic creation, transmission, memory, and recall within the Anglo- and Celtic-American culture of lower Appalachia, from the time of the earliest European settlers until the present. This theory and its attendant hypotheses draw upon earlier published ideas, current theories of memory and recall, and the results of applying a computer-supported analytical system developed by the author. Sources include previous studies of folksong melody, song collections, and earlier investigations of the psychology of memory. Also important are portions of an anonymous treatise on traditional Celtic musical scales and an authoritative, modern interpretation of this document. A final body of sources is a small group of sound-recordings.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Bevil, J. Marshall (Jack Marshall)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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On the Nature of Melody in Asia and Medieval Europe

Description: In current musicological research, considerable attention is given to the description of melodic structure and pitch organization. But it is problematical that the analytical concepts and terminology of the Common Practice Era are largely inadequate for meaningful description of melody of Asia and medieval Europe. For most traditions of melody in Asia and medieval Europe, there is some sort of developed system of theory, but each system is limited to the repertory it describes. Consequently, the comparative study of melody in these fields has been seriously hampered, and much published research in melody has had to concern itself with the formulation of analytical approaches more than the actual study of melody. This study attempts to resolve this problem by offering for consideration an analytical model, the acoustic melodic formula, that is of use in the comparative study of melodic structures and formulas in Asia and medieval Europe. The acoustic melodic formula is a structural design consisting of three conjunct intervals, namely, a lower perfect fourth, a middle third of varying intonation, and an upper third, also of varying intonation. In addition to identifying the acoustic melodic formula in Japan, Korea, central Asia, and Jewish, Byzantine and Latin chant, this study also investigates how such melodies have additional tones--melodic embellishments--added to them through folk improvisation and artistic elaboration.
Date: December 1983
Creator: Siddons, James
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Transposition and the Transposed Modes in Late-Baroque France

Description: The purpose of the study is the investigation of the topics of transposition and the transposed major and minor modes as discussed principally by selected French authors of the final twenty years of the seventeenth century and the first three decades of the eighteenth. The sources are relatively varied and include manuals for singers and instrumentalists, dictionaries, independent essays, and tracts which were published in scholarly journals; special emphasis is placed on the observation and attempted explanation of both irregular signatures and the signatures of the minor modes. The paper concerns the following areas: definitions and related concepts, methods for singers and Instrumentalists, and signatures for the tones which were identified by the authors. The topics are interdependent, for the signatures both effected transposition and indicated written-out transpositions. The late Baroque was characterized by much diversity with regard to definitions of the natural and transposed modes. At the close of the seventeenth century, two concurrent and yet diverse notions were in evidence: the most widespread associated "natural" with inclusion within the gamme; that is, the criterion for naturalness was total diatonic pitch content, as specified by the signature. When the scale was reduced from two columns to a single one, its total pitch content was diminished, and consequently the number of the natural modes found within the gamme was reduced. An apparently less popular view narrowed the focus of "natural tone" to a single diatonic pitch, the final of the tone or mode. A number of factors contributed to the disappearance of the long-held distinction between natural and transposed tones: the linking of the notion of "transposed" with the temperament, the establishment of two types of signatures for the minor tones (for tones with sharps and flats, respectively), the transition from a two-column scale to a single-column one, and the …
Date: December 1988
Creator: Parker, Mark M. (Mark Mason)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Piano Sonatas of Rodolfo Halffter: Transformation or New Techniques?

Description: The Piano Sonatas of Rodolfo Halffter (b. 1900, Madrid, Spain) represent an important body of literature not widely known nor understood for their historical importance and Spanish heritage. The entire development of Halffter's compositional style, which embraces three periods of composition, may be traced through these sonatas. The modes of composition may be seen not to be separate and distinct but as having inter—relationships which therefore affect the outcome of Halffter's final dodecaphonic technique. The culmination of his serial method is found in the Tercera Sonata, op. 30. At first glance, this work appears to be a radical departure from the former styles. However, a more in-depth study reveals this sonata to be the logical outgrowth of earlier compositional techniques, thereby blending diverse, eclectic elements into a unique and homogenous application, all Halffter's own. Forced to flee his native country in 1939, Halffter became the first composer in Mexico to use twelve-tone techniques. Together with Carlos Chavez, he exerted great influence on the present generation's group of Mexican composers. Halffter today remains a crucial link in the continuation of the Spanish tradition as exemplified by his former mentor, Manuel de Falla. A brief explanation of Falla s theory of resonance including sketches in Falla's handwriting as well as portions of the unpublished analysis of Halffter's Tercera Sonata are presented, perhaps for the first time. This study reveals how Halffter manipulates many Spanish elements which are found in the ancient cante iondo and the string tunings of the guitar in addition to the use of acciacaturas and the internal rhythm of Domenico Scarlatti into a personalized idiom which remains apparent throughout all his compositional styles. An analysis of Halffter s Tercera Sonata shows that the final period is characterized by a unique blending of Falla's "apparent poly-tonality" with the twelve-tone system …
Date: August 1985
Creator: Harper, Nancy Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Effects of an Auditor's Past Musical Experience on the Intelligibility of Vowel Sounds in Singing

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an auditor's past musical training and experience on the intelligibility of selected vowel sounds at differential pitch levels. The specific problems of the study were to investigate the effects of extensive vocal music training, extensive non-vocal music training, and limited or no music training on an auditor's ability to discriminate accurately selected vowel sounds performed at various pitch levels. The effects of pitch and vowel sound on auditor recognition of vowel sounds in singing and the ability of each singer to be intelligible to auditors was also investigated.
Date: December 1983
Creator: Bradley, C. Mark (Charles Mark)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Capriccio, By Richard Strauss and Clemens Krauss: Theoretical Discussion as Theatrical Presentation, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of Strauss, Wagner, Verdi, Mozart, Britten, and Prokofiev

Description: In Capriccio. Richard Strauss and Clemens Krauss examine the very nature of opera with the core of their thesis being the relationship of words and music. A work that is, in essence, an extended discussion poses two problems to the composer and librettist: how to sustain the argument of the thesis without losing the attention of the audience, and how to prevent a conversational opera from sounding like endless recitative. Strauss and Krauss manage to present their case without having to resort to an actual discussion for the duration of the opera. Their characters are engaging, identifiable human beings who are also allegorical figures. Their participation in the stage action sustains the argument of the thesis even when the dialogue itself addresses other subjects. The players symbolize various facets of opera, theatre, and the public with all of them, principal and secondary characters, being sharply etched. The little stage action that Capriccio does contain is carefully paced and closely coordinated with the presentation of the work's thesis. The octets, similar in dramatic function to the central finale of a Mozart opera buffa, provide the climax of the stage action and come soon after the Fugal Debate, the centerpiece of the collaborators' argument. The final section of the central scene, which also contains the aforementioned octets and Fugal Debate, serves as the denouement of both the plot and thesis. Such close attention to dramatic structure gives Capriccio and the argument it presents cohesion and dramatic shape. The text itself is written in clear, concise prose and is set in Strauss's patented "conversational style." This style, a rapid syllabic declamation, is delivered "mezza voce" in order to simulate natural speech and is sung over continuous melos in the orchestra. This accompaniment keeps it from sounding like dry recitative. This study explores the …
Date: August 1986
Creator: Saunders, David Harold
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Fifth and Sixth Clarinet Concertos by Johann Melchior Molter: A Lecture Recital Together with Three Additional Recitals

Description: The dissertation consists of four recitals: one chamber music recital compiled from two years' series of chamber music performances in residence, two solo recitals, and one lecture recital. The repertoire of these programs was chosen with the intention of demonstrating the capability of the performer to deal with problems arising in works of varying types and of different historical periods. The lecture recital, The Fifth and Sixth Clarinet Concertos by Johann Melchior Molter, begins with perhaps the first performance of the Concerto No. 4 in D Major, Mus. Hs. 337, for clarinet in D with orchestral accompaniment reduced for piano. Bibliographical, historical and technical information is marshaled to justify the solo designation of Badische Landesbibliothek concerto manuscripts 334 and 328 to D clarinet rather than clarino. An investigation into the formal and stylistic aspects shows these two questionable works to be comparable to the composer's other four clarinet concertos. The analysis is followed by a short discussion of the problems involved in the transcription and performance of the works. The lecture concludes with the first performance of the Concerto No. 6 in D Major, Mus. Hs. 328, for clarinet in D with orchestral accompaniment reduced for piano.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Shanley, Richard A.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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A Suite for Double Bass Transcribed From Pièces à une et à deux Violes, by Marin Marais: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, Karl Ditters von Dittersdorf, W.A. Mozart, and Others

Description: The music of Marin Marais, a major figure among the French Baroque bass viol composer-performers, is seldom played today. His compositions which are artistically and historically significant, should be available to instrumentalists of this century. Marais published five volumes of bass viol compositions. Seven movements were transcribed from the Second Suite of Marais' first volume. The first chapter is an introduction to Marais; the second chapter pertains to the bass viol and its styles of performance, and the final chapter illustrates the editing required for the transcription. The problems encountered were those of adapting the melodic, harmonic, and contrapuntal styles of the seven-stringed bass viol to the double bass which is normally monophonous. Melodic elements were unchanged, chords were simplified, and contrapuntal lines were retained by giving the second voice to the continuo bass.
Date: December 1982
Creator: Swaim, Daniel
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Missae De Beata Virgine C. 1500-1520: A Study of Transformation From Monophonic to Polyphonic Modality

Description: While musical sources and documents from throughout the Middle Ages reveal that mode was an enduring and consciously derived trait of monophonic chant, modality in later polyphony shares neither the historical span nor the theoretical clarity of its monophonic counterpart. Modern theorists are left with little more than circumstantial evidence of the early development of modality in polyphony. This study attempts to shed light on the problem by detailed analysis of a select body of paraphrase masses from the early sixteenth century. First, it correlates the correspondence between the paraphrased voice and the original chant, establishing points of observation that become the basis of melodic analysis. Then, these points are correlated with known rules of counterpoint. Exceptions are identified and examined for their potential to place emphasis on individual mode-defining pitches. A set of tools is derived for quantifying the relative strength of cadential actions. Levels of cadence are defined, ranging from full, structural cadences to surfacelevel accentuations of individual pitches by sixth-to-octave dyadic motions. These cadence levels are traced through the Missae de beata virqine repertoire from c. 1500-1520, a repertoire that includes masses of Josquin, Brumel, La Rue, Isaac, and Rener. While the Credos, based on two chant sources—one early (11th century) and one later (15th century)—showed little modal consistency, the Kyries show some suggestion of purposeful modal expression; and the Glorias show even greater implications. Results of the study have potential application in sixteenth-century music scholarship to such important issues as musica ficta, performance practice, text underlay, and form.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Woodruff, Lawrence Theodore
Partner: UNT Libraries
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The Influence of Jazz on French Solo Trombone Repertory

Description: This lecture-recital investigated the lineage of French composers who were influenced by jazz during the first half of the twentieth century, with a focus on compositions from the solo trombone repertory. Historically, French composers, more than those of other European countries, showed an early affinity for the artistic merits of America's jazz. This predilection for the elements of jazz could be seen in the selected orchestral works of Les Six and the solo compositions of the Paris Conservatory composers. An examination of the skills of major jazz trombonists early in the twentieth century showed that idioms resulting from their unique abilities were gradually assimilated into orchestral and solo repertory. Orchestral works by Satie, Milhaud, and Ravel works showing jazz traits were investigated. Further, an expose of the solo trombone works emanating from the Paris Conservatory was presented. Although written documentation is limited, comparisons between early recorded jazz trombone solos and compositions for orchestral and solo trombone was established. These comparisons were made on the basis of idiomatic jazz elements such as high-tessitura ballad melodies, blue tonalities and harmonies, syncopated rhythms, and many of the aspects of style associated with improvisation. All major French solo trombone repertory to mid-century was surveyed and examined.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Samball, Michael L. (Michael Loran)
Partner: UNT Libraries
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A Background and Analysis of Selected Lieder and Opera Transcriptions of Franz Liszt. A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Works by Chopin, Schubert, Bartok, Franck, and Other Composers

Description: An understanding of the piano transcription is basic to any proper comprehension of nineteenth-century piano music and performance practice. In this study, the transcription for solo piano is examined in relation to several musical milestones in the mid-nineteenth century, including far-reaching technical developments in the piano, the beginning and growth of the public concert, the birth of the solo piano recital, and the influence of virtuosity as a Romantic ideal. In addition, as Liszt was undoubtedly the greatest transcriber of the nineteenth century, several representative transcriptions of Liszt are analyzed and compared to their original models, including Schubert's Gretchen am Spinnrade and Auf dem Wasser zu singen, Chopin's Moja pieszczotka ("My Joys"), Wagner's Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde, and the quartet from the final act of Verdi's Rigoletto.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Gibbs, Dan Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries
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