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A Comparison of the Achievement of Two Groups of Algebra I Students and Teacher Scores on the Texas Teacher Appraisal System

Description: The problem of this study was to determine if the teachers of Algebra I rated highest and lowest according to the Texas Teacher Appraisal System differed significantly in a measure of achievement. The analyses indicated that there were significant differences in achievement between the classes taught by the highest and lowest ranked teachers.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Shine, Thomas E. (Thomas Earl)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Content Analysis of the Writing Assignments Contained in the Four Basal Mathematics Textbook Series Adopted by the State of Texas

Description: The purpose of this study was to identify and compare specific writing assignments provided in the four basal mathematics textbook series, grades six through eight, accepted by the state of Texas in 1990. The student and teachers' editions by each publisher were analyzed (1) for the total number and types of writing assignments provided, (2) to compare how the writing assignments compared with the four purposes of writing mandated in the English Language Arts Framework, Kindergarten through Grade 12 for the state of Texas, (3) to compare how the writing assignments compared with the recommendations for communication opportunities stated in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics for grades five through eight, and (4) to compare the number and types of writing assignments among the four publishers. The total number of writing assignments varied among publishers ranging from 151 to 316 in the student editions and from 147 to 523 in the teacher's editions. The findings of this study indicate that from 80 to 98 percent of the writing assignments in the student editions and from 72 to 96 percent of the writing assignments in the teacher's editions corresponded to the Informative purpose of writing. Very few writing assignments were provided corresponding to the Literary, Expressive, and Persuasive purposes of writing. The writing assignments corresponding to the NCTM recommendations varied among publishers. Writing assignments dealing with modeling mathematical situations ranged from 14 to 66 percent in the student editions and from 24 to 39 percent in the teacher's editions. Writing assignments focusing on understanding and definitions ranged 15 to 61 percent in the student editions and from 31 to 53 percent in the teacher's editions. Writing assignments focusing on interpretation and application ranged from 5 to 29 percent in the student editions and ...
Date: May 1993
Creator: Irvin, Barbara Bando
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Inclusion of Texas Literature in Texas Public School Curricula

Description: The Inclusion of Texas Literature in Texas Public School Curricula advocates the organized inclusion of Texas literature in Texas public schools. The first chapter, the introduction, establishes the study's contention that Texas literature, an internationally admired body of literature, is worthy of an organized state inclusion. Another contention in the introduction is that this inclusion would offer its own needed content while reinforcing concepts and skills already mandated for social studies and English and language arts classes.
Date: December 1992
Creator: Hill, Billy Bob
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of the Use of the Calculator in Algebra I Classes on Basic Skills Maintenance and Algebra Achievement

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were any differences in basic skills maintenance between Algebra I students who used calculators during classroom mathematics instruction and Algebra I students who did not use calculators during classroom mathematics instruction. Another purpose of this study was to determine whether there were any differences in algebra achievement between Algebra I students who used calculators during classroom mathematics instruction and Algebra I students who did not use calculators during classroom mathematics instruction. This study also investigated the effects of the use of the calculator in Algebra I classes on students' attitudes toward mathematics.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Whisenant, Martha A. (Martha Ann)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Dimension of Risk and its Relationship to Effective School Leaders

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship existed between teachers' or principals' effectiveness and their risk tendency. The population consisted of 57 principals and 115 teachers from the state of Texas from average and exemplary campuses. The exemplary campuses were those nominated by Texas Education Agency to participate in the National Exemplary School Recognition Program for the past four years. Data was generated by sending a survey packet to the 57 campuses requesting that the principal and two teachers (one who had been recently been recognized as teacher of the year and one who had never been so honored) complete the instruments. Teachers responded to a 16 item Risk Tolerance Questionnaire and principals responded to the Risk Tolerance Questionnaire and a Styles of Leadership Survey. The hypothesis that exceptional teachers will not take more risks was not upheld. It was determined that exceptional teachers do take more risks; however, there was no significant difference in scores on the Risk Tolerance Questionnaire of principals from average and exemplary campuses. The findings were that 1) exceptional teachers do take more risks, 2) age and years of experience of teachers was not significant, 3) principals from average and exemplary campuses did not score significantly different on the risk instrument, 4) principals' years of experience was not significant, 5) sex of principals was significant in determining style of leadership, and 6) there was no relationship established between principals' risk tendencies and styles of leadership. It may be concluded that leadership style may be reflective of the work situation and its people, while the tendency to take risks is an independent attribute.
Date: December 1992
Creator: Krohn, Betty June Burns
Partner: UNT Libraries

Integration of Students with Disabilities into a Contemporary Technology Education Program: a Case Study

Description: The impacts resulting from the integration of students with moderate-to-severe disabilities into a contemporary technology education program are described in this study. The research centered around questions that addressed impacts on students with disabilities, on regular students, on teachers, and on parents of students with disabilities. The study took place in a ninth-grade technology education class and involved two students with moderate-to-severe disabilities. One subject was a 15-year-old male student who was autistic, had a speech handicap, and was mildly retarded. The other student was a 17-year-old male who was emotionally disturbed and learning disabled. Data were collected through classroom observations, videotaped sessions, and interviews with teachers and parents. Notes taken during observations and from videotaped sessions were transcribed, coded, and analyzed. Interviews were also transcribed. The transcripts were reviewed, and significant data were transferred to interview synopsis sheets for incorporation with the other findings. No major problems were found with the integration of the students with disabilities into the technology education program. The students with disabilities caused no discipline problems and were readily accepted by the regular students. However, because the students with disabilities were not actively involved in many of the activities of the class, much of their time was spent off task. The findings reveal that the technology education teacher, who was provided only minimal orientation prior to the placement of the students with disabilities in his class, used regular students as well as individual attention to direct the students with disabilities. A strong need for in-depth, ongoing communication was indicated between special education staff members and mainstream teachers. The importance of providing an orientation for regular students before students with disabilities are placed in mainstream classes was also evident from this study.
Date: December 1992
Creator: Pullias, David T. (David Terrell)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Differences in the Actual and Ideal Roles of Secondary School Counselors in Region X Schools as Perceived by Counselors, Principals, and Counselor Educators

Description: There has been extensive criticism of schools for allowing counselors to be used for duties that lie beyond defined counselor roles. The purpose of this study was to determine if counselors are still being misused today as they have allegedly been in the past. The problem was divided into nine questions in order to ascertain differences in actual and ideal roles of secondary school counselors as perceived by counselors, principals and counselor educators. The study was limited to secondary schools in the Region X Education Service Center in Texas. The study included brief definitions of roles and an extensive review of literature. Twenty-three schools from the Region X Education Service Center in Texas were chosen using a random, stratified selection process. A counselor and the principal from each of these schools were interviewed using a Q sort. Three counselor educators were randomly selected to participate from each of three universities in the area. The Q-sort technique was used in order to determine differences in actual and ideal perceptions of the counselor's role as held by counselors, principals, and counselor educators. Cohen's equation for Q sorts was used to establish correlations between the different perceptions. A t distribution for correlation was used to determine significance. There was a significant positive correlation for these groups concerning their perceptions of secondary school counselors' roles: 1. Counselors' actual and counselors' ideal. 2. Principals' actual and principals' ideal. 3. Counselor educators' actual and counselors* ideal. 4. Counselors' and principals' actual. 5. Principals' and counselor educators' actual. 6. Counselors' and counselor educators' actual. 7. Counselors' and principals' ideal. 8. Counselors' and counselor educators' ideal. 9. Principals' and counselor educators' ideal. The Q-sort questions were also analyzed to determine which roles were ranked by these three groups to be most and least important.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Dethlefsen, Anna K. (Anna Katheryn)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relationship of Teacher Temperament to Effectiveness in the Classroom

Description: The purposes of this study were (I) to determine the relationship of teacher temperament to effectiveness in the classroom and (2) to determine the relationship of the teacher's temperament to the teacher's sex, to the grade level taught, to the area taught (special education or regular education), and to the subject taught. It was hypothesized that (I) there is no significant relationship between the teacher's temperament and his effectiveness in the classroom, (2) there is no significant relationship between the teacher's temperament and sex, (3) there is no significant relationship between the teacher's temperament and the grade level he teaches (elementary or secondary), (4) there is no significant relationship in the teacher's temperament and the area he teaches (special education or regular education), and (5) there is no significant relationship between the teacher's temperament and the subject he teaches.
Date: December 1987
Creator: McMillan, Margaret S. (Margaret Shelfer)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relationship of Student Mathematics Scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test to Teacher Effectiveness as Measured by the Texas Teacher Appraisal System

Description: The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the scores on the quantitative portion of the SAT for 110 students and these students' math teachers' ratings on the TTAS, (2) to determine the nature of the relationship of the students' SAT scores to their teachers' TTAS ratings, and (3) to determine the nature of the relationship of the students' SAT scores to their sex. It was hypothesized that (1) there would be no significant relationship between a student's math score as measured by the quantitative portion of the SAT and the effectiveness of the student's math teacher as measured by the TTAS, and (2) there would be no significant relationship between a student's math score as measured by the quantitative portion of the SAT and the student's sex. The 110 subjects (60 males and 50 females) In this study took the quantitative portion of the SAT during the 1986-87 school year. This sample was drawn from a large suburban high school in the North Texas area. The effectiveness of the math teachers who taught the 110 students was measured by the Texas Teachers Appraisal System (TTAS). The statistical analyses indicated that (1) there was no significant relationship between a higher SAT score and a math teacher's higher TTAS rating and (2) there was no significant relationship between male and female SAT scores. Recommendations for future research include: (1) does the TTAS actually measure teacher effectiveness, (2) do appraisers in Texas follow state mandated training procedures, (3) does the quantitative portion of the SAT contain sexually biased items, (4) does the SAT actually predict student ability, (5) do teachers respond in like manner to male and female students, (6) does the high school curriculum tend to favor one sex more than the other.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Clingman, Elizabeth Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of Academic Achievement of Boys and Girls from Full-Day and Half-Day Kindergartens

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine whether any differences in academic achievement existed between full-day and half-day kindergarten students at the end of their kindergarten and first-grade school years. Two public schools considered comparable in size, philosophy, and socioeconomic levels of a large school district in Texas participated in the study. One of the schools provided a full-day kindergarten program; the other school provided a half-day kindergarten program. Kindergarten students from each of the two schools were match-paired according to birthday and sex. The total sample size was fifty students. All students were tested in December, 1985, with the Metropolitan Achievement Test. Preprimer Level, and in May, 1986, the end of the kindergarten year, with the Primer Level of the Metropolitan Achievement Test. The Metropolitan Achievement Test. Primary I Level, was additionally administered to the subjects in April, 1987, at the end of their first-grade school year. During each testing period, the subjects were administered the Reading, Language, and Math subtests of the Metropolitan Achievement Test. The following supplemental data also were gathered on the students: The Metropolitan Readiness Test II scores and the TEAMS test scores. The data obtained from the testing batteries were statistically analyzed using the .05 level of significance to test each hypothesis. In analyzing the data of all of the academic achievement testing batteries, statistical conclusions revealed that there was no significant difference in the mean scores of children (boys or girls) attending the fullday kindergarten program and children attending the half-day kindergarten program in academic achievement at the end of the kindergarten year or at the end of the first-grade year. It is recommended that continued studies be conducted to investigate the academic achievement of students attending full-day and half-day kindergarten programs. It is also recommended that other variables rather than academic ...
Date: December 1987
Creator: Tabb, Juanita K. (Juanita Kay)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Cognitive Level Demands of Test Items in State-Adopted Computer Science Textbooks

Description: Test items supplied with seven textbooks approved for use in Computer Science I and II curricula in Texas public schools were categorized by Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives. Eating was done by a panel of ten judges selected from a group of participants at a taxonomy workshop. The selection criterion was demonstration of at least 80 percent competency in item classification. Judges received a small stipend for completing the rating task. Of 2020 possible items, 998 were randomly selected for analysis. Equal percentages of items from each text were then randomly assigned to each rater. All statistical analyses were computed using SPSS/PC+ (version 2.1). In both courses, CLD frequencies decreased through the three lower levels. The percentage of questions falling in these levels was approximately 83 percent for both courses. However, the higher-level course contained almost 10 percent more Knowledge level questions than did the lower course. At the higher taxonomic levels, the decline was roughly five percent per level in CS I but erratic in CS II. Analysis by book also revealed wide differences within each course.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Aman, James R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparison and Contrast of Perceptions of Current and Ideal Levels of Involvement with Tasks Performed by School Library Media Supervisors

Description: Comparison and contrast of perceptions of current and ideal levels of Involvement with 50 tasks by 45 district level school library media supervisors in Texas public schools was accomplished using a survey instrument eliciting information in three areas: Curriculum and Instruction, Public Relations and Communication, Actainistration and Budget. Using tasks based on a Texas Education Agency publication, i, tests for correlated means were used to determine statistically significant differences between means for current and ideal levels of involvement for supervisors grouped by age, degree and certification as well as for the group as a whole. Findings showed that most demographic groupings perceived a need for greater involvement with various curriculum planning and design activities, evaluation of noncertlficated library media personnel and with various public relations activities.
Date: December 1989
Creator: McCulley, Lois P. (Lois Perry)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Application of Guided Mental Imagery as an Instructional Strategy

Description: The primary purpose of this study was to compare regular classroom instruction which used Guided Mental Imagery (GMI) to a non-GMI teaching method. This comparison was expected to yield data which would provide insights relating to the potential of GMI as a useful and effective instructional strategy. Quasi-experimental research methods were followed. The experimental design was a modified "post-test only control group design." Two-hundred-four students in naturally occurring in tact classes formed the experimental and control groups. All groups received instruction in identical science/health content. Two parallel post-tests were administered to all students. Post-test "A" was given immediately after instruction to measure learning acquisition. Post-test "B" was given four weeks later to measure retention of learning. Means for test scores were grouped according to treatment and sub-grouped by the variables: IQ, handedness, identified learning disability, and intellectual giftedness. T_ tests for differences between independent means were conducted. Students' acquisition of basic academic content, when instructed with GMI methodology, was found to differ significantly from students' acquisition of the same content with non-GMI instruction. No statistically significant differences based on instructional methodology were found for content retention. The investigator concluded that GMI instruction may increase learning. Although measures of retention did not show significant differences between groups, a review of the mean scores revealed a minimal difference. This was interpreted to indicate equality of retention between the two methods. Recommendations for further investigation were offered. Post-testing of subjects at additional intervals, and increased training of students and teachers in GMI prior to collection of data were suggested.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Burns, Frances D.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of the Effectiveness of an Abstract and a Concrete Approach in Teaching Selected Algebraic Concepts to Ninth and Tenth Grade Students

Description: One purpose of this study was to determine whether any differences in immediate achievement or retention existed between students using manipulatives and students not using manipulatives. Also addressed in this study is whether or not the use of manipulatives is more beneficial for girls than boys and whether the use of manipulatives is more beneficial for low-ability students than for high-ability students. Students selected for this study were from a large suburban school district in Texas. The students were from eight intact classes, four of which were designated as the experimental group and the other four as the control group. The sample consisted of one hundred eighty-seven students. All students were tested with a test developed by the researcher. This same test was administered as a pretest, posttest, and retention test. The following supplemental data were also gathered on the students: mathematics scores from the California Test of Basic Skills and scores from the mathematics section of the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills test. Analysis of the data revealed no statistical difference in the mean scores of students instructed with or without manipulatives when the test was administered immediately after instruction. Nor was there any statistical difference in the mean scores when the test was administered two months after instruction. There was no statistical difference in the mean gain scores from the pretest to the posttest between boys and girls or between high- and low-achieving students. Nor was there any statistical difference between the mean gain scores from the pretest to the retention test between boys and girls or between high- and low-achieving students. It is recommended that further studies be conducted to investigate achievement and retention of students using manipulatives at the secondary level. It is also recommended that variables other than achievement be studied to determine the ...
Date: May 1989
Creator: Wohlgehagen, James L. (James Lee)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Remediation of Language Arts Objectives Using an Experimental Curriculum

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if students who participated in language arts remediation which was infused with critical thinking activities and metacognition would make greater gains in skills and achievement than those students who were remediated with a regular language arts curriculum. The population for this study was a group of at risk students who were fourteen to sixteen years old and who were participants in the 1987 summer Youth Opportunities Unlimited project at the University of North Texas. Their progress was measured with California Achievement Test and Iowa Test of Basic Skills pretests and posttests. The organization of the study includes a statement of the problem, a review of the literature, the methods and procedures used to collect the data, the analysis of data, and a summary of the findings, conclusions, educational implications, and recommendations tor additional research. Data from the eight hypotheses were treated with an analysis of covariance. The analysis of data revealed the following: 1. The infusion of critical thinking activities and metacognition did not improve students' skills or achievement in the following areas: spelling, capitalization, and punctuation. 2. The infusion of critical thinking activities and metacognition did not improve students' skills in usage and expression as tested with items focusing on subject/verb agreement, verb tense, pronoun case, and pronoun degree. 3. The critical thinking activities and metacognition made a significant difference in students' achievement in language expression. The education implications are that lessons designed with mechanics objectives such as capitalization and punctuation should include independent practice. However, lessons designed with objectives focusing on usage, subject/verb agreement, double negatives, verb tense, and pronoun case and degree should include critical thinking activities and metacognition.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Long, Lucy Banks, 1938-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Factors Affecting the Implementation of Inservice Information in the Secondary Classroom: a Case Study

Description: The purpose of this study was to describe factors affecting the use of instructional ideas by secondary teachers in the academic year following a series of staff development sessions designed to present information on effective teaching practices. The research questions addressed the characteristics of information selected for use in classroom practice and the characteristics and relative degree of influence of salient factors affecting the use of ideas. Ten teachers from a large suburban school district in North Texas were selected for this study. Qualitative techniques were used to collect data. Each teacher was interviewed three times and observed in the classroom setting. Documents such as lesson plans were analyzed as a third source of data. Several factors evolved from the data. In varying degrees, these factors predicted teacher use of new instructional practices. Some factors dealt with the teacher's level of understanding and internalization of the information. These factors were labeled as instrumentality, congruence, and analytical thinking. Two other factors which were fairly strong predictors were labeled cost and intrinsic motivation. Cost concerned the amount of time or effort required to implement new ideas versus the perceived benefit to either teacher or student. Intrinsic motivation concerned the personal desire a teacher felt to try new ideas which might improve student learning. Another factor, professionalism, or teacher commitment to the teaching profession, was found to be a less powerful predictor. Two factors were found to be inconclusive predictors of implementation. They were the support felt by the teacher and external pressures, such as legislative mandates and district evaluations and career ladder. The cluster of factors developed in this study offer some possible guidelines for persons concerned with patterns of knowledge utilization among teachers. It is recommended that further studies be conducted to determine if the categories used in this study are ...
Date: May 1989
Creator: Sharpe, Frances Hollowell
Partner: UNT Libraries

Predicting Academic Achievement from Study Skills Habits among Upward Bound Students

Description: The problem of this study was to determine if study habits can be used to predict academic achievement. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between selected study skill habits and attitudes and achievement of secondary students in English, mathematics, and spelling. The sample for this study consisted of 82 secondary school students participating in Upward Bound programs at two universities in the north Texas area in a six week period during the summer of 1988. Eighteen different high schools were represented in the study. The sizes of the schools ranged from small to very large. Instruments used were the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes, (SSHA) the Stanford Test of Academic Skills, (TASK), and the Otis-Lennon Mental Abilities Test (OLMAT). The statistical analysis indicated that the four subscores of the SSHA are not accurate predictors of academic achievement. However, some of the correlations among the subscores for the SSHA and the TASK were significant. Most noteable of these were work methods and mathematics, teacher acceptance and mathematics, and work methods and spelling. The recommendation is made that the SSHA should not be used to predict academic achievement in Upward Bound programs. Improving study habits and attitudes should be addressed as a method of refining academic programs, not of predicting academic achievement.
Date: May 1989
Creator: McDougle, Kenny O. (Kenny Odell)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of Extracurricular Activities on the High School Academic Achievement of Average and Below Average Students During the Implementation of the Texas No Pass-No Play Rule (1983-1986)

Description: The State of Texas implemented the No Pass-No Play Rule within House Bill 72 in the spring semester of 1985. The addition of this section to the state education code was a part of the state's efforts toward educational reform. The perceived rationale implied in House Bill 72 is that extracurricular activities can inspire student motivation and increase student achievement. The No Pass-No Play Rule seems to imply that there is a relationship between student achievement and extracurricular activities, and further implies that a student can be motivated to achieve by the desire to continue to participate in extracurricular activities. The problem of this study was a comparison of academic achievement for high school pupils involved in extracurricular activities and those who did not participate in extracurricular activities under the Texas No Pass-No Play Rule. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of extracurricular activities on the academic achievement of high school students, specifically looking at the years 1983 through 1986, when the No Pass-No Play Rule was implemented. This study was an ex post facto study with data obtained from a cooperating Texas school district. Students were matched on critical variables, and their scores on a measure of achievement were analyzed to determine if there was any relationship between extracurricular activities and achievement. Repeated measures of achievement were also analyzed to determine if students involved in extracurricular activities scored differently from those not involved in extracurricular activities over this time period in which the No Pass-No Play Rule was implemented. Results indicated that for those students involved in this study, there was no significant difference on a measure of achievement for students involved in extracurricular activities and those who did not participate. Results also indicated that in the years 1983 through 1986 all students involved in ...
Date: August 1989
Creator: Pitton, Debra Eckerman
Partner: UNT Libraries

Educating Special Needs Students: Gifted and Honors Programs at the Senior High School Level

Description: This research sought to discover whether minority and economically disadvantaged students are underrepresented in gifted and honors programs. Another goal was to ascertain attitudes of students and teachers currently participating in gifted and honors programs regarding: admission criteria; adequacy of teacher preparation to meet special needs of gifted and honors students; levels of needs satisfaction of gifted and honors students; perceptions of students and teachers about program modification.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Campbell, Sheri Y. (Sheri Yuvonne)
Partner: UNT Libraries