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Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

Description: An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.
Date: January 8, 1996
Creator: Ditmire, T.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transport processes in directional solidification and their effects on microstructure development

Description: The processing of materials with unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties plays a crucial role in modern technology. The quality of these materials depend strongly on the microstructure and the solute/dopant fields in the solid product, that are strongly influenced by the intricate coupling of heat and mass transfer and melt flow in the growth systems. An integrated research program is developed that include precisely characterized experiments and detailed physical and numerical modeling of the complex transport and dynamical processes. Direct numerical simulation of the solidification process is carried out that takes into account the unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth system, and accurately models the thermal interaction between the furnace and the ampoule by appropriately using experimentally measured thermal profiles. The flow instabilities and transitions and the nonlinear evolution following the transitions are investigated by time series and flow pattern analysis. A range of complex dynamical behavior is predicted with increasing thermal Rayleigh number. The route to chaos appears as: steady convection {r_arrow} transient mono-periodic {r_arrow} transient bi-periodic {r_arrow} transient quasi-periodic {r_arrow} transient intermittent oscillation-relaxation {r_arrow} stable intermittent oscillation-relaxation attractor. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the melt flow is found to be directly related to the spatial patterns observed experimentally in the solidified crystals. The application of the model to two phase Sn-Cd peritectic alloys showed that a new class of tree-like oscillating microstructure develops in the solid phase due to unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the liquid melt. These oscillating layered structures can give the illusion of band structures on a plane of polish. The model is applied to single phase solidification in the Al-Cu and Pb-Sn systems to characterize the effect of convection on the macroscopic shape and disorder in the primary arm spacing of the cellular/dendritic freezing front. The apparently puzzling experimental observation of ...
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Mazumder, Prantik
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anisotropic magnetization and transport properties of RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm)

Description: This study of the RAgSb{sub 2} series of compounds arose as part of an investigation of rare earth intermetallic compounds containing antimony with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry. Materials with the rare earth in a position with tetragonal point symmetry frequently manifest strong anisotropies and rich complexity in the magnetic properties, and yet are simple enough to analyze. Antimony containing intermetallic compounds commonly possess low carrier densities and have only recently been the subject of study. Large single grain crystals were grown of the RAgSb{sub 2} (R=Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm) series of compounds out of a high temperature solution. This method of crystal growth, commonly known as flux growth is a versatile method which takes advantage of the decreasing solubility of the target compound with decreasing temperature. Overall, the results of the crystal growth were impressive with the synthesis of single crystals of LaAgSb{sub 2} approaching one gram. However, the sample yield diminishes as the rare earth elements become smaller and heavier. Consequently, no crystals could be grown with R=Yb or Lu. Furthermore, EuAgSb{sub 2} could not be synthesized, likely due to the divalency of the Eu ion. For most of the RAgSb{sub 2} compounds, strong magnetic anisotropies are created by the crystal electric field splitting of the Hund's rule ground state. This splitting confines the local moments to lie in the basal plane (easy plane) for the majority of the members of the series. Exceptions to this include ErAgSb{sub 2} and TmAgSb{sub 2}, which have moments along the c-axis (easy axis) and CeAgSb{sub 2}, which at intermediate temperatures has an easy plane, but exchange coupling at low temperatures is anisotropic with an easy axis. Additional anisotropy is also observed within the basal plane of DyAgSb{sub 2}, where the moments are restricted to align along ...
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Myers, Kenneth D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Elemental speciation in biomolecules by LC-ICP-MS with magnetic sector and collision cell instruments

Description: A methodology that can monitor and identify inorganic elements in biological and environmental systems was developed. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) separates biomolecules, which are then nebulized by a microconcentric nebulizer. The resulting aerosol is desolved and introduced into either a high resolution ICP-MS device or a quadrupole device with a collision cell. Because of the high sensitivity and spectral resolution and high sample introduction efficiency, many unusual or difficult elements, such as Cr, Se, Cd and U, can be observed at ambient levels bound to proteins in human serum. These measurements are made in only a few minutes without preliminary isolation and preconcentration steps. Serum samples can be titrated with spikes of various elements to determine which proteins bind a given metal and oxidation state. Experiments concerning the effects of breaking disulfide linkages and denaturation on metal binding in proteins were also investigated. Elemental distribution in liver extract was also obtained.
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Wang, Jin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A new sieving matrix for DNA sequencing, genotyping and mutation detection and high-throughput genotyping with a 96-capillary array system

Description: Capillary electrophoresis has been widely accepted as a fast separation technique in DNA analysis. In this dissertation, a new sieving matrix is described for DNA analysis, especially DNA sequencing, genetic typing and mutation detection. A high-throughput 96 capillary array electrophoresis system was also demonstrated for simultaneous multiple genotyping. The authors first evaluated the influence of different capillary coatings on the performance of DNA sequencing. A bare capillary was compared with a DB-wax, an FC-coated and a polyvinylpyrrolidone dynamically coated capillary with PEO as sieving matrix. It was found that covalently-coated capillaries had no better performance than bare capillaries while PVP coating provided excellent and reproducible results. The authors also developed a new sieving Matrix for DNA separation based on commercially available poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). This sieving matrix has a very low viscosity and an excellent self-coating effect. Successful separations were achieved in uncoated capillaries. Sequencing of M13mp18 showed good resolution up to 500 bases in treated PVP solution. Temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis and PVP solution was applied to mutation detection. A heteroduplex sample and a homoduplex reference were injected during a pair of continuous runs. A temperature gradient of 10 C with a ramp of 0.7 C/min was swept throughout the capillary. Detection was accomplished by laser induced fluorescence detection. Mutation detection was performed by comparing the pattern changes between the homoduplex and the heteroduplex samples. High throughput, high detection rate and easy operation were achieved in this system. They further demonstrated fast and reliable genotyping based on CTTv STR system by multiple-capillary array electrophoresis. The PCR products from individuals were mixed with pooled allelic ladder as an absolute standard and coinjected with a 96-vial tray. Simultaneous one-color laser-induced fluorescence detection was achieved by using a CCD camera. The allele peaks for the unknown sample were identified by comparing the normalized ...
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Gao, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High temperature phase equilibria studies in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O-Ag system

Description: A variety of experimental techniques were utilized to examine the high temperature phase equilibria in the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O-Ag system. Quenching studies were used to determine the liquid solubility of Ag in the Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (Bi2212) melt and the details of the peritectic decomposition pathway of Bi2212 as a function on Ag content and oxygen partial pressure (PO{sub 2}). A liquid immiscibility region between oxide and Ag liquids in the 8--98 at% range was found above 900 C. Two eutectics were found in the Bi2212-Ag pseudobinary. On the oxide rich side, a eutectic exists at approximately 4 at% Ag. On the Ag rich side, a eutectic exists at approximately 98 at% Ag at a temperature of 15 C below the melting point of pure Ag. Six distinct solid phases were found to be in equilibrium with the partial melt within the Ag content and PO{sub 2} range studied. The stability of these solid phases were found to be highly sensitive to PO{sub 2}, and to a much lesser extent Ag content. High temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies of this system are in conflict with these results. It is suggested that these discrepancies are due to experimental artifacts caused by the significant thermal gradients and lack of full bulk sampling which is inherent in conventional HTXRD designs. In part 2, a new furnace design compatible with synchrotron radiation sources is introduced to address these problems. This design allows for full bulk sampling in a low thermal gradient environment using Debye-Scherrer transmission geometry. Sample spinning is also introduced in the design to eliminate preferred orientation and incomplete powder averaging and allow for quantitative phase analysis and structural refinement. Studies on model systems are presented to demonstrate the capabilities for high resolution structural studies (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and time resolved phase transformation ...
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Margulies, Lawrence
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary studies on identification of inorganic species in complex mixtures by electrospray mass spectrometry in the counter ion mode

Description: Suppression of mass spectral peaks due to matrix problem is a major hurdle to overcome during identification work. So far, preliminary studies have been done in investigating solutions containing various percentages of nitric and hydrochloric acid. Since other anions would also be present in real samples, also needed to be examined is how the extent of suppression of metal complexes by Cl{sup {minus}} compares with suppression by other anions such as PO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. If suppression of other anions is as severe as that of the chloride ion, then it would be virtually impossible to analyze unknown samples containing large amount of such anions by direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry. It seems like a separation step is needed to separate these matrix anions from the metal complexes prior to putting the solution through the electrospray. However, separation of inorganic complexes can be difficult and has not been studied thoroughly as LC separation of bioorganic compounds. Both zinc and copper chloro complexes have been observed to be more tolerant to higher amount of chloride ion present in a solution compared to the group I and II metal chloro complexes. Other transition metals including the lanthanide complexes need to be examined more intensively to see how they fare against other transition metal complexes. So far, only preliminary work has been done in identifying inorganic species in solutions using both ICP-MS and ES-MS. The solution contained a number of metals but only one major anion, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Therefore, complex solutions containing a number of anions and metals can be examined to see if identification is still feasible. This identification work can be continued on into investigating real samples.
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Mollah, Sahana
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Processing of Mo-Si-B intermetallics by extrusion and oxidation properties of the extruded Tl-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB System

Description: An extrusion process was developed that is able to consistently produce large quantities of Mo-Si-B rods without the presence of defects. Binder removal from the extruded rods was studied in detail and it was determined that heating rates on the order of 0.02{degree}/minute (1.2{degree}/hour) are necessary to remove the binder without the formation of defects. This low heating rate resulted in debinding times in excess of 70 hours (approximately 3 days). Wicking was investigated as a means to decrease the time necessary for binder removal. Using 0.05{micro}m alumina powder as a wicking agent, binder removal times were reduced to 10 hours with heating rates up to 1{degree}/minute employed without defect formation. Once the extrusion process was complete the oxidation properties of the Tl-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB extruded phase assemblage was investigated. It was determined that this composition exhibits catastrophic oxidation or pesting in the temperature range of 660--760 C, resulting in the material turning to dust. Outside of this temperature range the composition is oxidatively stable. Continuous mass measurements were taken at 1,300, 1,450, and 1,600 C to determine the oxidation rate constants of this material. Parabolic rate constants of 6.9 x 10{sup {minus}3}, 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}3}, and 9.1 x 10{sup {minus}3} mg{sup 2}/cm{sup 4}/hr were determined for 1,300, 1,450, and 1,600 C respectively.
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Summers, Eric
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of alkenes and silanes by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) and a novel application of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the hydrolysis of MTO

Description: Conjugated dienes were oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as catalyst. Methylrhenium bis-peroxide was the major reactive catalyst present. Hydroxyalkenes and trisubstituted silane were also tested. Mechanisms for each of these reactions are presented.
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Tan, Haisong
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of spectral hole burning to the study of in vitro cellular systems

Description: Chapter 1 of this thesis describes the various stages of tumor development and a multitude of diagnostic techniques used to detect cancer. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the aspects of hole burning spectroscopy important for its application to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 3 gives general descriptions of cellular organelles, structures, and physical properties that can serve as possible markers for the differentiation of normal and cancerous cells. Also described in Chapter 3 are the principles of cryobiology important for low temperature spectroscopy of cells, characterization of MCF-10F (normal) and MCF-7 (cancer) cells lines which will serve as model systems, and cellular characteristics of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (APT), which was used as the test probe. Chapters 4 and 5 are previously published papers by the author pertaining to the results obtained from the application of hole burning to the study of cellular systems. Chapter 4 presents the first results obtained by spectral hole burning of cellular systems and Chapter 5 gives results for the differentiation of MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells stained with APT by an external applied electric (Stark) field. A general conclusion is presented in Chapter 6. Appendices A and B provide additional characterization of the cell/probe model systems. Appendix A describes the uptake and subcellular distribution of APT in MCF-10F and MCF-7 cells and Appendix B compares the hole burning characteristics of APT in cells when the cells are in suspension and when they are examined while adhering to a glass coverslip. Appendix C presents preliminary results for a novel probe molecule, referred to as a molecular thumbtack, designed by the authors for use in future hole burning applications to cellular systems.
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Milanovich, Nebojsa
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

Description: Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO{sub 2} were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO{sub 2} was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO{sub 2} in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.
Date: November 8, 1999
Creator: Zheng, Junwei
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An investigation of exploitation versus exploration in GBEA optimization of PORS 15 and 16 Problems

Description: It was hypothesized that the variations in time to solution are driven by the competing mechanisms of exploration and exploitation.This thesis explores this hypothesis by examining two contrasting problems that embody the hypothesized tradeoff between exploration and exploitation. Plus one recall store (PORS) is an optimization problem based on the idea of a simple calculator with four buttons: plus, one, store, and recall. Integer addition and store are classified as operations, and one and memory recall are classified as terminals. The goal is to arrange a fixed number of keystrokes in a way that maximizes the numerical result. PORS 15 (15 keystrokes) represents the subset of difficult PORS problems and PORS 16 (16 keystrokes) represents the subset of PORS problems that are easiest to optimize. The goal of this work is to examine the tradeoff between exploitation and exploration in graph based evolutionary algorithm (GBEA) optimization. To do this, computational experiments are used to examine how solutions evolve in PORS 15 and 16 problems when solved using GBEAs. The experiment is comprised of three components; the graphs and the population, the evolutionary algorithm rule set, and the example problems. The complete, hypercube, and cycle graphs were used for this experiment. A fixed population size was used.
Date: May 8, 2012
Creator: Koch, Kaelynn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC): Column design, retention processes, and applications

Description: This work describes the continued development of a new separation technique, electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC), from column design, retention mechanisms to pharmaceutical applications. The introduction section provides a literature review of the technique as well as a brief overview of the research in each of the chapters. This section is followed by four chapters which investigate the issues of EMLC column design, the retention mechanism of monosubstituted aromatic compounds, and the EMLC-based applications to two important classes of pharmaceutical compounds (i.e., corticosteroids and benzodiazepines). These four sections have been removed to process separately for inclusion on the database. The dissertation concludes with a general summary, a prospectus, and a list of references cited in the General Introduction. 32 refs.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Ting, E. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonlinear response of superconductors to alternating fields and currents

Description: This report discusses the following topics on superconductivity: nonlinearities in hard superconductors such as surface impedance of a type II superconductimg half space and harmonic generation and intermodulation due to alternating transport currents; and nonlinearities in superconducting weak links such as harmonic generation by a long Josephson Junction in a superconducting slab.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: McDonald, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved resins and novel materials and methods for solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography

Description: Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has grown to be one of the most widely used methods for isolation and preconcentration of a vast range of compounds from aqueous solutions. By modifying polymeric SPE resins with chelating functional groups, the selective uptake of metals was accomplished. The resin, along with adsorbed metals, was vaporized in the ICP and detection of the metals was then possible using either mass or emission spectroscopy. Drug analyses in biological fluids have received heightened attention as drug testing is on the increase both in sports and in the work environment. By using a direct-injection technique, biological fluids can be injected directly into the liquid chromatographic system with no pretreatment. A new surfactant, a sulfonated form of Brij-30 (Brij-S) is shown to prevent the uptake of serum proteins on commercial HPLC columns by forming a thin coating on the silica C18 surface. Excellent separations of eight or more drugs with a wide range of retention times were obtained. The separations had sharper peaks and lower retention times than similar separations performed with the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). Quantitative recovery of a number of drugs with limits of detection near 1 ppm with a 5 {micro}l injection volume were obtained. Finally, a method for solid-phase extraction in a syringe is introduced. The system greatly reduced the volume of solvent required to elute adsorbed analytes from the SPE bed while providing a semi-automated setup. SPE in a syringe consists of a very small bed of resin-loaded membrane packed into a GC or HPLC syringe. After extraction, elution was performed with just a few {micro}l of solvent. This small elution volume allowed injection of the eluent directly from the syringe into the chromatographic system, eliminating the handling problems associated with such small volumes.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Freeze, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The addition of disilanes to cumulenes

Description: The syntheses of silicon-containing compounds and the studies of their rearrangements have been active research areas in the Barton research group. Previously, the addition of disilanes to acetylenes was studied in the group and an intramolecular 2S + 2A mechanism has been proposed. In this thesis, the work is focused on the addition of disilanes to cumulenes. The syntheses of the precursors are discussed and the possible mechanisms for their thermal, photochemical and catalytic rearrangements are proposed. Conjugated organic polymers have been studied in the group since 1985 because of their potential for exhibiting high electroconductivity, photoconductivity, strong non-linear optical response and intense fluorescence. In the second section of this dissertation, the synthesis and property studies of poly(phenylene vinylene) analogues are discussed.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Chen, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

Description: Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell ({beta}TC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Tong, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders for battery application

Description: The primary objective of this research was to investigate the synthesis and characterization of Ni(OH){sub 2} powders by homogeneous precipitation. Previous research of the same method showed conflicting results and complete characterization of the particle morphology was not carried out. This study has produced precipitates having a composition of 2Ni(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}Ni(HCO{sub 3}){sub 1.85}(NO{sub 3}){sub 0.15}. The XRD patterns showed peaks commonly observed for {alpha}-Ni(OH){sub 2}. The precipitates produced from low and high cation concentration solutions showed that the mean particle size and specific surface area increased with aging time. The high specific surface area measured suggested that the particle growth occurred through the aggregation of nanosized crystallites. The TEM micrographs confirmed that the particles were actually aggregates of thin films or sheets that were crumpled and intertwined together. This work also investigated the effect of dispersant on the particle morphology. The addition of dispersants did not alter the density of the particles implying that the dispersants were not incorporated into the solid phase. A general decrease in mean particle size at each aging time was observed resulting in an increase in specific surface area. The use of dispersants provided steric hindrance for the particles in the solution to aggregate, thus smaller particles were observed. Cyclic voltammetric tests were carried out to see if the high surface area Ni(OH){sub 2} produced in this work had superior performance characteristics compared to the commercial powders currently available. Indeed, the study showed that the homogeneously precipitated Ni(OH){sub 2} had higher coulombic efficiency and degree of reversibility than the commercial powders. The efficiency values of all the homogeneously precipitated powders were approximately 90%. The same efficiency values observed were probably due to the same specific surface areas of the powders after aging in KOH solution.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Widjaja, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

Description: The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a {sup 13}C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Ontko, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Parallel hierarchical global illumination

Description: Solving the global illumination problem is equivalent to determining the intensity of every wavelength of light in all directions at every point in a given scene. The complexity of the problem has led researchers to use approximation methods for solving the problem on serial computers. Rather than using an approximation method, such as backward ray tracing or radiosity, the authors have chosen to solve the Rendering Equation by direct simulation of light transport from the light sources. This paper presents an algorithm that solves the Rendering Equation to any desired accuracy, and can be run in parallel on distributed memory or shared memory computer systems with excellent scaling properties. It appears superior in both speed and physical correctness to recent published methods involving bidirectional ray tracing or hybrid treatments of diffuse and specular surfaces. Like progressive radiosity methods, it dynamically refines the geometry decomposition where required, but does so without the excessive storage requirements for ray histories. The algorithm, called Photon, produces a scene which converges to the global illumination solution. This amounts to a huge task for a 1997-vintage serial computer, but using the power of a parallel supercomputer significantly reduces the time required to generate a solution. Currently, Photon can be run on most parallel environments from a shared memory multiprocessor to a parallel supercomputer, as well as on clusters of heterogeneous workstations.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Snell, Q.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of ions in acidic solution by capillary electrophoresis

Description: Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective method for separating ionic species according to differences in their electrophoretic mobilities. CE separations of amino acids by direct detection are difficult due to their similar electrophoretic mobilities and low absorbances. However, native amino acids can be separated by CE as cations at a low pH by adding an alkanesulfonic acid to the electrolyte carrier which imparts selectivity to the system. Derivatization is unnecessary when direct UV detection is used at 185 nm. Simultaneous speciation of metal cations such as vanadium (IV) and vanadium (V) can easily be performed without complexation prior to analysis. An indirect UV detection scheme for acidic conditions was also developed using guanidine as the background carrier electrolyte (BCE) for the indirect detection of metal cations. Three chapters have been removed for separate processing. This report contains introductory material, references, and general conclusions. 80 refs.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Thornton, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulational studies of epitaxial semiconductor superlattices: Quantum dynamical phenomena in ac and dc electric fields

Description: Using high-accuracy numerical methods the author investigates the dynamics of independent electrons in both ideal and realistic superlattices subject to arbitrary ac and/or dc electric fields. For a variety of superlattice potentials, optically excited initial wave packets, and combinations of ac and dc electric fields, he numerically solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the case of ideal periodic superlattice potentials, he investigates a long list of dynamical phenomena involving multiple miniband transitions and time-dependent electric fields. These include acceleration effects associated with interminiband transitions in strong fields, Zener resonances between minibands, dynamic localization with ac fields, increased single-miniband transport with an auxiliary resonant ac field, and enhanced or suppressed interminiband probability exchange using an auxiliary ac field. For all of the cases studied, the resulting time-dependent wave function is analyzed by projecting the data onto convenient orthonormal bases. This allows a detailed comparison with approximately analytic treatments. In an effort to explain the rapid decay of experimentally measured Bloch oscillation (BO) signals the author incorporates a one-dimensional representation of interface roughness (IR) into their superlattice potential. He shows that as a result of IR, the electron dynamics can be characterized in terms of many discrete, incommensurate frequencies near the Block frequency. Chapters 2, 3, 4 and 5 have been removed from this report and will be processed separately.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Reynolds, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and application of thin-layer spectroelectrochemical techniques for the study of organosulfur monolayers adsorbed at gold

Description: A main research interest is the characterization of monolayers formed by the spontaneous adsorption of organosulfur compounds at gold. This dissertation describes the development and application of long optical pathlength thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry in an attempt to address key issues regarding the reactivity of surface-immobilized molecules. The first section of this introductory chapter briefly describes the general approach to the preparation and characterization of these films. The last section provides an overview of the main principles and advantages of thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry for studying surface-adsorbed species. The body of this dissertation is divided into four chapters. Chapter 2 consists of a paper describing the design, construction, and characterization of a cuvette-based LOPTLC. Chapter 3 is a paper which examines the reductive desorption process using thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry to monitor and identify the desorption product. Chapter 4 is a paper describing the characterization of monolayers functionalized with a catechol terminal group which serves as a redox transformable coordination site for metal ion binding. Chapter 5 discusses the application of thin-layer spectroelectrochemistry to acid-base reactivity studies of surface-immobilized molecules. The final section provides some general conclusions and a prospectus for future studies. These chapters have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base. This report contains the introduction, references, and general conclusions. 78 refs.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Simmons, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructure-strength relationships of heavily deformed magnesium-lithium composites containing steel fibers

Description: The successful development of deformation-processed metal-metal composites (DMMC) offers the potential for ductile, high-strength structural materials with high-temperature stability. An infiltration casting process was used to permeate steel wool preforms with molten magnesium-lithium (Mg-Li) alloys. The selected matrix alloys were hexagonal close packed (HCP) Mg-4wt%Li or body centered cubic (BCC) Mg-12wt%Li; the low carbon steel wool fibers were predominantly BCC ferrite. These cast HCP/BCC and BCC/BCC composites were deformed by rolling or by extrusion and swaging. Mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture development of the composites were characterized at various levels of deformation. The HCP/BCC composites had limited formability at temperatures up to 400 C while the BCC/BCC composites had excellent formability during sheet rolling at room temperature but limited formability during swaging at room temperature. The tensile strengths of these HCP/BCC and BCC/BCC composite materials increased moderately with deformation, though less than predicted from rule of mixtures (ROM) calculations. The microstructure was characterized to correlate the filament size to the deformation strain and mechanical properties of the composite material. Stereological measurements of the filament size were used to adjust ROM calculations to reflect the actual deformation strain in the fibers. However, the experimental strengths of these composite materials were still less than ROM predictions, possibly due to the presence of considerably large fibers. Of the many models used to describe the strengthening observed in DMMC materials, the Hall-Petch relationship adequately described the experimental data. Texture development was also characterized to explain the deformation characteristics of the composite materials. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 are not included here. They are being processed separately.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Jensen, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department