1,595 Matching Results

Search Results

Closed Orbit Analysis for RHIC

Description: .
Date: February 21, 1989
Creator: J., Milutinovic & Ruggiero, A.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Closed Orbit Analysis for RHIC

Description: .
Date: March 20, 1989
Creator: J., Milutinovic & Ruggiero, A.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Greater Confinement Disposal Test at the Nevada Test Site, Final Technology Report

Description: The Greater Confinement Disposal Test (GCDT) was conducted at the Nevada Test Site to demonstrate an alternative method for management of high-specific-activity (HSA) low-level waste (LLW). The GCDT was initially conceived as a method for managing small volumes of highly concentrated tritium wastes, which, due to their environmental mobiilty, are considered unsuitable for routine shallow land disposal. Later, the scope of the GCDT was increased to address a variety of other "problem" HSA wastes including isotope sources and thermal generating wastes. The basic design for the GCDT evolved from a series of studies and assessments. Operational design objectives were to (1) emplace the wastes at a depth sufficient to minimize or eliminate routine environmental transport mechanisms and instrusion scenarios and (2) provide sufficient protection for operations personnel in the handling of HSA sources. To achieve both objectives, a large diameter borehole was selected. The GCDT consisted of a borehole 3 meters (10 feet) in diameter and 36 meters (120 feet) deep, surrounded by nine monitoring holes at varying radii. The GCDT was instrumented for the measurement of temperature, moisture, and soil-gas content. Over one million curies of HSA LLW were emplaced in GCDT. This report reviews the development of the GCDT project and presents analyses of data collected.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Dickman, P. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of the Potential for the Direct Application of Renewable Resources. Staff Issue Paper

Description: This issue paper is intended to take a general look at the direct application of renewable resources. The focus of the paper is to provide background information on what is currently known about these resources. The Council is interested in comments to supplement the information discussed in this paper. Perhaps more importantly, the Council is looking for recommendations on how to treat these resources in the next power plan. The Council is faced with at least two important questions related to this issue. First, should the Council attempt to develop detailed supply curves for these resources? Second, should programs be developed to encourage the acquisition of these resources? The direct application of renewable resources is generally defined as the use of a renewable resource such as solar, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass for the direct reduction of electrical energy use by a consumer. While there have been previous staff analysis of these resources they have not been explicitly treated in previous power plans. Given the renewed emphasis on evaluating the environmental consequences of resource development, these relatively benign resources merit further analysis. This paper will provide the basis for treatment of direct application of renewable resources in the 1990 Power Plan. Most of these resources tend to be site specific and typically require large collection areas to capture a significant amount of energy. Because of high fixed installation costs, they also tend to be most cost effective with higher usage. These characteristics generally prevent widespread regional application and limit the size of any particular resource. Early programs designed to encourage these resources focused on individual end use applications. However, given the unique characteristics of these resources, it is likely that future programs will treat these resources as one option among several conservation measures applied to a given end use or ...
Date: October 16, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and Test of the CC Cryostat Head Cart

Description: This Engineering Note documents the design of the stand to be used to transport the CC Cryostat heads into the D-Zero clean room. Due to the width of the clean room access door, the heads will have to be upright to fit through. This head cart will hold the heads upright and wheel them into the clean room on a guided track. Before the wheels are placed on the heat cart, it will be used as a stand to place the heads on for the purpose of test fitting the super insulation. The head cart will not only be structurally sufficient to support the weight of the heads but also stiff enough to allow a maximum deflection of 1/2-inch at the end of the 48-inch cylinder. The heaviest head assembly weighs about 9000 pounds. Following A.I.S.C. specifications and using a 9000 pound design load, the head cart was initially designed and built and later modified in order to meet the deflection requirements. Bending and tension stresses were limited to two thirds the yield strength. Weld and shear stresses are limited to 0.4*Fy. The C7 X 12.25 channels, the L2.5 X 2.5 X 0.25 angles adn the 1/2-inch plate are all A36 steel. In order to validate the need for an end plate in the 48-inch cylinder, an ANSYS model was created of the cylinder itself to determine it's rigidity under a point load applied at it's outer end. Appendix D contains the results which demonstrate the rigidity of the cylinder-end plate assembly. Also included is a Frame-Mac simulation of the head cart which was used to estimate the deflection at the cylinder end. A load test was performed to 133% of the rated capacity, or 12,000 pounds. The test load was incrementally applied using a crane and hook scale. A ...
Date: August 8, 1989
Creator: Jaques, Al
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department