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Flow Sizing the Cryosystem Valves

Description: The liquid argon dewar and the three cryostats which contain the modules of the D-Zero detector are cooled and maintained at a low pressure equilibrium by the use of liquid nitrogen cooling loops. The dewar has one vacuum jacketed valve at the inlet of the cooling loop and one at the outlet. Each cryostat has two inlet valves, one for the cooldown loops and one for the operating loops. in addition to an outlet valve. The flow rate of the liquid nitrogen, and hence the valve sizes and corresponding flow coefficients (C{sub v}), is deter mined by the required cooling rate of each system. The large variance between the cooling rate required for cooldown and that required for operation, and the high control resolution required, makes the selection of a valve seat and plug difficult. The liquid valve coefficient calculations do not specifically consider the size affect of gas generated within the valve by adiabatic pressure drop. See Appendix I for a calculation of the magnitude of this effect. The figures and a graphical and tabular summary of the papers conclusions are presented in Appendix II.
Date: January 19, 1989
Creator: Kurita, C.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Workshop on Calorimetery for the Superconducting Super Collider

Description: The international workshop brought together 170 participants to further develop the SSC design and performance specifications of the LAr, Gas, Scintillation, Silicon, and Warm Liquid calorimeter technologies, and to develop the general topics of Requirements, Simulation, and Electronics. Progress was made across a broad front in all areas; at the feasibility level for some and In the fine structure for others. The meeting established areas of agreement, provided some general direction, and helped to quantify some differences at widely varying levels of detector technology development. The workshop helped to level the different understandings of the participants; increased the depth of the generalists and the breadth of the specialists. A high degree of group partitioning limited access to the detailed discussion within some detector groups. The communication was clearly necessary and rewarding, and seemed to meet or exceed the expectations of most participants. This report will deal with: the Liquid Argon detector and, to a lesser extent, the Requirements working groups, an update on uranIum material logistics, and a view of LAr calorimetry by others.
Date: March 19, 1989
Creator: Mulholland, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 10, January 1--March 31, 1989

Description: The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. In this reporting period, we have utilized samples of magnesia differing in their pretreatment temperature. Both the hydrido-ruthenium complex H{sub 4}Ru{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} and its reaction product with triethyl aluminum were reacted with these samples. The two ruthenium clusters are expected to react with the magnesia surface in different ways: by deprotonation of the hydride through an acid-base reaction with the basic surface, or by hydrolysis of the aluminum-carbon bond of the triethyl aluminum adduct. The concentration of hydroxyl groups on the magnesia surface able to hydrolyze the aluminum-carbon bond for immobilation should vary depending on the temperature of the pretreatment; the concentration of basic sites which can deprotonate the cluster should also vary with temperature. These differences were borne out by the experiment. We also compared the activity of two batches of AlRu{sub 4}/MgO which had been synthesized at different times in the project. Both batches had approximately the same activity, but the newer batch had greater selectivity for C{sub 6+} hydrocarbons.
Date: May 19, 1989
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M. & Chan, Yee Wai
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Establishment and maintenance of a coal sample bank and data base

Description: During the current reporting period a total of 139 samples (46 DOE Sample Bank samples and 93 other Penn State samples) of various sizes were distributed. Sixty-three of the samples were distributed to DOE or its contractors; 76 were distributed to other agencies. A total of 88 data printouts were distributed. In addition, seven special data requests were fulfilled by either search/sort and printout or creation of a data disk. Several preliminary requests for Sample Bank and Data Base information have also been handled.
Date: April 19, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Program plan for TNX Area groundwater characterization wells

Description: The TNX Area post-Cretaceous hydrogeological section consists of an unconfined aquifer in recent to Pliestocene age sediments and a confined aquifer in tertiary aged sediments. The unconfined aquifer is a local water bearing reservoir and will not be correlated to a specific stratigraphic unit at this time. Depth to the water table ranges from 25 feet at the New TNX Seepage Basin to 50 feet at the Old TNX Seepage Basin. The unconfined aquifer is 45--50 feet thick and outcrops in the swamp to the west of TNX. The hydraulic gradient in the unconfined aquifer decreases westerly across the TNX Area from 0.05 to 0.01. The unconfined aquifer is separated from the underlying confined aquifer by a sandy slit aquitard (A1) which is approximately 5--10 feet thick. Researchers reported an increase in hydraulic head across this unit of approximately 8 feet which results in an upward gradient between the unconfined and confined aquifer. The confined Tertiary aquifer (C1) at TNX is 25--30 feet thick and can generally be found 60 to 90 feet below the surface. The C1 aquifer is part of the aquifer commonly referred to as the Congaree'' which occurs in the Congaree Formation. The C1 aquifer lies on the Lower Tertiary aquitard (A2) which is 45--55 feet thick and is commonly referred to as the Ellenton Formation.'' Currently there is an upward gradient across A2 with a head differential of 28 feet. Regional hydrogeologic models indicate that the C1 aquifer discharges to the Savannah River producing westward groundwater flow in C1. 3 figs., 1 tab.
Date: May 19, 1989
Creator: Nichols, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid heating tensile tests of hydrogen-charged high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel

Description: 316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. Proper design of the equipment will require an understanding of how tritium and its decay product helium affect mechanical properties. This memorandum describes results of rapid heating tensile testing of hydrogen-charged specimens of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 316L stainless steel. These results provide a data base for comparison with uncharged and tritium-charged-and-aged specimens to distinguish the effects of hydrogen and helium. Details of the experimental equipment and procedures and results for uncharged specimens were reported previously. 3 refs., 10 figs.
Date: May 19, 1989
Creator: Mosley, W.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

Description: Sampling Procedure: This project requires a carefully coordinated sample preparation procedure that will ensure that specimens of the proper size and physical characteristics are available for the various measurement methods used. Coherent blocks of coal will be collected in the field, with subsamples being removed in the lab by 1 inch-diameter core drill. At least 5 separate cores will be drilled from each block. Coal blocks sampled in the field will be approximately 10 inches (times) 10 inches {times} 6 inches. Distinctive compositional lithologies should be selected for sampling. For example, a section of the seam containing particularly thick vitrain or durain bands might be selected; or the block might include a mineral matter rich layer. If necessary, several blocks should be selected to represent a range in compositions. Sampling procedure must include a method for retaining moisture. The sample must not be allowed to dry out. Exposure to atmospheric oxygen should be limited as much as possible. The samples must carefully packed for shipment so as to preserve their integrity.
Date: November 19, 1989
Creator: Levine, J.R. & Tsay, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Updated summary of measurements and calculations of neutron and gamma-ray emission spectra from spheres pusled with 14-MeV neutrons: Revision 1

Description: New measurements of the neutron and gamma-ray emission spectra from materials of interest to thermonuclear reactors with a 14 MeV neutron source were done during 1986 and 1987. These measurements characterized by better resolution than those reported in the Summary published in 1982, were performed using the pulsed sphere and time-of-flight techniques. The detector used in these measurements was a NE-213 cylinder, 5.08 cm in diameter by 5.08 cm thick. The new measurements include the following materials: Be, C, N, H/sub 2/O, C/sub 2/F/sub 4/ (teflon), Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Cu, Ta, W, Au, Pb, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U. For all these materials, both the neutron and gamma emission spectra were measured. A complete tabulation of all the measurements done under the Pulse Sphere Program is presented. 37 refs., 1 tab.
Date: January 19, 1989
Creator: Hansen, L.F.; Goldberg, E.; Howerton, R.J.; Komoto, T.T. & Pohl, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental support for KrF laser modeling. Final report

Description: This paper is the final report for a project to do characterization studies on the KrF laser system. The project did experimental work on KrF lasers in support of modeling studies, with the objective being to see if this technology could be competitive for use in the ICF program. This program has provided LANL with data critical for their model development. Section 2 describes the laser extraction experiments together with the calibration of the diagnostics and the re-examination of the analysis procedure. Section 3 discusses the gain and transient absorption measurements, and Section 4 gives the conclusion for this program.
Date: July 19, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Establishment and maintenance of a coal sample bank and data base. Project status report, January 9, 1989--April 8, 1989

Description: During the current reporting period a total of 139 samples (46 DOE Sample Bank samples and 93 other Penn State samples) of various sizes were distributed. Sixty-three of the samples were distributed to DOE or its contractors; 76 were distributed to other agencies. A total of 88 data printouts were distributed. In addition, seven special data requests were fulfilled by either search/sort and printout or creation of a data disk. Several preliminary requests for Sample Bank and Data Base information have also been handled.
Date: April 19, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. First quarterly report, August 16, 1989--November 15, 1989

Description: Sampling Procedure: This project requires a carefully coordinated sample preparation procedure that will ensure that specimens of the proper size and physical characteristics are available for the various measurement methods used. Coherent blocks of coal will be collected in the field, with subsamples being removed in the lab by 1 inch-diameter core drill. At least 5 separate cores will be drilled from each block. Coal blocks sampled in the field will be approximately 10 inches (times) 10 inches {times} 6 inches. Distinctive compositional lithologies should be selected for sampling. For example, a section of the seam containing particularly thick vitrain or durain bands might be selected; or the block might include a mineral matter rich layer. If necessary, several blocks should be selected to represent a range in compositions. Sampling procedure must include a method for retaining moisture. The sample must not be allowed to dry out. Exposure to atmospheric oxygen should be limited as much as possible. The samples must carefully packed for shipment so as to preserve their integrity.
Date: November 19, 1989
Creator: Levine, J. R. & Tsay, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department