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An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

Description: {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.
Date: March 21, 2000
Creator: Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A. & Jokela, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Near-Term Demonstration of Benign, Sustainable, Nuclear Power

Description: Nuclear power reactors have been studied, researched, developed, constructed, demonstrated, deployed, operated, reviewed, discussed, praised and maligned in the United States for over half a century. These activities now transcend our national borders and nuclear power reactors are in commercial use by many nations. Throughout the world, many have been built, some have been shut down, and new ones are coming on line. Almost one-fifth of the world's electricity in 1997 was produced from these reactors. Nuclear power is no longer an unknown new technology. A large increase in world electricity demand is projected for the coming century. In lieu of endless research programs on ''new'' concepts, it is now time to proceed vigorously with widespread deployment of the best nuclear power option for which most parameters are already established. Here, we develop an aggressive approach for initiating the deployment of such a system--with the potential to produce over half of the world's electricity by mid-century, and to continue at that level for several centuries.
Date: September 21, 2000
Creator: Walter, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Top spin and experimental tests

Description: The authors examine pair mass dependence near threshold as a means to measure the spin of the top quark in hadron collisions, and they discuss the possibility that a top quark signal could be hidden among the top events.
Date: March 21, 2000
Creator: Berger, E. L. & Tait, T. M. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of surface contamination with contact mechanics

Description: The authors are particularly interested in the work of adhesion measurements as a means to facilitate the understanding of the adhesive failure mechanisms for systems containing encapsulated and bonded components. Of the several issues under investigation, one is the effect of organic contamination on the adhesive strength for several types of polymer/metal interface combinations. The specific question that the authors are trying to address is at what level of contamination does adhesive strength decrease. The use of contact mechanics, the JKR method, is a good approach for studying this question. Another approach being studied is the use of interracial fracture mechanics. The model contaminant is hexadecane--non-polar, medium molecular weight hydrocarbon fluid. They choose hexadecane because it replicates typical machining fluids, is nonreactive with Al surfaces, and should not dissolve readily into the adhesive systems of interest. The application of a uniform, controllable and reproducible hexadecane layer on Al surfaces has proven to be difficult. A primary concern is whether studies of model systems can be extended to systems of technological interest. The JKR theory is a continuum mechanics model of contact between two solid spheres that was developed by Johnson, Kendall and Roberts. The JKR theory is an extension of Hertzian contact theory and attributes the additional increase in the contact area between a soft elastomeric hemisphere to adhesive forces between the two surfaces. The JKR theory allows a direct estimate of the surface free energy of interface as well as the work of adhesion (Wa) between solids. Early studies performed in this laboratory involved the determination of Wa between silicone (PDMS) and Al surfaces in order to establish the potential adhesive failure mechanisms. However, the JKR studies using commercial based PDMS [poly(dimethylsiloxane)] was fraught with difficulty that were attributed to the additives used in commercial PDMS systems. The authors ...
Date: February 21, 2000
Creator: EMERSON,JOHN A.; MILLER,GREGORY V.; SORENSEN,CHRISTOPHER R. & PEARSON,RAYMOND A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Using the whole-building design approach to incorporate daylighting into a retail space: Preprint

Description: This paper focuses on implementation of daylighting into the Bighorn Center, a collection of home improvement retail spaces in Silverthorne, Colorado, which were constructed in three phases. Daylighting was an integral part of the design of the Phase 3 building. Energy consultants optimized the daylighting design through detailed modeling using an hourly building energy simulation tool. Energy consultants also used this tool to address the building owner's concerns related to customer comfort and increased product sales.
Date: June 21, 2000
Creator: Hayter, S.; Torcellini, P.; Eastment, M. & Judkoff, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls.

Description: The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container types for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion.
Date: June 21, 2000
Creator: Pope, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feature based volume decomposition for automatic hexahedral mesh generation

Description: Much progress has been made through these years to achieve automatic hexahedral mesh generation. While general meshing algorithms that can take on general geometry are not there yet; many well-proven automatic meshing algorithms now work on certain classes of geometry. This paper presents a feature based volume decomposition approach for automatic Hexahedral Mesh generation. In this approach, feature recognition techniques are introduced to determine decomposition features from a CAD model. The features are then decomposed and mapped with appropriate automatic meshing algorithms suitable for the correspondent geometry. Thus a formerly unmeshable CAD model may become meshable. The procedure of feature decomposition is recursive: sub-models are further decomposed until either they are matched with appropriate meshing algorithms or no more decomposition features are detected. The feature recognition methods employed are convexity based and use topology and geometry information, which is generally available in BREP solid models. The operations of volume decomposition are also detailed in the paper. The final section, the capability of the feature decomposer is demonstrated over some complicated manufactured parts.
Date: February 21, 2000
Creator: LU,YONG; GADH,RAJIT & TAUTGES,TIMOTHY J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High heat-load absorbers for the APS storage ring

Description: The power density of the dipole x-rays in the 7-GeV APS storage ring is 261 watts/mrad at 300 mA of beam current. An array of absorbers is used in the ring to shield its vacuum chambers and diagnostics components in the path of these intense x-rays. This paper describes some of the unique absorber designs that were developed to handle the requirements of high power density and UHV compatibility with no water-to-vacuum joints.
Date: July 21, 2000
Creator: Sharma, S.; Rotela, E. & Barcikowski, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A SUPER-CONDUCTING LINAC INJECTOR FOR THE BNL-AGS.

Description: This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac (SCL) as a new injector to the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Linac beam energy is in the range of 1.5 to 2.4 GeV. The beam intensity is adjusted to provide an average beam power of 4 MW at the top energy of 24 GeV. The repetition rate of the SCL-AGS facility is 5 beam pulses per second.
Date: August 21, 2000
Creator: Raparia, D. & Ruggiero, A.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Using Evolutionary Algorithms to Induce Oblique Decision Trees

Description: This paper illustrates the application of evolutionary algorithms (EAs) to the problem of oblique decision tree induction. The objectives are to demonstrate that EAs can find classifiers whose accuracy is competitive with other oblique tree construction methods, and that this can be accomplished in a shorter time. Experiments were performed with a (1+1) evolutionary strategy and a simple genetic algorithm on public domain and artificial data sets. The empirical results suggest that the EAs quickly find Competitive classifiers, and that EAs scale up better than traditional methods to the dimensionality of the domain and the number of training instances.
Date: January 21, 2000
Creator: Cantu-Paz, E. & Kamath, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STM-Induced Void Formation at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni{sub 3}Al(111) Interface

Description: Under UHV conditions at 300 K, the applied electric field and/or resulting current from an STM tip creates nanoscale voids at the interface between an epitaxial, 7.0 {angstrom} thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film and a Ni{sub 3}Al(111) substrate. This phenomenon is independent of tip polarity. Constant current (1 nA) images obtained at +0.1 V bias and +2.0 bias voltage (sample positive) reveal that voids are within the metal at the interface and, when small, are capped by the oxide film. Void size increases with time of exposure. The rate of void growth increases with applied bias/field and tunneling current, and increases significantly for field strengths >5 MV/cm, well below the dielectric breakdown threshold of 12 {+-} 1 MV/cm. Slower rates of void growth are, however, observed at lower applied field strengths. Continued growth of voids, to {approximately}30 {angstrom} deep and {approximately}500 {angstrom} wide, leads to the eventual failure of the oxide overlayer. Density Functional Theory calculations suggest a reduction-oxidation (REDOX) mechanism: interracial metal atoms are oxidized via transport into the oxide, while oxide surface Al cations are reduced to admetal species which rapidly diffuse away. This is found to be exothermic in model calculations, regardless of the details of the oxide film structure; thus, the barriers to void formation are kinetic rather than thermodynamic. We discuss our results in terms of mechanisms for the localized pitting corrosion of aluminum, as our results suggest nanovoid formation requires just electric field and current, which are ubiquitous in environmental conditions.
Date: September 21, 2000
Creator: Magtoto, N. P.; Niu, C.; Anzaldura, M.; Kelber, J. A. & Jennison, D. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Initial results of the new high intensity electron gun at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

Description: The authors report on the status of the new short bunch, high intensity electron gun at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The 1-1/2 cell L-band photocathode RF gun is expected to produce 10--100 nC bunches with 2--5 ps rms pulse length and normalized emittance less than 100 mm mrad. The beam energy at the exit of the gun cavity will be in the range 7.5--10 MeV. A standing-wave linac structure operating at the same frequency (1.3 GHz) will increase the beam energy to about 15 MeV. This beam will be used in wakefield acceleration experiments with dielectric loaded structures. These travelling-wave dielectric loaded structures, operating at 7.8 and 15.6 GHz, will be excited by the propagation of single bunches or by trains of up to 32 electron bunches.
Date: August 21, 2000
Creator: Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P. & Sun, X.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spatial Bias in Field-Estimated Unsaturated Hydraulic Properties

Description: Hydraulic property measurements often rely on non-linear inversion models whose errors vary between samples. In non-linear physical measurement systems, bias can be directly quantified and removed using calibration standards. In hydrologic systems, field calibration is often infeasible and bias must be quantified indirectly. We use a Monte Carlo error analysis to indirectly quantify spatial bias in the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K{sub s}, and the exponential relative permeability parameter, {alpha}, estimated using a tension infiltrometer. Two types of observation error are considered, along with one inversion-model error resulting from poor contact between the instrument and the medium. Estimates of spatial statistics, including the mean, variance, and variogram-model parameters, show significant bias across a parameter space representative of poorly- to well-sorted silty sand to very coarse sand. When only observation errors are present, spatial statistics for both parameters are best estimated in materials with high hydraulic conductivity, like very coarse sand. When simple contact errors are included, the nature of the bias changes dramatically. Spatial statistics are poorly estimated, even in highly conductive materials. Conditions that permit accurate estimation of the statistics for one of the parameters prevent accurate estimation for the other; accurate regions for the two parameters do not overlap in parameter space. False cross-correlation between estimated parameters is created because estimates of K{sub s} also depend on estimates of {alpha} and both parameters are estimated from the same data.
Date: December 21, 2000
Creator: HOLT,ROBERT M.; WILSON,JOHN L. & GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for SUSY with missing E{sub T} and jets at CDF

Description: Events with signatures involving large missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) are among the quintessential search modes for R-parity conserving supersymmetry. CDF has conducted two recent analyses for supersymmetry which use E{sub T} and jets. The E{sub T} and monojet signature is employed to determine process independent limits for the production of new physics beyond the Standard Model and then applied to models of spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry to determine limits on the supersymmetry breaking parameter and the gravitino mass. Direct searches for scalar top and scalar bottom quarks within the framework of supersymmetric models are performed using a signature of E{sub T} and two heavy flavor jets. Since the data is found to be consistent with Standard Model expectations, limits are determined in the mass planes m({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0})-m({tilde t}{sub 1}) and m({tilde {chi}}{sub 1}){sup 0}-m({tilde b}{sub 1}).
Date: December 21, 2000
Creator: CDF, Search for SUSY with Missing ET and Jets at
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strength of Butt and Sharp-Cornered Joints

Description: There has been considerable progress in recent years towards developing a stress intensity factor-based method for predicting crack initiation at a sharp, bimaterial comer. There is now a comprehensive understanding of the nature of multi-material, two-dimensional, linear-elastic, wedge-tip stress fields. In general, the asymptotic stress state at the apex of dissimilar bonded elastic wedges (i.e. at an interface comer) can have one or more power-law singularities of differing strength and with exponents that can be real or complex. There are, however; many configurations of practical importance, (e.g. adhesively bonded butt joints, hi-material beams, etc.) where interface-comer stresses are described by one, real-valued power-law singularity. In such cases, one can reasonably hypothesize that failure occurs at a critical value of the stress intensity factor: when K{sub a}=K{sub ac}.This approach is completely analogous to LEFM except that the critical stress intensity factor is associated with a discontinuity other than a crack. To apply the K{sub ac} criterion, one must be able to accurately calculate K{sub a} for arbitrary geometries. There are several well-established methods for calculating K{sub a}. These include matching asymptotic and detailed finite element results, evaluation of a path-independent contour integral, and general finite element methods for calculating K. for complex geometries. A rapidly expanding catalog of K{sub a} calibrations is now available for a number of geometries of practical interest. These calibrations provide convenient formulas that can be used in a failure analysis without recourse to a detailed numerical analysis. The K{sub ac} criterion has been applied with some notable successes. For example, the variation in strength of adhesively bonded butt joints with bond thickness and the dependence of this relationship on adhered stiffness is readily explained. No other one-parameter fracture criterion is able to make this sort of prediction. Nevertheless, the interface-corner fracture toughness approach is just in ...
Date: August 21, 2000
Creator: REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of Tethered Chains on Adhesion

Description: No abstract prepared.
Date: November 21, 2000
Creator: SIDES,SCOTT W.; GREST,GARY S. & STEVENS,MARK J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department