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Light source job list and plan: Part 1

Description: This note is intended to describe our current thinking and to show interconnections of various subtasks. The discussed topics are: (1) Storage Ring Group - A. Refinement of lattices to include: photons from bending magnets, dynamic aperture studies, refinement of accelerator physics straight section, B. Non-standard lattice, C. Touschek lifetime, D. Gas scattering lifetime, E. BBI (bunched beam instabilities), F. Magnet error considerations, G. tracking of particles, H. Orthogonal adjustments of beam positions and angles, (2) Injector Group, (3) Linac Group, (4) RF Group, (5) Alignment and stability, (6) Technical Components, (7) Vacuum, (8) Diagnostics, and (9) Control System.
Date: October 29, 1984
Creator: Cho, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The geology and hydrogeology of Bear Creek Valley Waste Disposal Areas A and B

Description: A study was undertaken of the Oil Landfarm and Burial Grounds A and B, which are three disposal sites within the Bear Creek Waste Disposal Area. The area is located west of the Y-12 plant, about 3 miles southwest of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of this interim report is to present data collected at the Burial Grounds A and B, and to provide the results of hydrogeologic analyses. The Oil Landfarm geologic and hydrogeologic data and analyses have been submitted in a January 1984 interim report. The overall objectives of the study were to characterize the types and extent of wastes present and to define the occurrence and movement of ground water beneath the sites. The intention of this work is to provide criteria on which a design for containing the waste can be developed. Specific activities performed by Bechtel included: drilling for subsurface geologic data; installing monitoring wells; measuring permeability and ground-water flow directions; and collecting soil, sediment, surface- and ground-water, and liquid-waste samples for chemical analysis. Results are presented on the geology and ground waters.
Date: May 1, 1984
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Description: The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.
Date: December 31, 1984
Creator: Sturchio, N.C. & Seitz, M.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations the CSIRO (Australia) monitoring program from aircraft 1972 - 1981

Description: Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations were measured in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over the Australia-New Zealand region and as far south as Antarctica for the period 1972-1981. The samples were collected from aircraft over a large range of latitudes and altitudes. The sampling program has been based on the cooperation of the Australia Department of Transport, Quantas Airways, Trans Australia Airlines, the United States, New Zealand and Australian Air Forces and occasional chartering of light aircraft for special purposes.
Date: September 1, 1984
Creator: Beardsmore, D.J. & Pearman, G.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overcoring and calibration of IRAD GAGE stressmeters at the Spent Fuel Test in Climax granite

Description: IRAD GAGE vibrating-wire stressmeters were installed in the Spent Fuel Facility at the Nevada Test Site to measure the change in in-situ stress during the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C). Although extensive pre-installation laboratory tests were conducted, they were generic in nature. Unfortunately the degree of gage-rock contact has a strong influence on gage sensitivity and cannot be predicted before installation. This report discusses the results of removing a cylindrical section of rock and gages as a unit through overcoring and the subsequent post test calibrations of the stressmeters in the laboratory. With the assumption that the gage-rock contact was not disturbed by the overcoring, the results from these calibrations compensate for varying gage-rock contact. The estimated in-situ stresses based on post test calibration data are quite consistent with those directly measured in nearby holes. The magnitude of stress change calculated from pre-installation test data is generally much smaller than that estimated from post test calibration data.
Date: September 15, 1984
Creator: Mao, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project interim acceptance specifications for Defense Waste Processing Facility and West Valley Demonstration Project waste forms and canisterized waste

Description: The waste acceptance specifications presented in this document represent the first stage of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project effort to establish specifications for the acceptance of waste forms for disposal at a nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain tuff. The only waste forms that will be dealt with in this document are the reprocessed waste forms resulting from solidification of the Savannah River Plant defense high level waste and the West Valley high level wastes. Specifications for acceptance of spent fuel will be covered in a separate document.
Date: August 1, 1984
Creator: Oversby, V.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Americium thermodynamic data for the EQ3/6 database

Description: Existing thermodynamic data for aqueous and solid species of americium have been reviewed and collected in a form that can be used with the EQ3/6 database. Data that are important in solubility calculations for americium at a proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository were emphasized. Conflicting data exist for americium complexes with carbonates. Essentially no data are available for americium solids or complexes at temperatures greater than 25{sup 0}C. 17 references, 4 figures.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Kerrisk, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SEM studies of stressed and irradiated Climax Stock quartz monzonite

Description: In an effort to find the mechanism by which gamma irradiation weakens the unconfined compressive strength of Climax Stock quartz monzonite (CSQM), sections of rock which had been irradiated and loaded to near failure were studied by scanning electron microscopy and compared to sections of rock which had been loaded but not irradiated. The quantities measured and compared were numbers and lengths of microfractures in the rock. We found that the crack parameters depended neither on irradiation treatment nor even on stress history, except in one sample which actually failed. By comparison to cracks counted in other granites by other workers, the crack statistics on CSQM are much noisier and much less indicative of stress history. CSQM is structurally more heterogeneous than the other granites, which is probably the cause of the greater noise level. 12 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.
Date: February 1, 1984
Creator: Beiriger, J.M. & Durham, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid technique for counting cracks in granitic rocks

Description: Using a scanning electron microscope and an image analyzer, we have developed a technique for counting and measuring cracks in rocks which is more efficient than traditional techniques in which an operator performs all image analysis functions. The key aspect of the technique is that black-on-white tracings of fresh cracks, which can be made rather quickly by an operator, are fed to an image analyzer which then digitizes and tabulates data. The most time-consuming step in the process has now become the generation of SEM micrographs and pertinent chemical (mineralogical) information, not the quantification of crack structure. The technique has been applied to two studies involving nuclear waste isolation in a granitic rock, Climax Stock (Nevada Test Site) quartz monzonite, a rock which is structurally very inhomogeneous. One study detected a relationship between crack structure and distance from a hammer-drilled borehole; the other study was unable to detect a relationship between crack structure and gamma irradiation treatment in rocks loaded to near failure. 12 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.
Date: January 23, 1984
Creator: Durham, W.B.; Beiriger, J.M. & Weed, H.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory search and property protection programs -- March 22, 1984

Description: On November 30, 1983, the LLNL Directorate met to discuss Laboratory policy regarding searches. An advance package (dated November 16, 1983) discussing background issues and DOE`s property protection and safeguards concerns was distributed to the Director and Associate Directors. A number of Associate Directors expressed concern about the nature of the theft problem at the Laboratory. There was also discussion about many employees` perception that Laboratory Management (including the Security Department) really did not care. The Director endorsed the need to establish searches in the SNM areas. The property protection type of searches were perceived as being very sensitive from a labor relations perspective. Nevertheless, the Directorate was sufficiently concerned about the safeguards and property protection issues to request the Security Department to develop a search plan for their review. A draft Search Program was prepared by the Security Department and reviewed individually with the Directorate for their comments. On March 19, 1984, the Directorate met collectively to consider a summary of these individual comments and to finalize a Search Program. Decisions made during that meeting have been incorporated into this document. This plan describes the search procedures that will be implemented at SNM areas and a two point program concerning property protection. Procedures are also set forth that will allow for expanded searches during periods of heightened security concern.
Date: March 22, 1984
Creator: Leary, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EQ3/6 geochemical modeling task plan for Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI)

Description: This task plan outlines work needed to upgrade the EQ3/6 geochemical code and expand the supporting data bases to allow the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) to model chemical processes important to the storage of nuclear waste in a tuff repository in the unsaturated zone. The plan covers the fiscal years 1984 to 1988. The scope of work includes the development of sub-models in the EQ3/6 code package for studying the effects of sorption, precipitation kinetics, redox disequilibrium, and radiolysis on radionuclide speciation and solubility. The work also includes a glass/water interactions model and a geochemical flow model which will allow us to study waste form leaching and reactions involving the waste package. A special emphasis is placed on verification of new capabilities as they are developed and code documentation to meet NRC requirements. Data base expansion includes the addition of elements and associated aqueous species and solid phases that are specific to nuclear waste (e.g., actinides and fission products) and the upgrading and documentation of the thermodynamic data for other species of interest.
Date: April 10, 1984
Creator: Isherwood, D. & Wolery, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fixed-fugacity option for the EQ6 geochemical reaction path code

Description: EQ3/6 is a software package used to model aqueous geochemical systems. The EQ6 code allows reaction paths of dynamic systems to be calculated. This report describes a new option for the EQ6 computer program that permits the fugacity of any gas in the EQ6 data base to be set to a fixed value. This capability permits simulation of the effect of rapid chemical exchange with a large external gas reservoir by allowing the user to fix the fugacities of selected gas species. Geochemical environments such as groundwater systems open to the atmosphere (e.g., the unsaturated zone), natural aqueous systems that form closed systems at depth, and experimental systems that use controlled atmospheres can be modeled. Two of the principal geochemical weathering agents, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, are the most likely gas species for which this type of exchange may be important. An example of the effect of constant CO{sub 2} fugacity on both open and closed systems is shown for the case of albite dissolution (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) in distilled water. This example demonstrates that the effects of imposed fugacities on geochemical systems can be considerable. This computer code is used in the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. 15 refs., 8 figs.
Date: December 20, 1984
Creator: Delany, J.M. & Wolery, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Petite sismique measurements at the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

Description: In May 1984, a petite sismique estimate of the deformation modulus (E) was carried out at the Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) at the Nevada Test site. The first part of the experiment was to repeat an earlier suite of measurements that were taken before the spent fuel was emplaced to see if any changes had resulted from heating the rock mass. The results of this measurement indicate a decrease in the modulus. However, these results are suspect in view of the findings in the second part of the experiment, which was designed to minimize the effects due to spurious resonances in the source and geophone locations. These effects were thought to bias the earlier measurements. The measurements indicate that the rock acts as a low-pass filter to the propagating wavefield. Furthermore, it is noted that the blow from a hammer is not a purely impulsive source. Therefore, depending on the type of source used and the distance away from the source, a different peak frequency and, hence, E could be measured for the same rock mass. Unless these effects are somehow factored out of a petite sismique survey, the value of E obtained could be severely biased. 20 figures.
Date: September 1, 1984
Creator: Zucca, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

Description: This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables.
Date: June 1, 1984
Creator: Knauss, K.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Seismic Hazard Models for Department of Energy Sites

Description: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed seismic and wind hazard models for the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS), Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort aimed at establishing uniform building design criteria for seismic and wind hazards at DOE sites throughout the US. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. In Phase 2, development of seismic and wind hazard models, was initiated. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake or wind speed greater than some specified magnitude. This report summarizes the final seismic hazard models and response spectra recommended for each site and the methodology used to develop these models. 15 references, 2 figures, 1 table.
Date: November 1, 1984
Creator: Coats, D.W. & Murray, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reference waste forms and packing material for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

Description: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, Calif., has been given the task of designing and verifying the performance of waste packages for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. NNWSI is studying the suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, for the potential construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository. This report gives a summary description of the three waste forms for which LLNL is designing waste packages: spent fuel, either as intact assemblies or as consolidated fuel pins, reprocessed commercial high-level waste in the form of borosilicate glass, and reprocessed defense high-level waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility in Aiken, S.C. Reference packing material for use with the alternative waste package design for spent fuel is also described. 14 references, 8 figures, 20 tables.
Date: March 30, 1984
Creator: Oversby, V.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preclosure analysis of conceptual waste package designs for a nuclear waste repository in tuff

Description: This report discusses the selection and analysis of conceptual waste package developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project for possible disposal of high-level nuclear waste at a candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The design requirements that the waste package must conform to are listed, as are several desirable design considerations. Illustrations of the reference and alternative designs are shown. Four austenitic stainless steels (316L SS, 321 SS, 304L SS and Incoloy 825 high nickel alloy) have been selected for candidate canister/overpack materials, and 1020 carbon steel has been selected as the reference metal for the borehole liners. A summary of the results of technical and ecnonmic analyses supporting the selection of the conceptual waste package designs is included. Postclosure containment and release rates are not analyzed in this report.
Date: November 1, 1984
Creator: O`Neal, W.C.; Gregg, D.W.; Hockman, J.N.; Russell, E.W. & Stein, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reaction of the Topopah Spring Tuff with J-13 water at 120{sup 0}C

Description: This report describes a series of hydrothermal experiments using crushed tuff from the Topopah Spring Member and natural ground water from well J-13. The purpose of these experiments is to define the changes in water chemistry that would result from temperature changes caused by emplacing high-level nuclear waste in a repository in the Topopah Spring tuff. Experiments were conducted at 120{sup 0}C in Teflon-lined reaction vessels at four separate rock-to-water ratios and for reaction times up to 72 days. The composition of evaporite deposits contained in the pores of the surface-outcrop rock material used in these experiments is determined from solution compositions resulting from treatment of the rock before the start of the experiments. Results from the experiments at 120{sup 0}C are compared with previous experimental results from hydrothermal reaction of the Topopah Spring tuff with J-13 water at 90 and 150{sup 0}C. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that changes in the water chemistry due to heating of the rock-water system can be expected to be very minor. There is no significant source of anions (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, or SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) in the rock; solution anion compositions after reaction of pretreated rock with J-13 water differ very little from the starting compositions. The major changes in cations are an increase in silica to approximately the level of cristobalite solubility, supersaturation of aluminum followed by slow precipitation, and fairly rapid precipitation of calcium and magnesium due to the retrograde solubility of calcite. These results are in good agreement with those previously reported for reaction of the tuff with J-13 water at 90 and 150{sup 0}C. 7 references, 7 figures, 28 tables.
Date: July 18, 1984
Creator: Oversby, V.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reaction of the Topopah Spring tuff with J-13 well water at 90{sup 0}C and 150{sup 0}C

Description: As part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is responsible for the design and testing of waste packages suitable for use in the Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain. Definition of the physical and chemical environment of the waste package is part of that task. This report describes a series of hydrothermal experiments using crushed tuff from the Topopah Spring Member and natural groundwater from Well J-13. The purpose of these experiments is to define the changes in water chemistry that would result from temperature changes caused by emplacement of high-level nuclear waste in a repository in the Topopah Spring tuff. Experiments were conducted at 90{sup 0}C and at 150{sup 0}C in Teflon-lined reaction vessels. Results are given for four rock-to-water ratios at 90{sup 0}C and for reaction times up to 72 days. Data for 150{sup 0}C cover reaction times up to 64 days and four rock-to-water ratios. The composition of evaporite deposits contained in the pores of surface outcrop rock material used in these experiments is determined and for two of the data sets rock material was pretreated to remove this calishe-type material. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that changes in the water chemistry due to heating of the rock-water system can be expected to be very minor. There is no significant source of anions (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, or SO{sub 4}/sup =/) in the rock; solution anion compositions after reaction of pretreated rock with J-13 water differ very little from the starting compositions. The major changes in cations are an increase in silica to approximately the level of cristobalite solubility, supersaturation of aluminum followed by slow precipitation, and fairly rapid precipitation of Ca and Mg due to retrograde solubility of calcite. 7 ...
Date: May 30, 1984
Creator: Oversby, V.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation doses in granite around emplacement holes in the Spent Fuel Test - Climax. Final report

Description: Final comparisons are made between measured and calculated radiation doses around the holes in which the spent fuel was emplaced in the Spent Fuel Test - Climax. Neutron doses were found to be negligible compared with gamma doses. Good agreement was found between the doses predicted by Monte Carlo calculations and those measured by short-exposure thermoluminescence dosimetry. Poor agreement was found between the calculational results and doses measured by exposure of LiF optical-absorption-type dosimeters for long periods, probably because of an inability to accurately correct for fade resulting from elevated temperature exposure over several months. The maximum dose to the rock occurred at the walls of the emplacement holes, and amounted to 1.6 MGy (1.6 x 10{sup 8} rad) in granite for the emplacement period of nearly 3 years. It is recommended that dose evaluations for future high-level nuclear waste storage facilities also be performed by combining calculations and dosimetry. Passive dosimetry techniques, if used, should involve short exposures, so that laboratory calibrations can be performed with duplicate time, temperature, dose rate, and dose parameters. An attractive alternative would be to use active ionization chambers, inserted only periodically. These could be calibrated under appropriate temperature and pressure conditions, and could be read directly. 23 references, 7 figures, 8 tables.
Date: July 26, 1984
Creator: Van Konynenburg, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of the IRAD flexible-probe sonic extensometer

Description: The evaluation of the IRAD flexible-probe sonic extensometer consisted of: a performance analysis of the MB-7D readout electronic circuit; an accuracy check of the system for both distances and small displacements; measurements of sensitivity to strong shocks; and measurements of sensitivity to temperature changes. The electronic-circuit analysis indicated an accuracy of +-0.001 in. (0.025 mm) that is limited primarily by the counter circuit. Other components of the readout circuit (e.g., crystal oscillator, pulse generator, and amplifiers) gave consistently stable and reliable responses. Sensitivity of the sonic-probe system to strong shock waves in granite was investigated with a series of high-explosive tests in the Climax tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site. Five magnetic anchors were located in a borehole, and three 50,000 g accelerometers were installed in separate boreholes nearby. Peak radial accelerations of from 2100 g up to about 32,000 g were measured after the detonation of individual line charges at varying distances. Sonic-probe readings of the distance between magnetic anchors, taken before and after each line-charge detonation, had differences that generally fell within the inherent accuracy (+-0.002 in. [0.051 mm]) for the sonic extensometer that was used. A temperature bath, which incorporated the test bed used in the displacement-accuracy tests, was designed and built to check the sensitivity of the sonic probe to temperature variations. Sonic-probe readings exhibited a definite sensitivity to temperature changes over the range of 20 to 50{sup 0}C for the four segments of the probe that were monitored. Recommendations are made for increasing the accuracy and performance of the IRAD sonic extensometer and other studies are suggested to supplement the present report. 17 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: November 1, 1984
Creator: Glenn, H.D.; Patrick, W.C.; Rector, N.L. & Butler, L.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, Fiscal Year 1983

Description: The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test is being conducted as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized April-May 1980. The spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized in March-April 1983 when test data indicated that test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this and three previous interim reports. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the 3-1/2 year duration of the test on more than 900 channels. Data acquisition from the test is now limited to instrumentation calibration and evaluation activities. Data now available for analysis are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include a campaign of in situ stress measurements, mineralogical and petrological studies of pretest core samples, microfracture analyses of laboratory irradiated cores, improved calculations of near-field heat transfer and thermomechanical response during the final months of heating as well as during a six-month cool-down period, metallurgical analyses of selected test components, and further development of the data acquisition and data management systems. 27 references, 68 figures, 10 tables.
Date: February 1, 1984
Creator: Patrick, W.C.; Butkovich, T.R.; Carlson, R.C.; Durham, W.B.; Ganow, H.C.; Hage, G.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory experiments designed to provide limits on the radionuclide source term for the NNWSI Project

Description: The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is investigating the suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain Nevada for potential use as a high-level nuclear waste repository. The horizon under investigation lies above the water table, and therefore offers a setting that differs substantially from other potential repository sites. The unsaturated zone environment allows a simple, but effective, waste package design. The source term for radionuclide release from the waste package will be based on laboratory experiments that determine the corrosion rates and mechanisms for the metal container and the dissolution rate of the waste form under expected long term conditions. This paper describes the present status of laboratory results and outlines the approach to be used in combining the data to develop a realistic source term for release of radionuclides from the waste package. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.
Date: November 1, 1984
Creator: Oversby, V.M. & McCright, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Instrumentation Report No. 3: performance and reliability of instrumentation deployed for the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

Description: A demonstration of the short-term storage and subsequent retrieval of spent nuclear fuel assemblies was successfully completed at the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site. Nearly 1000 instruments were deployed to monitor the temperature of rock, air, and metallic components of the test; displacements and stress changes within the rock mass; radiation dosage to personnel and to the rock; thermal energy input; characteristics of the ventilation airstream; and the operational status of the test. Careful selection, installation, calibration, and maintenance of these instruments ensured the acquisition of about 15.3 x 10{sup 6} high-quality data points. With few exceptions, the performance and reliability of the instrumentation and associated data acquisition system (DAS) were within specified acceptable limits. Details of the performance and reliability of the instrumentation are discussed in this report. 42 figs., 32 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1984
Creator: Patrick, W.C.; Rector, N.L. & Scarafiotti, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department