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FCC Reports, Volume 5, November 16, 1937 to June 30, 1938

Description: Biweekly, comprehensive compilation of decisions, reports, public notices, and other documents of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.
Date: 1939
Creator: United States. Federal Communications Commission.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Subsurface Geology and Oil and Gas Resources of Osage County, Oklahoma: Part 2. Townships 22 and 23 North Ranges 8 and 9 East

Description: This report is part of a series describing the structural features, the character of the oil- and gas-producing beds, and the localities where additional oil and gas may be found in parts of Osage County, Oklahoma. This part discusses the geology and resources in the southeastern part of the county, around Hominy, Oklahoma.
Date: 1939
Creator: Kirk, Charles Townsend; Jenkins, H. D.; Leatherock, Otto; Dillard, W. R.; Kennedy, L. E. & Bass, N. Wood
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Fuel Resources of the Southern Part of the Oklahoma Coal Field: Part 4. the Howe-Wilburton District, Latimer and Le Flore Counties

Description: From abstract: The Howe-Wilburton district is a narrow area of about 540 square miles that extends westward from the Arkansas State line for about 60 miles across Latimer and Le Flore Counties, Okla. It lies in the southern part of the Arkansas Valley physiographic province and is a part of the large Arkansas-Oklahoma coal field.
Date: 1939
Creator: Hendricks, Thomas Andrews
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mineral Industry of Alaska in 1938

Description: From introduction: The presentation of a yearly record of the Alaska mineral industry is a continuing service that has been rendered by the Geological Survey from almost the earliest years of extensive mining in Alaska, and the present report, for 1938, is the thirty-fifth of this series. 2 Such a record, especially when supplemented by the statistics for the preceding years, not only affords an authoritative summary of current 'and past conditions but also indicates trends that are of significance in suggesting the lines along which future developments of the industry are likely to proceed. These reports therefore serve miners, prospectors, and businessmen concerned with Alaska affairs as useful historical records, statements of contemporary conditions, and starting points on which some conjectures concerning future operations may be predicated.
Date: 1939
Creator: Smith, Philip Sidney
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Subsurface Geology and Oil and Gas Resources of Osage County, Oklahoma: Part 3. Townships 24 and 25 North Ranges 8 and 9 East

Description: This report is part of a series describing the structural features, the character of the oil- and gas-producing beds, and the localities where additional oil and gas may be found in parts of Osage County, Oklahoma. This part discusses the geology and resources in the center part of the county.
Date: 1939
Creator: Bass, N. Wood; Kennedy, L. E.; Conley, J. N. & Hengst, J. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spirit Leveling in South Carolina: Part 1. Northern South Carolina, 1896-1938

Description: From introduction: report.-This bulletin, which is published in two parts, contains the complete results of all spirit leveling done in South Carolina by the Geological Survey of the United States Department of the Interior, including those heretofore published.1 The 34th parallel of latitude, passing through Columbia, serves to divide the State into two sections, each of which is represented by one of the parts of the bulletin. Part 1 deals with the section lying north of the 34th parallel, designated as northern South Carolina, and part 2 deals with the section lying south of that parallel, designated as southern South Carolina.
Date: 1939
Creator: Staack, J. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the Twenty-Eighth National Conference on Weights and Measures, 1938

Description: Report of the annual conference on weights and measures, hosted by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards in Washington D.C. It includes conference proceedings, a list of attendees, information about committees and officers, and other reports or commentaries discussed at the meetings.
Date: 1939
Creator: United States. National Bureau of Standards.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metal-Mine Accidents in the United States During the Calendar Year 1936

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines covering accidents that happened in metal mines located in the United States including statistics for injuries, fatalities, kinds and causes of accidents, and operational data, such as number of mine workers and shifts worked.
Date: 1939
Creator: Adams, W. W. & Kolhos, M. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Practices and Methods of Preventing and Treating Crude-Oil Emulsions

Description: From Introduction: "This report describes practical methods of preventing the formation of emulsions in oil-producing operations, modern practices and methods of economically dehydrating crude-oil emulsions, and recent advances in emulsion-treating technique."
Date: 1939
Creator: Shea, G. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States, 1936

Description: Report compiled by the U.S. Bureau of Mines including statistics on fatal and non-fatal accidents in coal mines located in the United States as well as data regarding the various operations (e.g., number of miners employed and average production). The information is organized into tables for comparison and the text draws some overall conclusions in the summary.
Date: 1939
Creator: Adams, W. W.; Geyer, L. E. & Parry, M. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal Mining in Europe: A Study of Practices in Different Coal Formations and Under Various Economic and Regulatory Conditions Compared with Those in the United States

Description: From Introduction: "The major purpose of this bulletin, as indicated in the preface by Dr. John W. Finch, Director of the Bureau of Mines, is to give a critical review of the coal-mining methods used in the principal producing countries of Europe, to describe the reasons underlying the adoption of these methods, and to contrast them with coal-mining methods employed in the United States."
Date: 1939
Creator: Rice, George S. & Hartmann, Irving
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static Electricity in Nature and Industry

Description: From Introduction: "In this bulletin "static electricity" is used in its commonly accepted meaning to include the various manifestations that result from the coming together or neutralization of positive and negative charges with have been separated by friction between unlike substances or otherwise. Although the scope of the this report is rather broad, it deals primarily with static electricity as a hazard. Casual and experimental observations recorded herein are thus given for a background and for the purpose of suggesting hazards not yet recognized."
Date: 1939
Creator: Guest, Paul G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Tests of Blowers of Three Designs Operating in Conjunction with a Wing-Duct Cooling System for Radial Engines, Special Report

Description: This paper is one of several dealing with methods intended to reduce the drag of present-day radial engine installations and improve the cooling at zero and low air speeds, The present paper describes model wind-tunnel tests of blowers of three designs tested in conjunction with a wing-nacelle combination. The principle of operation involved consists of drawing cooling air into ducts located in the wing root at the point of maximum slipstream velocity, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and exhausting the air through an annular slot located between the propeller and the engine with the aid of a blower mounted on the spinner. The test apparatus consisted essentially of a stub wing having a 5-foot chord and a 15-foot span, an engine nacelle of 20 inches diameter enclosing a 25-horsepower electric motor, and three blowers mounted on propeller spinners. Two of the blowers utilize centrifugal force while the other uses the lift from airfoils to force the air out radially through the exit slot. Maximum efficiencies of over 70 percent were obtained for the system as a whole. Pressures were measured over the entire flight range which were in excess of those necessary to cool present-day engines, The results indicated that blowers mounted on propeller spinners could be built sufficiently powerful and efficient to warrant their use as the only, or chief, means of forcing air through the cooling system, so that cooling would be independent of the speed of the airplane.
Date: June 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

Description: Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.
Date: May 1939
Creator: Silverstein, Abe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of Airfoils Designed to Delay the Compressibility Burble

Description: Development of airfoil sections suitable for high-speed applications has generally been difficult because little was known of the flow phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. A definite critical speed has been found at which serious detrimental flow changes occur that lead to serious losses in lift and large increases in drag. This flow phenomenon, called the compressibility burble, was originally a propeller problem, but with the development of higher speed aircraft serious consideration must be given to other parts of the airplane. Fundamental investigations of high-speed airflow phenomenon have provided new information. An important conclusion of this work has been the determination of the critical speed, that is, the speed at which the compressibility burble occurs. The critical speed was shown to be the translational velocity at which the sum of the translational velocity and the maximum local induced velocity at the surface of the airfoil or other body equals the local speed of sound. Obviously then higher critical speeds can be attained through the development of airfoils that have minimum induced velocity for any given value of the lift coefficient. Presumably, the highest critical speed will be attained by an airfoil that has uniform chordwise distribution of induced velocity or, in other words, a flat pressure distribution curve. The ideal airfoil for any given high-speed application is, then, that form which at its operating lift coefficient has uniform chordwise distribution of induced velocity. Accordingly, an analytical search for such airfoil forms has been conducted and these forms are now being investigated experimentally in the 23-inch high-speed wind tunnel. The first airfoils investigated showed marked improvement over those forms already available, not only as to critical speed buy also the drag at low speeds is decreased considerably. Because of the immediate marked improvement, it was considered desirable to extend the ...
Date: June 1939
Creator: Stack, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary model tests of a wing-duct cooling system for radial engines, special report

Description: From Summary: "Wind-tunnel tests were conducted on a model wing-nacelle combination to determine the practicability of cooling radial engines by forcing the cooling air into wing-duct entrances located in the propeller slipstream, passing the air through the engine baffles from rear to front, and ejecting the air through an annular slot near the front of the nacelle. The drag of the cowlings tested was definitely less than for the conventional N.A.C.A. cowling, and the pressure available at low air speed corresponding to operation on the ground and at low flying speeds was apparently sufficient for cooling most present-day radial engines."
Date: February 1939
Creator: Biermann, David & Valentine, E. Floyd
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tandem Air Propellers - II

Description: Tests of three-blade, adjustable-pitch counterrotating tandem model propellers, adjusted to absorb equal power at maximum efficiency of the combination, were made at Stanford University. The aerodynamic characteristics, for blade-angle settings of 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 degrees at 0.75R of the forward propeller and for diameters spacings of 8-1/2, 15 and 30% were compared with those of three-blade and six-blade propellers of the same blade form. It was found that, in order to realize the condition of equal power at maximum efficiency, the blade angles for the rear propeller must be generally less than for the forward propeller, the difference increasing the blade angle. The tests showed that, at maximum efficiency, the tandem propellers absorb about double the power of three-blade propellers and about 8% more power than six-blade propellers having the pitch of the forward propeller of the tandem combination. The maximum efficiency of the tandem propellers was found to be from 2-15% greater than for six-blade propellers, the difference varying directly with blade angle. It was also found that the maximum efficiency of the tandem propellers was greater than that of a three-blade propeller for blade angles at 0.75R of 25 degrees or more. The difference in maximum efficiency again varied directly with blade angle, being about 9% for 65 degrees at 0.75R.
Date: October 1939
Creator: Lesley, E. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of an Electrically Heated Airplane Windshield for Ice Prevention, Special Report

Description: A study was made at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Laboratory of the operation of an electrically heated glass panel, which simulated a segment of an airplane windshield, to determine if ice formations, which usually result in the loss of visibility, could be prevented. Tests were made in the 7- by 3-foot ice tunnel, and in flight, under artificially created ice-forming conditions. Ice was prevented from forming on the windshield model in the tunnel by 1.25 watts of power per square inch with the air temperature at 23 F and a velocity of 80 miles per hour. Using an improved model in flight, ice was prevented by 1.43 watts of power per square inch of protected area and 2 watts per inch concentrated in the rim, with the air temperature at 26 F and a velocity of 120 miles per hour. The removal of a preformed ice cap was effected to a limited extent in the tunnel by the use of 1.89 watts of power per square inch when the temperature and velocity were 25 F and 80 miles per hour, respectively. The results indicate that service tests with an improved design are justified.
Date: March 1939
Creator: Rodert, Lewis A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the lift distribution over the separate wings of a biplane

Description: An investigation is made of the mutual interference of the wings of a biplane under the general assumption that each wing may be replaced by a vortex system of the type given by the Prandtl wing theory. The additional velocities induced at each wing by the presence of the other are determined by the Biot-Savart law and converted into an equivalent change in the angle of attack, the effect being that of an additional twist given to the wings in changing their lift distributions. The lift distributions computed in this manner for several airplane types are compared with the results of measurement.
Date: March 1, 1939
Creator: Kuchemann, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ice formation on wings

Description: This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.
Date: February 1, 1939
Creator: Ritz, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of theory with experiment in the phenomenon of wing flutter

Description: Direct measurements were undertaken at the Aeronautics Laboratory in Turin of the aerodynamic actions on an oscillating wing. The tests conducted had as their essential object the examination of the operation of apparatus designed for this measurement. The values experimentally obtained for the aerodynamic coefficients are in good agreement with the theory of oscillatory motion of the wing of finite span and show clear deviation from the values obtained by theory of plane motion.
Date: February 1, 1939
Creator: Cicala, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theory of two-dimensional potential flow about arbitrary wing sections

Description: Three general theories treating the potential flow about an arbitrary wing section are discussed in this report. The first theory treats the method of conformal transformation as laid down by Theodorsen and Garrick; the second is a generalization of Birnbaum's theory for moderately thick airfoils; the third is a general investigation of the complex velocity function with particular reference to the relations first discussed by F. Weinig.
Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Gebelein, H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Meteorological-physical limitations of icing in the atmosphere

Description: The icing hazard can, in most cases, be avoided by correct execution of the flights according to meteorological viewpoints and by meteorologically correct navigation (horizontal and, above all, vertical). The zones of icing hazard are usually narrowly confined. Their location can be ascertained with, in most cases, sufficient accuracy before take-off.
Date: January 1, 1939
Creator: Findeisen, W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department