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Report of the Twenty-Fourth National Conference on Weights and Measures, 1931

Description: Report of the annual conference on weights and measures, hosted by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards in Washington D.C. It includes conference proceedings, a list of attendees, information about committees and officers, and other reports or commentaries discussed at the meetings.
Date: June 1931
Creator: United States. National Bureau of Standards.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the Twenty-Third National Conference on Weights and Measures, 1930

Description: Report of the annual conference on weights and measures, hosted by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards in Washington D.C. It includes conference proceedings, a list of attendees, information about committees and officers, and other reports or commentaries discussed at the meetings.
Date: June 1931
Creator: United States. National Bureau of Standards.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Jackson Gas Field, Hinds and Rankin Counties, Mississippi

Description: From abstract: The Jackson gas field, in Hinds and Rankin Counties, Miss., is in the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, about 160 miles north of New Orleans and 40 miles, east of the Mississippi River at Vicksburg. The gas is produced from a Cretaceous chalk from 2,088 to 2,236 feet below sea level. Overlying the chalk is the regular sequence of Tertiary rocks found in Mississippi. On the crest of the anticline in the city of Jackson the Cockfield formation of the Claiborne group is exposed, surrounded by the Jackson formation. Some Forest Hill sand of the Vicksburg group is exposed in the northwestern part of the area described. Overlapping these formations are Pliocene and Pleistocene terrace and alluvial deposits, and the entire area is covered by a blanket of less of varying thickness.
Date: 1931
Creator: Monroe, Watson Hiner
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Significance of Geologic Conditions in Naval Petroleum Reserves No. 3, Wyoming

Description: From Introduction: The work on which this report is based consisted of detailed field and office studies which occupied the greater part of the summer of 1927. During this period mapping was done with plane table and telescopic alidade on a scale of 1 inch to 1,000 feet, and wells, faults, and outcrops within the productive part of the Teapot field were located in detail.
Date: 1931
Creator: Thom, W. T., Jr. & Spieker, Edmund M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Upper Cretaceous Ammonite Genus Barroisiceras in the United States

Description: From introduction: The ammonite genus Barroisiceras Grossouvre is noteworthy because of its wide geographic distribution and its apparently small stratigraphic range. It is reported from deposits of Coniacian age in Europe, Africa, South America, and North America. In the North American Upper Cretaceous it is rather rare, authentic species having been recognized hitherto only in the Austin chalk of Texas, in the Coniacian beds of Zumpango del Rio, Guerrero, Mexico, and, with doubt as to the source, in New Jersey. The Texan species, B. dentatocarinatum (Roemer), is by no means an abundant form, though among those described in early work in the region. The Mexican representatives of the genus thus far described include only fragmentary specimens not specifically named. The occurrence ascribed to New Jersey is based on a fragment that seems to belong to Barroisiceras but whose source is very doubtful.
Date: 1931
Creator: Reeside, John B., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Glaciation in Alaska

Description: From introduction: The history of glaciation in Alaska offers a fascinating field for study. Because of the remarkable development and easy accessibility of valley and piedmont glaciers in the coastal mountains, Alaska has long been popularly conceived as a land of ice and snow, a concept that is only slowly being corrected. To the student of glaciation, however, Alaska affords a unique opportunity to observe the formation, movement, and dissipation of the many living glaciers, to examine the results of glacial erosion on a gigantic scale, and to discover and work out the sequence of Pleistocene events as shown by the topographic forms in both glaciated and unglaciated areas and by the deposits left by ice and water during earlier stages of glaciation.
Date: 1931
Creator: Capps, Stephen R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Miocene Flora From Grand Coulee, Washington

Description: From introduction: The fossil plants described in the present report were collected at the north end of Grand Coulee during the summer of 1927 by Messrs. T. A. Bonser, F. A. Roberts, and Walter Bruce, of Spokane, and F. W. McCann, of Coulee City. The locality is in the big bend of the Columbia River near the northern boundary of Grant County, Wash., about 85 miles west of the plant-bearing Latah sediments around Spokane. The outcrop in Grand Coulee is about the same distance east of the crest of the Cascade Mountains, about 100 miles northeast of the plant beds at Ellensburg, which are of approximately the same age, and some 200 miles west of beds in Idaho yielding a similar flora and assigned to the Payette formation by Knowlton and others.
Date: 1931
Creator: Berry, Edward Wilber
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pliocene Fossils From Limestone in Southern Florida

Description: Abstract: This paper describes the mollusks and echinoids found in limestone dredged from ditches along the Tamiami Trail in southern Florida, in the area mapped as "Lostmans River limestone (Quaternary)" by Sanford but included in the Pliocene Caloosahatchee formation by Cooke and Mossom on the evidence of these fossils as identified by Mansfield. The matrix of the fossils is unlike the typical Caloosahatchee formation, which is sandy, but the fauna is closely related to that of the upper part of the Caloosahatchee formation and is regarded as a facies of the Caloosahatchee. The fauna shows considerable resemblance to that of the Imperial formation of California but may not be contemporaneous with it.
Date: 1931
Creator: Mansfield, Wendell C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Big Snowy Mountains, Montana

Description: From introduction: The main purpose of the field investigations on which this paper is based was to determine the structure of the mountains. The geologic formations were therefore studied, and sufficient data were obtained to construct a combined areal and structural map.
Date: 1931
Creator: Reeves, Frank
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Copper Deposits Near Keating, Oregon

Description: From abstract: The copper deposits near Keating, Oreg., in the southwestern foothills of the Wallowa Mountains, form part of a series distributed along a belt over 75 miles long. The belt containing copper deposits extends from a point west of North Powder to and beyond the Snake River at Homestead.
Date: 1931
Creator: Gilluly, James
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of nacelle-propeller combinations in various positions with reference to wings. Part I : thick wing-N.A.C.A. cowled nacelle-tractor propeller

Description: This report gives the results in the 20-foot propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on the interference drag and propulsive efficiency of a nacelle-propeller combination located in 21 positions with reference to a thick wing. The lift, drag, and propulsive efficiency were obtained at several angles of attack for each of the 21 locations. A net efficiency was derived for determining the over-all effectiveness of each nacelle location. Best results were obtained with the propeller about 25 per cent of the chord directly ahead of the leading edge. A location immediately above or below the wing near the leading edge was very poor.
Date: November 18, 1931
Creator: Wood, Donald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downwash measurements behind wings with detached float

Description: This investigation, which was made in the small wind tunnel having a diameter of 1.2 m (3.94 feet), embraced three wing models, behind which, at various angles of attack between 0 and 60 degrees, the static pressure and the total pressure along vertical lines (perpendicular to the direction of the undisturbed wind and to the wing span) were measured. The location of these vertical lines are indicated in Figure 1. Moreover, the wing polars were determined by the customary three-component measurements. For testing the pressure field, a Pitot tube and a static probe, both of 2 mm (0.08 in.) in diameter, were mounted 40 mm (1.57 in.) apart on the end of a shaft 1 m (39.37 in.) long.
Date: August 1931
Creator: Petersohn, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined pitching and yawing motion of airplanes

Description: This report treats the following problems: The beginning of the investigated motions is always a setting of the lateral controls, i.e., the rudder or the ailerons. Now, the first interesting question is how the motion would proceed if these settings were kept unchanged for some time; and particularly, what upward motion would set in, how soon, and for how long, since therein lie the dangers of yawing. Two different motions ensue with a high rate of turn and a steep down slope of flight path in both but a marked difference in angle of attack and consequently different character in the resultant aerodynamic forces: one, the "corkscrew" dive at normal angle, and the other, the "spin" at high angle.
Date: May 1931
Creator: Baranoff, A. V. & Hopf, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of valve timing upon the performance of a supercharged engine at altitude and an unsupercharged engine at sea level

Description: This investigation was conducted to determine the comparative effects of valve timing on the performance of an unsupercharged engine at sea level and a supercharged engine at altitude. The tests were conducted on the NACA universal test engine. The timing of the four valve events was varied over a wide range; the engine speeds were varied between 1,050 and 1,500 r.p.m.; the compression ratios were varied between 4.35:1 and 7.35:1. The conditions of exhaust pressure and carburetor pressure of a supercharged engine were simulated for altitudes between 0 and 18,000 feet. The results show that optimum valve timing for a supercharged engine at an altitude of 18,000 feet differs slightly from that for an unsupercharged engine at sea level. A small increase in power is obtained by using the optimum timing for 18,000 feet for altitudes above 5,000 feet. The timing of the intake opening and exhaust closing becomes more critical as the compression ratio is increased.
Date: February 4, 1931
Creator: Schey, Oscar W. & Biermann, Arnold E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiments with an airfoil model on which the boundary layers are controlled without the use of supplementary equipment

Description: This report describes test made in the Variable Density Wind Tunnel of the NACA to determine the possibility of controlling the boundary layer on the upper surface of an airfoil by use of the low pressure existing near the leading edge. The low pressure was used to induce flow through slots in the upper surface of the wing. The tests showed that the angle of attack for maximum lift was increased at the expense of a reduction in the maximum lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient.
Date: April 1931
Creator: Abbott, I. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Superchargers

Description: It seems hardly necessary to use a supercharger near sea level simply to mix the gases. The importance of the supercharger will increase with the use of heavy fuels. Before long we shall probably be using two-stroke-cycle and four-stroke-cycle scavenging engines on airplanes. In accord with the present tendency, we shall present here the French solutions of the problem in a practical rather than in a purely theoretical manner.
Date: July 1, 1931
Creator: Leglise, Pierre
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Production of Turbulence

Description: This report presents an introduction to the extensive literature on turbulence, with especial consideration of L. Prandtl's theories.
Date: March 1931
Creator: Tollmien, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A study of curvilinear flight

Description: When an airplane describes a curve it takes a certain time for it to turn from level to inclined position and then back to level again. In the following, we express the motion about the horizontal axis as "roll" or "bank" and the motion perpendicular to the vertical axis, i.e., the actual curve, as "turn." Equations and tables provide results on various aspects of turns, control settings, acceleration, inertia moments, and angular velocity.
Date: April 1, 1931
Creator: Kruse, Helmuth
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The steady spin

Description: With the object of further clarifying the problem of spinning, the equilibrium of the forces and moments acting on an airplane is discussed in light of the most recent test data. Convinced that in a spin the flight attitude by only small angles of yaw is more or less completely steady, the study is primarily devoted to an investigation of steady spin with no side slip. At small angles, wholly arbitrary and perfectly steady spins may be forced, depending on the type of control displacements. But at large angles only very steep and only "approaching steady" spins are possible, no matter what the control displacements.
Date: July 1, 1931
Creator: Fuchs, Richard & Schmidt, Wilhelm
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department