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Advanced photon source proposal for upgrading the radiation safety of x-ray labs

Description: There are two adjacent x-ray labs in building 360, each having two entrance doors. Lab A240 has two x-ray machines and lab A248 has one. All machines are equipped with sliding safety windows and microswitches to monitor the state of the windows - open or closed. Two modes of operation are possible. (1) Secure Mode in which all safety windows are closed as indicated by the microswitches. This satisfies the interlock system, allowing the high voltage power supply to be turned on. (2) Bypass Mode in which the interlock system is overridden by a key-controlled selector switch and high voltage can be turned on with machine hutch window(s) open. The bypass mode is potentially unsafe because it is possible for an operator to leave a running instrument unattended while the windows are open. Thus, it is possible for someone entering the lab to expose themselves to x-rays.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Friedman, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1991 Technical progress report of the University of South Carolina`s High Energy Physics Group, February 1990--July 1991

Description: The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina includes five teaching faculty members, one research faculty member, and five graduate students. Profs. Childers, Darden, and Wilson devote most of their research effort to Fermilab experiment E789, which is designed to observe charmless two-body decays of b-flavored mesons and baryons. Prof. Wilson works on Fermilab experiment E687 which studies charm physics in the wide-band photon beam. Profs. Rosenfeld and Wang participate in the AMY collaboration, which studies electron-positron interactions using the TRISTAN collider at KEK. Prof. Rosenfeld and one student collaborate with personnel from KEK and INS, Tokyo, on an experiment to detect a 17 keV neutrino in the {beta}-decay spectrum of {sup 63}Ni. Members of the group also participate in Fermilab Proposal P803 which will search for the oscillation of muon neutrino to tau neutrino with sensitivity better than a factor of 40 than previously achieved and in Superconducting Super Collider activities which include the development of an imaging preradiator. A brief discussion is given on progress made for each program.
Date: December 31, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cavity design and beam simulations for the APS rf gun

Description: An earlier note discussed the preliminary design of the 1-1/2 cell RF cavity for the APS RF gun. This note describes the final design, including cavity properties and simulation results from the program rf gun. The basic idea for the new design was that the successful SSRL design could be improved upon by reducing fields that had nonlinear dependence on radius. As discussed previously, this would reduce the emittance and produce tighter momentum and time distributions. In addition, it was desirable to increase the fields in the first half-cell relative to the fields in the second half-cell, in order to allow more rapid initial acceleration, which would reduce the effects of space charge. Both of these goals were accomplished in the new design.
Date: November 15, 1991
Creator: Borland, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Correction magnet power supplies for APS machine

Description: A number of correction magnets are required for the advanced photon source (APS) machine to correct the beam. There are five kinds of correction magnets for the storage ring, two for the injector synchrotron, and two for the positron accumulator ring (PAR). Table I shoes a summary of the correction magnet power supplies for the APS machine. For the storage ring, the displacement of the quadrupole magnets due to the low frequency vibration below 25 Hz has the most significant effect on the stability of the positron closed orbit. The primary external source of the low frequency vibration is the ground motion of approximately 20 {mu}m amplitude, with frequency components concentrated below 10 Hz. These low frequency vibrations can be corrected by using the correction magnets, whose field strengths are controlled individually through the feedback loop comprising the beam position monitoring system. The correction field require could be either positive or negative. Thus for all the correction magnets, bipolar power supplies (BPSs) are required to produce both polarities of correction fields. Three different types of BPS are used for all the correction magnets. Type I BPSs cover all the correction magnets for the storage ring, except for the trim dipoles. The maximum output current of the Type I BPS is 140 Adc. A Type II BPS powers a trim dipole, and its maximum output current is 60 Adc. The injector synchrotron and PAR correction magnets are powered form Type III BPSs, whose maximum output current is 25 Adc.
Date: April 1, 1991
Creator: Kang, Y.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of kicker magnet and power supply unit for synchrotron beam injection

Description: To inject beams from the positron accumulator ring (PAR) into the synchrotron, a pulsed kicker magnet is used. The specifications of this kicker magnet and the power supply unit are listed and discussed in this report.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Wang, Ju
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A high resolution detector for H{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}

Description: SSC detectors represent a challenging departure, both in size and precision, from currently operating detectors. In this note we enumerate some of the benefits of using high magnetic fields both to simplify the detector and improve its resolution and sensitivity. We have chosen an arrangement optimized to search for the reaction H{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. The arrangement also has the excellent momentum resolution for muons and electrons considered critical for the discovery of such processes as H{sup 0} {yields} Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}}, H{sup 0} {yields} Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}}, new and narrow vector bosons, and bound states of extra generational quarks. This detection scheme represents an improvement in the H{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mass resolution of at least a factor of 7 beyond the best currently proposed detectors. In addition, we have a significantly improved rejection of common H{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} backgrounds. As indeed most experiments do not exceed their initial projections, this extra factor could insure the unambiguous discovery of this decay should it indeed occur. As no reasonably realistic detector can achieve excellent detection for all physics signatures we chose to give tip on excellent hadron calorimetry. For Higgs masses between 80 and 150 GeV/c{sup 2} the Higgs decay into two photons is an excellent signature. To date, all attempts to search for this decay mode have centered on the use of electromagnetic calorimetry. We are proposing a different approach. We will convert the two photons close to the production point and measure the momenta of the electron pairs.
Date: January 14, 1991
Creator: Atiya, M.S. & Kycia, T.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental study of coupling impedance: Part I longitudinal impedance measurement techniques

Description: Beam coupling impedances for the 7-GeV APS storage ring have been numerically estimated. In order to confirm these calculations, measurements of the coupling impedance of various vacuum components around the main storage ring were done with a coaxial wire method. In this paper, the procedure of the longitudinal impedance measurement techniques will be described. As an example, sections of the Cu beam chamber, the Cu beam + antechambers, and the Al beam + antechambers were used as a device under test (DUT) to obtain the results. The transverse impedance measurements will be described in a separate paper.
Date: October 22, 1991
Creator: Song, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proof of concept of moving thru casing resistivity apparatus. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

Description: This is a continuing research effort into the new field of measuring the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells. Original research objectives are summarized as follows: Additional data confirming the feasibility of technology is to be taken in a test well with the existing stophold-and-lock apparatus which is called the Through Casing Resistivity Apparatus (``TCRA``). the already existing TCRA will then be modified mechanically and new electronic components will be fabricated to test the concept of a moving apparatus called the Moving Through Casing Resistivity Apparatus (``MTCRA``); Additional data confirming the feasibility of the technology has been obtained with the existing stop-hold-and-lock Through Casing Resistivity Apparatus (``TCRA``). Data was obtained at the frequency of 1 Hz. The vertical spacing of each voltage measurement electrode pair was approximately 57 inches. The data proves the following: the technology works as generally outlined in various patents on the subject; the cement surrounding the well does not cause substantial measurement difficulties in formations having resistivities above 10 ohm-meters; and the data shows that thin beds can be resolved. The Moving Test Jig is a laboratory instrument which realistically simulates measurements to be done later downhole. It was designed, built, and has undergone many months of testing. The Moving Test Jig has electrodes which engage the interior of a rusty, piece of test casing. It is pulled through the rusty piece of test casing at various speeds of up to about 5 feet per minute. Electrical resistors on the outside of the casing allow conduction of A.C. current off the outside of the test pipe which can be directly measured. The Moving Test Jig then measures these currents independently with the technology developed under the DOE Grant. Agreement among these measurements means that we are properly measuring the parameters necessary to calculate the ...
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Vail, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proof-of-principle test for thermoelectric generator for diesel engines; Final report

Description: In September of 1987, the principals of what is now Hi-Z TECHNOLOGY, INC. applied to the National Bureau of Standards (now National Institute of Standards and Technology, NIST) under the Energy Related Inventions Program. The invention was entitled ``Thermoelectric Generator for Diesel Engines.`` The National Institute of Standards and Technology evaluated the invention and on January 12, 1989 forwarded Recommendation Number 455 to the Department of Energy (DOE). This recommendation informed the DOE that the invention had been selected for recommendation by the NIST for possible funding by the DOE. Following the recommendation of the NIST, the DOE contacted Hi-Z to work out a development program for the generator. A contract for a grant to design, fabricate, and test a Proof-of-Principle exhaust powered thermoelectric generator for Diesel engines was signed October 19, 1989. Hi-Z provided the thermoelectric modules used in the generator as their contribution to the project. The purpose of this Grant Program was to design, build, and test a small-scale, Proof-of-Principle thermoelectric generator for a Diesel engine. 15 figs., 1 tab.
Date: July 26, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

Description: This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.
Date: December 31, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical limits on steam generation by radioactive decay heat

Description: This report briefly discusses the possibilities that flood water contacting the hot radioactive waste and rock at Yucca Mountain could produce enough steam to lift the top of the mountain off the repository.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Chesnut, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FEHMN 1.0: Finite element heat and mass transfer code

Description: A computer code is described which can simulate non-isothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. It is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and ground-water flow. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved using the finite element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat and mass transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. A summary of the equations in the model and the numerical solution procedure are provided in this report. A user`s guide and sample problems are also included. The main use of FEHMN will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields in the saturated zone below the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. 33 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1991
Creator: Zyvoloski, G.; Dash, Z. & Kelkar, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary selection criteria for the Yucca Mountain Project waste package container material

Description: The Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada for construction of a geologic repository for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) Nuclear Waste Management Project (NWMP) has the responsibility for design, testing, and performance analysis of the waste packages. The design is performed in an iterative manner in three sequential phases (conceptual design, advanced conceptual design, and license application design). An important input to the start of the advanced conceptual design is the selection of the material for the waste containers. The container material is referred to as the `metal barrier` portion of the waste package, and is the responsibility of the Metal Barrier Selection and Testing task at LLNL. The selection will consist of several steps. First, preliminary, material-independent selection criteria will be established based on the performance goals for the container. Second, a variety of engineering materials will be evaluated against these criteria in a screening process to identify candidate materials. Third, information will be obtained on the performance of the candidate materials, and final selection criteria and quantitative weighting factors will be established based on the waste package design requirements. Finally, the candidate materials will be ranked against these criteria to determine whether they meet the mandated performance requirements, and to provide a comparative score to choose the material for advanced conceptual design activities. This document sets forth the preliminary container material selection criteria to be used in screening candidate materials. 5 refs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Halsey, W. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary waste form characteristics report Version 1.0. Revision 1

Description: This report focuses on radioactive waste form characteristics that will be used to design a waste package and an engineered barrier system (EBS) for a suitable repository as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. The term waste form refers to irradiated reactor fuel, other high-level waste (HLW) in various physical forms, and other radioactive materials (other than HLW) which are received for emplacement in a geologic repository. Any encapsulating of stabilizing matrix is also referred to as a waste form.
Date: October 11, 1991
Creator: Stout, R.B. & Leider, H.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ changes in the moisture content of heated, welded tuff based on thermal neutron measurements

Description: Thermal neutron logs were collected to monitor changes in moisture content within a welded tuff rock mass heated from a borehole containing an electrical heater which remained energized for 195 days. Thermal neutron measurements were made in sampling boreholes before, during and after heating. The results generally corroborated our conceptual understanding of hydrothermal flow as well as most of the numerical modeling conducting for this study. Conceptual models have been developed in conjunction with the numerical model calculations to explain differences in the drying and re-wetting behavior above and below the heater. Numerical modeling indicated that the re-wetting of the dried-out zone was dominated by the binary diffusion of water vapor through fractures. Saturation gradients in the rock matrix resulted in relative humidity gradients which drove water vapor (primarily along fractures) back to the dried-out zone where it condensed along the fracture walls and was imbibed by the matrix. 4 refs., 28 figs.
Date: July 1, 1991
Creator: Ramirez, A.L.; Carlson, R.C. & Buscheck, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Incorporation of the capillary hysteresis model HYSTR into the numerical code TOUGH

Description: As part of the work performed to model flow in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain Nevada, a capillary hysteresis model has been developed. The computer program HYSTR has been developed to compute the hysteretic capillary pressure -- liquid saturation relationship through interpolation of tabulated data. The code can be easily incorporated into any numerical unsaturated flow simulator. A complete description of HYSTR, including a brief summary of the previous hysteresis literature, detailed description of the program, and instructions for its incorporation into a numerical simulator are given in the HYSTR user`s manual (Niemi and Bodvarsson, 1991a). This report describes the incorporation of HYSTR into the numerical code TOUGH (Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat; Pruess, 1986). The changes made and procedures for the use of TOUGH for hysteresis modeling are documented.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Niemi, A.; Bodvarsson, G.S. & Pruess, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods; Revision 1

Description: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store tightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97{degrees}C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350{degrees}C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97{degrees}C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350{degrees}C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep- related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 {times} 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97{degrees}C for the full 10000-yr analysis period. For the 4.74-kW load, the peak cladding temperature rises to just below the 350{degrees}C limit about 4 years after emplacement. If the packages are stored using the spacing specified in the Site Characterization Plan (15 ft {times} 126 ft), a maximum of 4.1 kW per container may be stored. If the 0.05-m-thick void between the container and the borehole wall is filled with loosely packed bentonite, the peak cladding temperature rises more than 40{degrees}C above the allowed cladding limit. In all cases the dominant heat transfer mode between container components is thermal radiation.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Johnson, G.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermocouple psychrometer measurements of in situ water potential changes in heated welded tuff

Description: Ten thermocouple psychrometers (TCPs) to measure water potential (WP) were installed in three holes in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site as part of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests. These integrated tests measured several parameters as a function of location and time within a few meters of a heater emplaced in welded tuff. The primary goal of the TCP experiment was to find out whether the combination of laboratory calibration and field use of the TCP can provide useful data for determining the change of moisture condition in the field. We calibrated the TCPs in NaCl solutions up to 80{degree}C(176{degree}F) in the laboratory. In two holes, we used rubber sleeves and packers to house TCPs, and in the third hole, we used foam. All three holes were grouted behind the TCP assemblages. Field results of the heater test showed that small temperature gradients were present for all measurements. Nevertheless, the WP calibration made the necessary correction for the nonisothermal condition. A drying and re-wetting cycle peaked at about day 140 with a WP of -65 bar in borehole P3, located below the heater. A similar cycle but reduced in scale was found at about day 175 with a WP of -45 bar in borehole P2, above the heater. This difference in drying behavior above and below the heater was also observed from neutron data and was explained as a gravity effect. As temperatures increased, the evaporation rate of pore water increased, In unfractured rock, the gas-phase flow was primarily outward. Water condensed above the heater would drain back to keep the boiling region wet, but water condensed below the heater would drain away from the boiling region. This conceptual model explained both the time and magnitude differences for data from holes above and below the heater. 7 refs., ...
Date: May 1, 1991
Creator: Mao, Nai-hsien & Wang, H.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

Description: This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W.; Domian, H.A. & Madson, A.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of longitudinal and transverse impedances of Ferrite-50 beampipe insert for Cornell B-Factory. Final report

Description: As outlined in M Tigner`s letter to D. Prosnitz (dated 5/16/91), our task was to calculate the longitudinal monopole (m = 0) and the transverse dipole (m = 1) impedances if a simple structure consisting of a beam pipe with a recessed ferrite (Ferrite-50) ring. In support of this goal we also undertook to compute the impedance of a small scale model for which impedance measurements had been made by L. Walling, now of SSCL. To carry out the required calculations we used the AMOS wakefield code together with a recently developed physics package that models dispersive media in the time domain. In conclusion, we found reasonable agreement with Walling`s measurements on the scale model for {ital Z}{sub {parallel}0} and for Re[{ital Z}{sub r1}]. However, there is a qualitative difference between experiment and calculation found for Im[{ital Z}{sub r1}].
Date: December 16, 1991
Creator: DeFord, J.F. & Shang, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating the time for dissolution of spent fuel exposed to unlimited water

Description: The release of radionuclides from spent fuel cannot be precisely predicted at this point because a satisfactory dissolution model based on specific chemical processes is not yet available. However, preliminary results on the dissolution rate of UO{sub 2} and spent fuel as a function of temperature and water composition have recently been reported. This information, together with data on fragment size distribution of spent fuel, are used to estimate the dissolution response of spent fuel in excess flowing water within the framework of a simple model. In this model, the reaction/dissolution front advances linearly with time and geometry is preserved. This also estimates the dissolution rate of the bulk of the fission products and higher actinides, which are uniformly distributed in the UO{sub 2} matrix and are presumed to dissolve congruently. We have used a fuel fragment distribution actually observed to calculate the time for total dissolution of spent fuel. A worst-case estimate was also made using the initial (maximum) rate of dissolution to predict the total dissolution time. The time for total dissolution of centimeter size particles is estimated to be 5.5 {times} 10{sup 4} years at 25{degrees}C.
Date: December 1, 1991
Creator: Leider, H.R.; Nguyen, S.N.; Stout, R.B. & Weed, H.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Survey of degradation modes of four nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys

Description: This report examines the degradation modes of four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys under conditions relevant to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The materials considered are Alloys C-276, C-4, C-22, and 625 because they have desirable characteristics for the conceptual design (CD) of the high-level radioactive-waste containers presented in the YMP Site Characterization Plan (SCP). The types of degradation covered in this report are general corrosion; localized corrosion, including pitting and crevice corrosion; stress corrosion cracking in chloride environments; hydrogen embrittlement (HE); and undesirable phase transformations due to a lack of phase stability. Topics not specifically addressed are welding concerns and microbiological corrosion. The four Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have excellent corrosion resistance in chloride environments such as seawater as well as in more aggressive environments. They have significantly better corrosion resistance than the six materials considered for the CD waste container in the YMP SCP. (Those six materials are Types 304L and 3161L stainless steels, Alloy 825, unalloyed copper, Cu(70)-Ni(30), and 7% aluminum bronze.) In seawater, the Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have negligible general corrosion rates and show little evidence of localized corrosion. The four base materials of these alloys are expected to have nearly indistinguishable corrosion resistance in the YMP environments. The strength requirements of the SCP-CD waste container are met by these materials in the annealed condition; in this condition, they are highly resistant to HE. Historically, HE has been noted when these materials have been strengthened (cold-worked) and used in sour gas (H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}) well service -- conditions that are not expected for the YMP. Metallurgical phase stability may be a concern under conditions favoring (1) the formation of intermetallics and carbides, and (2) microstructural ordering.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Gdowski, G.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department