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Results of design calculations for the modulator of the crossed field undulator device

Description: The modulator is a five pole wiggler with a fixed 5 cm gap. In the current design, the modulator is oriented so that the magnetic field in the device is parallel to the field in one of the undulators. The two end poles have no coil and are only half as thick as the inner poles. The end poles serve as field clamps that reduce the stray field of the modulator and the sextupole coefficient of the field integral. The center pole and the two side poles can be energized with coils. As long as the permeability is large enough within the steel the current in the center coil should be twice the current in a side coil to avoid steering the electron beam. Therefore, if the center coil has twice as many turns as the side coil, the magnet can be driven by one power supply.
Date: August 1, 1990
Creator: Sovay, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

Description: Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.
Date: September 1, 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

3-D computer simulations of EM fields in the APS vacuum chamber: Part 1, Frequency-domain analysis

Description: The vacuum chamber proposed for the storage ring of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) basically consists of two parts: the beam chamber and the antechamber, connected to each other by a narrow gap. A sector of 1-meter-long chamber with dosed end plates, to which are attached the 1-inch-diameter beampipes centered at the beam chamber, has been built for experimental purposes. The 3-D code MAFIA has been used to simulate the frequency-domain behaviors of EM fields in this setup. The results are summarized in this note and are compared with that previously obtained from 2-D simulations and that from network analyzer measurements. They are in general agreement. A parallel analysis in the time-domain is reported in a separate note. The method of our simulations can be briefly described as follows. The 1-inch diameter beampipes are terminated by conducting walls at a length of 2 cm. The whole geometry can thus be considered as a cavity. The lowest RF modes of this geometry are computed using MAFIA. The eigenfrequencies of these modes are a direct output of the eigenvalue solver E3, whereas the type of each mode is determined by employing the postprocessor P3. The mesh sizes are chosen such that they are small enough for computations in the frequency region in which we are interested (the sampling theorem), while the total number of mesh points is still well within the range that our computer system can cope with.
Date: September 4, 1990
Creator: Chou, W. & Bridges, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of the NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] unsaturated test method to actinide doped SRL [Savannah River Laboratory] 165 type glass

Description: The results of tests done using the Unsaturated Test Method are presented. These tests, done to determine the suitability of glass in a potential high-level waste repository as developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, simulate conditions anticipated for the post-containment phase of the repository when only limited contact between the waste form and water is expected. The reaction of glass occurs via processes that are initiated due to glass/water vapor and glass/liquid water contact. Vapor interaction results in the initiation of an exchange process between water and the more mobile species (alkalis and boron) in the glass. The liquid reaction produces interactions similar to those seen in standard leaching tests, except due to the limited amount of water present and the presence of partially sensitized 304L stainless steel, the formation of reaction products greatly exceeds that found in MCC-1 type leach tests. The effect of sensitized stainless steel on the reaction is to enhance breakdown of the glass matrix thereby increasing the release of the transuranic elements from the glass. However, most of the Pu and Am released is entrained by either the metal components of the test or by the reaction phases, and is not released to solution. 16 refs., 20 figs., 17 tabs.
Date: August 1, 1990
Creator: Bates, J.K. & Gerding, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

APS storage ring vacuum chamber tests for dimensional stability after bakeout cycling while under vacuum

Description: Vacuum chamber sections No. 1 and No. 2 were used for these tests. Section No. 1, a short straight section, is representative in these tests of Sections No. 3 and No. 5 as well. Section No. 2 is the longer curved section used within the dipole bend magnets and is representative of the similar Section No. 4. The combination of Sections No. 1 and No. 2 joined by a connected bellows was mounted as presently planned for the final installation. This afforded an early testing of chamber positional stability after bakeout cycling. Tests of chamber dimensional stability were also made during vacuum cycling.
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: Wehrle, R. & Nielsen, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arbitrary function generator for APS injector synchrotron correction magnets

Description: The APS injector synchrotron ring measures about 368 m in circumference. In order to obtain the precision of the magnetic field required for the positron acceleration from 450 Mev to 7.7 Gev with low beam loss, eighty correction magnets are distributed around its circumference. These magnets provide the vernier field changes required for beam orbit correction during the acceleration phase of the injector synchrotron cycle. Because of mechanical imperfections in the construction, as well as installation of real dipole and multi-pole magnets, the exact field correction required at each correction magnet location is not known until a beam is actually accelerated. It is therefore essential that a means is provided to generate a correction field that is a function of the beam energy from injection until extraction for each correction magnet. The fairly large number of correction magnets in the system requires that the arbitrary function generator design be as simple as possible yet provide the required performance. An important, required performance feature is that the function can be changed or modified ``on the fly``, to provide the operator with a real-time feel during the tune up process. The arbitrary function generator described in this report satisfies these requirements.
Date: November 7, 1990
Creator: Despe, O.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of kicker/bumper magnet and PFN for

Description: Three fast Pulsed kicker/bumper magnets are required in the positron accumulator ring (PAR) for the purpose of beam injection and/or extraction at 450 MeV. According to the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), these three magnets have, identical specifications and are expected to produce identical magnetic fields. Therefore, they will have the same design. Each kicker/bumper magnet is required to generate a magnetic field of 0.06 T with a rise time of 65 ns, a flat top of 80 ns and a fall time of 90 ns, respectively. A fast pulsed magnet system normally consists of a high voltage dc power supply, charging/discharging switches which are tetrodes and thyratrons in most cases, a pulse forming network (PFN), a magnet assembly consisting of a ferrite magnet, a matching capacitor or capacitors and a load (termination) resistor. The primary objective of this study is the design of the pulse forming network and magnet assembly.
Date: December 31, 1990
Creator: Wang, Ju & Volk, G.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of transverse loss factor for the tapered sections in the APS storage ring

Description: In the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring, the tapered sections are considered to be the main contributor to the transverse impedance. The large tube represents the beam chamber, and the small one the insertion device section. Both are connected by a tapered transition with angle {theta}. This note presents a power law dependence of the transverse loss factor on the taper angle for this structure.
Date: June 6, 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predictive modelling of boiler fouling. Final report.

Description: A spectral element method embodying Large Eddy Simulation based on Re- Normalization Group theory for simulating Sub Grid Scale viscosity was chosen for this work. This method is embodied in a computer code called NEKTON. NEKTON solves the unsteady, 2D or 3D,incompressible Navier Stokes equations by a spectral element method. The code was later extended to include the variable density and multiple reactive species effects at low Mach numbers, and to compute transport of large particles governed by inertia. Transport of small particles is computed by treating them as trace species. Code computations were performed for a number of test conditions typical of flow past a deep tube bank in a boiler. Results indicate qualitatively correct behavior. Predictions of deposition rates and deposit shape evolution also show correct qualitative behavior. These simulations are the first attempts to compute flow field results at realistic flow Reynolds numbers of the order of 10{sup 4}. Code validation was not done; comparison with experiment also could not be made as many phenomenological model parameters, e.g., sticking or erosion probabilities and their dependence on experimental conditions were not known. The predictions however demonstrate the capability to predict fouling from first principles. Further work is needed: use of large or massively parallel machine; code validation; parametric studies, etc.
Date: December 31, 1990
Creator: Chatwani, A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A preliminary analysis of the APS crotch design

Description: A preliminary design analysis of the absorber plate of the proposed crotch for the APS bending magnet radiation is presented. Various design aspects including thermal and structural considerations, material selection, geometry, and cooling method are discussed and a number of recommendations are made.
Date: March 1, 1990
Creator: Khounsary, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report.

Description: We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR are: (1) ODFW (Report A): Operate and evaluate the juvenile fish bypass system in the West Extension Irrigation District canal at Three Mile Falls Dam; and (2) CTUIR (Report 8): Examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin that includes restorations of coho salmon Oncorhynchus Wsutch and chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha and enhancement of summer steelhead 0. mytiss.
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: Nigro, Anthony A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural glass analogues to alteration of nuclear waste glass: A review and recommendations for further study

Description: The purpose of this report is to review previous work on the weathering of natural glasses; and to make recommendations for further work with respect to studying the alteration of natural glasses as it relates quantifying rates of dissolution. the first task was greatly simplified by the published papers of Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) and Byers, Jercinovic, and Ewing (1987). The second task is obviously the more difficult of the two and the author makes no claim of completeness in this regard. Glasses weather in the natural environment by reacting with aqueous solutions producing a rind of secondary solid phases. It had been proposed by some workers that the thickness of this rind is a function of the age of the glass and thus could be used to estimate glass dissolution rates. However, Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) point out that in general the rind thickness does not correlate with the age of the glass owing to the differences in time of contact with the solution compared to the actual age of the sample. It should be noted that the rate of glass dissolution is also a function of the composition of both the glass and the solution, and the temperature. Quantification of the effects of these parameters (as well as time of contact with the aqueous phase and flow rates) would thus permit a prediction of the consequences of glass-fluid interactions under varying environmental conditions. Defense high- level nuclear waste (DHLW), consisting primarily of liquid and sludge, will be encapsulated by and dispersed in a borosilicate glass before permanent storage in a HLW repository. This glass containing the DHLW serves to dilute the radionuclides and to retard their dispersion into the environment. 318 refs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: McKenzie, W.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A scoping study of water table excursions induced by seismic and volcanic events

Description: We develop conservative models of water table response to displacements just beneath the water table simulating (1) shallow intrusion of a dike and (2) high level slip on a normal fault locked at the end. For matrix flow, we fine local water table excursions of under 10 m. in cases of isotropic permeability which includes dike inflation of 4 m and fault slips corresponding to earthquakes having a moment magnitude of 7.4. Even for enhancements of vertical permeability up to 10{sup 4}:1, excursions did not exceed 15 m which implies that pumping is strongly volume limited. We also present an analysis of upward directed flow in cracks for the case of earthquake induced pore pressure changes. For matrix properties characteristic of the Calico Hills (vitric) formation and a crack distribution bounding the potential flow capacity of published data, we estimate an upper bound of 0.25 cu m. of ground water per m. of fault length as the amount capable of being pumped to a level 250 m. above the normal water table. While the presence of even larger fractures than assumed might carry more ground water to that level an absolute upper limit of less than 50 cu. m. per m. of fault length is available to be pumped assuming a value n=0.46 for the rock porosity. For less porous rocks typical of the Topopah Spring or Tiva Canyon formations (n{approx}0.10) the upper limit may be reduced to less than 10 cu. m. per m. of fault length. This upper limit depends only upon strain, the height of pumping above the water table and the formation porosity.
Date: November 1, 1990
Creator: Carrigan, C.R.; King, G.C.P. & Barr, G.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spent fuel receipt scenarios study

Description: This study reports on the results of an assignment from the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to evaluate of the effects of different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel on the potential performance of the waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. The initial evaluations were performed and an interim letter report was prepared during the fall of 1988. Subsequently, the scope of work was expanded and additional analyses were conducted in 1989. This report combines the results of the two phases of the activity. This study is a part of a broader effort to investigate the options available to the DOE and the nuclear utilities for selection of spent fuel for acceptance into the Federal Waste Management System for disposal. Each major element of the system has evaluated the effects of various options on its own operations, with the objective of providing the basis for performing system-wide trade-offs and determining an optimum acceptance scenario. Therefore, this study considers different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel by the repository only from the narrow perspective of their effect on the very-near-field temperatures in the repository following permanent closure. This report is organized into three main sections. The balance of this section is devoted to a statement of the study objective, a summary of the assumptions. The second section of the report contains a discussion of the major elements of the study. The third section summarizes the results of the study and draws some conclusions from them. The appendices include copies of the waste acceptance schedule and the existing and projected spent fuel inventory that were used in the study. 10 refs., 27 figs.
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: Ballou, L.B.; Montan, D.N. & Revelli, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal and stress analysis of hot isostatically pressed, alumina ceramic, nuclear waste containers

Description: The Yucca Mountain Project is studying design and fabrication options for a safe durable container in which to store nuclear waste underground at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The ceramic container discussed here is an alternative to using a metal container. This ceramic alternative would be selected if site conditions prove too corrosive to use metals for nuclear waste storage. Some of the engineering problems addressed in this study were: the stress generated in the alumina container by compressive loads when 4000 to 40,000 psi of external pressure is applied; the thermal stress in the container during the heating and cooling processes; the temperature histories of the container in various production scenarios and the power required for typical heaters; the fastest possible turnaround time to heat, seal, and cool the container commensurate with preserving the structural integrity of the ceramic and the closure; the testing of some commercial heating elements to determine the maximum available heat output; and the trade-offs between the minimization in thermal stress and cycle time for closure. 2 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1990
Creator: Chang, Yun & Hoenig, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal calculations pertaining to a proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository

Description: In support to the Yucca Mountain Project waste package and repository design efforts, LLNL conducted heat-transfer modeling of the volcanic tuff in the repository. The analyses quantify: the thermal response of a finite size, uniformly loaded repository where each panel of emplacement drifts contains the same type of heat source the response given a realistic waste stream inventory to show the effect of inter-panel variations; and the intra-panel response for various realistic distributions of sources within the panel. The calculations, using the PLUS family of computer codes, are based on a linear superposition, in time and in space, of the analytic solution of individual, constant output point sources located in an infinite, isotropic, and homogeneous medium with constant thermal properties. 8 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: February 1, 1990
Creator: Johnson, G.L. & Montan, D.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the committee to review the use of J-13 well water in Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

Description: The Waste Management Project Office of the Department of Energy conducted a special audit of the activities of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation Project at Livermore. It was noted that there never has been a comprehensive, well-documented examination of the basis for the use of J-13 water in the nuclear waste storage investigations. In each of the sections of This Report, an issue relating to the use of J-13 water has been addressed. 58 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Harrar, J.E.; Carley, J.F.; Isherwood, W.F. & Raber, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Update report on fracture flow in saturated tuff: Dynamic transport task for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Investigations

Description: This report summarizes the results of continuing experiments on the behavior of tracers during fracture flow in saturated, welded tuff. These experiments were completed during the past year as part of the Dynamic Transport Task of geochemical investigations for the Yucca Mountain Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy. These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of fluid movement in fractures when coupled with matrix diffusion and sorption but isolated from the effects of capillary suction and two-phase flow characteristic of unsaturated conditions. The experiments reported here are continuations of experimental efforts reported previously. The behavior of three tracers [HTO (tritiated water), TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} (pertechnetate), and sulforhodamine B dye] have been investigated during flow through a saturated column of densely welded tuff from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, southern Nevada. 31 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: November 1, 1990
Creator: Janecky, D.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Ott, M. & Mitchell, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Manganese-oxide minerals in fractures of the Crater Flat Tuff in drill core USW G-4, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

Description: The Crater Flat Tuff is almost entirely below the water table in drill hole USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Manganese-oxide minerals from the Crater Flat Tuff in USW G-4 were studied using optical, scanning electron microscopic, electron microprobe, and x-ray powder diffraction methods to determine their distribution, mineralogy, and chemistry. Manganese-oxide minerals coat fractures in all three members of the Crater Flat Tuff (Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram), but they are most abundant in fractures in the densely welded devitrified intervals of these members. The coatings are mostly of the cryptomelane/hollandite mineral group, but the chemistry of these coatings varies considerably. Some of the chemical variations, particularly the presence of calcium, sodium, and strontium, can be explained by admixture with todorokite, seen in some x-ray powder diffraction patterns. Other chemical variations, particularly between Ba and Pb, demonstrate that considerable substitution of Pb for Ba occurs in hollandite. Manganese-oxide coatings are common in the 10-m interval that produced 75% of the water pumped from USW G-4 in a flow survey in 1983. Their presence in water-producing zones suggests that manganese oxides may exert a significant chemical effect on groundwater beneath Yucca Mountain. In particular, the ability of the manganese oxides found at Yucca Mountain to be easily reduced suggests that they may affect the redox conditions of the groundwater and may oxidize dissolved or suspended species. Although the Mn oxides at Yucca Mountain have low exchange capacities, these minerals may retard the migration of some radionuclides, particularly the actinides, through scavenging and coprecipitation. 23 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: July 1, 1990
Creator: Carlos, B.A.; Bish, D.L. & Chipera, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beach and Borrow Site Sediment Investigation for a Beach Nourishment at Ocean City, Maryland

Description: Report describing the methodology used to sample and analyze sediment at Ocean City, Maryland as part of a beach nourishment project. During the project, sediment was moved from borrow sites to construct parts of the beach area; both the borrow sites and native beach were tested.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Anders, Fred J. & Hansen, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Documentation and analysis of a global CO{sub 2} model developed by Peng et al. (1983)

Description: A global carbon model, the Peng `83 model, has been standardized according to protocols developed for an intermodel comparison. The first part of this document describes the model as they received it, and the second part describes a standardized version of the model, which has been parameterized according to the protocols described. Model performance was evaluated according to defined criteria and a sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted to identify the most important parameters. The standardized model was supplemented with a calibration routine to define reasonable combinations of initial conditions. This improved the ability of the model to hold an initial equilibrium state. Sensitivity analysis showed a shift in parameter importances with time. The initial conditions were of greatest importance for the length of these simulations, but declined in longer simulations. With the initial pCO{sub 2} excluded from the sensitivity analysis, ocean surface area (used to extrapolate results) was second in importance. While the CO{sub 2} exchange rate were initially most important, the model projections of atmospheric CO{sub 2} soon became more sensitive to the alkalinity of the ocean.
Date: July 1, 1990
Creator: Jager, H.I.; Peng, T.H.; King, A.W. & Sale, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pinellas Plant facts

Description: The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.
Date: November 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental protection well inventory (U)

Description: This report is an inventory of the wells contained in Environment Protection Department (EPD) documents since the startup of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and includes wells monitored by special request and SRS research wells. All wells listed in this inventory are monitoring wells unless otherwise indicated.
Date: March 1, 1990
Creator: Janssen, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1991.

Description: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) was developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in accordance with Public Law 96-501, the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act). The purpose of the Program is to guide the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other Federal agencies in carrying out their responsibilities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife of the Columbia River Basin. The Act explicitly gives BPA the authority and responsibility to use the BPA fund for these ends, to the extent that fish and wildlife are affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric generation in the Columbia River Basin. The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan (AIWP) presents BPA's draft plans for implementing the Program during Fiscal Year (FY) 1991. The AIWP reflects the primary goals of the Council's Action Plan (Section 1400 of the Program): to provide a solid, timely, and focused basis for budgeting and planning. In addition, the AIWP provides a means to judge the progress and the success of Program implementation. The AIWP is based on the outline developed by the Policy Review Group (PRG) during Step 1 of the annual cycle of the Implementation Planning Process (IPP), which is described in Section III. This AIWP has been organized and written to meet the specific needs of Program Items 10.1-10.3. The AIWP includes schedules with key milestones for 1 and beyond, and addresses the Action Items assigned to BPA in Section 1400 of the 1987 Program and in subsequent amendments. All Program projects discussed in the AIWP are listed in Tables 1 and 2 according to their status as of September 1, 1990. Table 1 (pp. 3-14) lists completed, ongoing, and deferred projects. Table 2 (pp. 15-17) lists FY 1991 new-start projects. ...
Date: September 1990
Creator: United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department