443 Matching Results

Search Results

Global orbit corrections

Description: There are various reasons for preferring local (e.g., three bump) orbit correction methods to global corrections. One is the difficulty of solving the mN equations for the required mN correcting bumps, where N is the number of superperiods and m is the number of bumps per superperiod. The latter is not a valid reason for avoiding global corrections, since, we can take advantage of the superperiod symmetry to reduce the mN simultaneous equations to N separate problems, each involving only m simultaneous equations. Previously, I have shown how to solve the general problem when the machine contains unknown magnet errors of known probability distribution; we made measurements of known precision of the orbit displacements at a set of points, and we wish to apply correcting bumps to minimize the weighted rms orbit deviations. In this report, we will consider two simpler problems, using similar methods. We consider the case when we make M beam position measurements per superperiod, and we wish to apply an equal number M of orbit correcting bumps to reduce the measured position errors to zero. We also consider the problem when the number of correcting bumps is less than the number of measurements, and we wish to minimize the weighted rms position errors. We will see that the latter problem involves solving equations of a different form, but involving the same matrices as the former problem.
Date: November 1, 1987
Creator: Symon, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system. Quarterly report, January 22, 1987--April 30, 1987

Description: The objective of this project is the development of a coal water slurry burning residential furnace. A literature survey has been performed. Also, the preliminary testing of prototype components was carried out. Design criteria and specifications are discussed.
Date: May 1, 1987
Creator: Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A. & McPeak, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Technical progress report, April--June 1987

Description: During this period, advanced chambers were fabricated and tested in both single and tandem configurations. A scrubber was designed, constructed, installed in the facility, and checked-out. The dry pulverized coal and micronized coal water mixtures have been supplied by Energy International. Optimization of the configuration continued with respect to fuel phasing, slag handling characteristics, and tailpipe coupling.
Date: December 31, 1987
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Technical progress report, January--March 1987

Description: The systematic development of the residential combustion system is divided into three phases. Only Phases I and II are detailed here. Phase I constitutes the design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of a pulse combustor sized for residential space heating. Phase II is an optional phase to develop an integrated system including a heat exchanger. Phase III is projected as a field test of the integrated coal-fired residential space heater. The program logic is depicted in Figure 3-1. The objective of Phase I is to develop an ` advanced pulse coal combustor at the 100,000 Btu/hr scale which can later be integrated with a heat exchanger and controls to form a residential space heater. Phase I is comprised of four technical tasks which are described. The initial test fuels for the Phase I and II effort were expected to be coal slurries. However, it soon became obvious that the availability of the slurries during the development stage would be somewhat problematic and could become an impediment to maintaining progress and schedule. It was therefore decided, after discussions with the DOE Project Manager, to focus the Phase I and II effort upon the use of dry micronized coal and to consider the slurries for a product improvement activity in later phases of the program. This change will not affect the cost, schedule, or technical objectives of the Statement of Work.
Date: December 31, 1987
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a coal fired pulse combustor for residential space heating. Technical progress report, July--September 1987

Description: The systematic development of the residential combustion system is divided into three phases. Only Phase I is detailed here. Phase I constitutes the design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of a pulse combustor sized for residential space heating. Phase II is an optional phase to develop an integrated system including a heat exchanger. Phase III is projected as a field test of the integrated coal-fired residential space heater. The Phase I effort was nearing completion during this reporting period and a final report is in preparation. The configuration testing was completed early in the period and based upon results of the configuration tests, an optimized configuration for the experimental development testing was chosen. The refractory-lined chambers were fabricated and tested from mid-September through early October. The tandem unit was operated on dry micromized coal without support gas or excitation air for periods lasting from one to three hours. Performance was stable and turndown ratios of 3:1 were achieved during the first three-hour test. A early commercial residential heating system configuration has been identified on the basis of the development testing conducted throughout the first phase of this effort. The development effort indicates that the residential unit goals are achievable with some additional product improvement effort to increase carbon burn-out efficiency, reduce CO emissions and develop a reliable and compact dry, ultrafine coal feed system (not included in the present effort).
Date: December 31, 1987
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plan for metal barrier selection and testing for NNWSI

Description: The Department of Energy`s Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada as a geological repository for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The Nuclear Waste Management Projects (NWMP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has the responsibility for design, testing, and performance analysis of the NNWSI waste packages. One portion of this work is the selection and testing of the material for container construction. The anticipated container design is for this material to be a corrosion resistant metal called the metal barrier. This document is the publication version of the Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) for the Metal Barrier Selection and Testing Task. The SIP serves as a formal planning document for the investigation and is used to assign quality assurance levels to the activities of the task. This document is an informal version for information distribution and has the sections on ``Schedule and Milestones`` and ``Quality Assurance Level Assignment Sheets`` removed.
Date: December 1, 1987
Creator: Halsey, W.G. & McCright, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plan for spent fuel waste form testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations]

Description: The purpose of spent fuel waste form testing is to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from failed disposal containers holding spent fuel, under conditions appropriate to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project tuff repository. The information gathered in the activities discussed in this document will be used: to assess the performance of the waste package and engineered barrier system (EBS) with respect to the containment and release rate requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as the basis for the spent fuel waste form source term in repository-scale performance assessment modeling to calculate the cumulative releases to the accessible environment over 10,000 years to determine compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency, and as the basis for the spent fuel waste form source term in repository-scale performance assessment modeling to calculate cumulative releases over 100,000 years as required by the site evaluation process specified in the DOE siting guidelines. 34 refs.
Date: November 1, 1987
Creator: Shaw, H.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plan for glass waste form testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations]

Description: The purpose of glass waste form testing is to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from breached glass waste containers. This information will be used to qualify glass waste forms with respect to the release requirements. It will be the basis of the source term from glass waste for repository performance assessment modeling. This information will also serve as part of the source term in the calculation of cumulative releases after 100,000 years in the site evaluation process. It will also serve as part of the source term input for calculation of cumulative releases to the accessible environment for 10,000 years after disposal, to determine compliance with EPA regulations. This investigation will provide data to resolve information needs. Information about the waste forms which is provided by the producer will be accumulated and evaluated; the waste form will be tested, properties determined, and mechanisms of degradation determined; and models providing long-term evaluation of release rates designed and tested. 23 refs.
Date: September 1, 1987
Creator: Aines, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plan for integrated testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] non EQ3/6 data base portion

Description: The purposes of the Integrated Testing Task are to develop laboratory data on thermodynamic properties for actinide and fission product elements for use in the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling code; to determine the transport properties of radionuclides in the near-field environment; and develop and validate a model to describe the rate of release of radionuclides from the near-field environment. Activities to achieve the firs item have been described in the Scientific Investigation Plan for EQ3/6, where quality assurance levels were assigned to the acitivities. This Scientific Investigation Plan describes activities to achieve the second and third purposes. The information gathered in these activities will be used to assess compliance with the performance objective for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) to control the rate of release of radionuclides if the repository license application includes part of the host rock; to provide a source term for release of radionuclides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in showing compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and to provide a source term for release of radionculides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in doing calculations of cumulative releases of radionuclides from the repository over 100,000 years as required by the site evaluation process. 5 refs.
Date: May 29, 1987
Creator: Oversby, V.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Controlled blasting and its implications for the NNWSI project exploratory shaft

Description: This report reviews controlled blasting techniques for shaft sinking. Presplitting and smooth blasting are the techniques of principal interest. Smooth blasting is preferred for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations exploratory shaft. Shaft damage can be monitored visually or by peak velocity measurements and refractive techniques. Damage into the rock should be limited to 3 ft. 40 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1987
Creator: Van Eeckhout, E.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration Project: Progress report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

Description: In this report we describe the work done at Los Alamos in support of the Radionuclide Migration project during fiscal year 1986. We have continued to monitor the transport of tritium and {sup 85}Kr from the Cambric explosion zone to the satellite well, which is pumped at 600 gal/min. Corresponding movement of cationic radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr has not yet been observed after 12 yr of pumping, nor have we seen evidence that these strongly sorbing ions move in conjunction with colloids. We have analyzed more data from the Cheshire study site but have not resolved the uncertainties regarding the distribution and movement of radioactive materials at this location. Our attempts to improve our analytical capability for {sup 36}Cl and {sup 99}Tc have resulted in some progress. Similarly, we have increased our understanding of radionuclide transport phenomena such as channeling in fracture flow and anion exclusion in zeolites and clays. A sample exchange with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has helped us identify critical steps in our procedures for collecting and analyzing large-volume water samples. We have surveyed potential sites on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site for future radionuclide migration studies and conclude that there are none other than Cheshire presently available, and none are likely to be created in the near future. The Laboratory has engaged recently in radionuclide migration studies sponsored by our weapons program; we reviewed this work in an appendix to the annual report.
Date: August 1987
Creator: Thompson, J. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Manual on the Federal Budget Process

Description: The purpose of this manual is to assist users of Federal budget information in understanding how the process works and how data are to be interpreted.
Date: March 31, 1987
Creator: Schick, Allen; Keith, Robert & Davis, Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Manual on the Federal Budget Process

Description: The purpose of this manual is to assist users of Federal budget information in understanding how the process works and how data are to be interpreted.
Date: March 31, 1987
Creator: Schick, Allen; Keith, Robert & Davis, Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Continental Scientific Drilling (CSD): Technology Barriers to Deep Drilling Studies in Thermal Regimes

Description: This report is the proceedings of a workshop. The primary thrust of these discussion was to identify the major key technology barriers to the Department of Energy (DOE) supported Thermal Regimes CSD projects and to set priorities for research and development. The major technological challenge is the high temperature to be encountered at depth. Specific problems derived from this issue were widely recognized among the participants and are reflected in this summary. A major concern for the projected Thermal Regimes CSD boreholes was the technology required for continuous coring, in contrast to that required for drilling without core or spot coring. Current commercial technology bases for these two techniques are quite different. The DOE has successfully fielded projects that used both technologies, i.e, shallow continuous coring (Inyo Domes and Valles Caldera) and deeper drilling with spot cores (Imperial Valley-SSSDP). It was concluded that future scientific objectives may still require both approaches, but continuous coring is the most likely requirement in the near term. (DJE-2005)
Date: January 16, 1987
Creator: Kolstad, George A. & Rowley, John C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Medicare: Physician Payments

Description: This report discusses payments for physicians services under Medicare that are made on the basis of a fee schedule.
Date: June 24, 1987
Creator: O'Sullivan, Jennifer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Leaching of actinide-doped nuclear waste glass in a tuff-dominated system

Description: A laboratory leaching test has been performed as part of a project to evaluate the suitability of tuff rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Glass samples were placed in water inside tuff vessels, and then the tuff vessels were placed in water inside Teflon containers. Glass-component leach rates and migration through the tuff were measured for samples of the ATM-8 actinide glass, which is a PNL 76-68 based glass doped with low levels of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu to simulate wastes. Disc samples of this glass were leached at 90{sup 0}C for 30, 90, and 183 days inside tuff vessels using a natural groundwater (J-13 well-water) as the leachant. At the end of each leaching interval, the J-13 water present inside and outside the rock vessel was analyzed for glass components in solutions. Boron, molybdenum, and technetium appear to migrate through the rock at rates that depend on the porosity of each vessel and the time. The actinide elements were found only in the inner leachate. Normalized elemental mass loss values for boron, molybdenum, and technetium were calculated using concentrations of the inner and outer leachates and assuming a negligible retention on the rock. The maximum normalized release was 2.3 g/m{sup 2} for technetium. Boron, molybdenum, technetium, and neptunium were released linearly with respect to each other, with boron and molybdenum released at about 85% of the technetium rate, and neptunium at 5 to 10% of the technetium rate. Plutonium was found at low levels in the inner leachate but was strongly sorbed on the steel and Teflon supports. Neptunium was sorbed to a lesser extent. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Bazan, F.; Rego, J. & Aines, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress report on the results of testing advanced conceptual design metal barrier materials under relevant environmental conditions for a tuff repository

Description: This report discusses the performance of candidate metallic materials envisioned for fabricating waste package containers for long-term disposal at a possible geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Candidate materials include austenitic iron-base to nickel-base alloy (AISI 304L, AISI 316L, and Alloy 825), high-purity copper (CDA 102), and copper-base alloys (CDA 613 and CDA 715). Possible degradation modes affecting these container materials are identified in the context of anticipated environmental conditions at the repository site. Low-temperature oxidation is the dominant degradation mode over most of the time period of concern (minimum of 300 yr to a maximum of 1000 yr after repository closure), but various forms of aqueous corrosion will occur when water infiltrates into the near-package environment. The results of three years of experimental work in different repository-relevant environments are presented. Much of the work was performed in water taken from Well J-13, located near the repository, and some of the experiments included gamma irradiation of the water or vapor environment. The influence of metallurgical effects on the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the material is reviewed; these effects result from container fabrication, welding, and long-term aging at moderately elevated temperatures in the repository. The report indicates the need for mechanisms to understand the physical/chemical reactions that determine the nature and rate of the different degradation modes, and the subsequent need for models based on these mechanisms for projecting the long-term performance of the container from comparatively short-term laboratory data. 91 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1987
Creator: McCright, R.D.; Halsey, W.G. & Van Konynenburg, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The reaction of glass in a gamma irradiated saturated tuff environment: Part 2, Data package for ATM-1c and ATM-8 glasses

Description: A series of experiments have been performed in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project that investigate the efects of gamma radiation on groundwater and glass reaction. Experiments have been done in a gamma radiation field at exposure rates ranging between 2 x 10{sup 5} and 0 R/h, and have been performed over a period of four years. All the data that have been generated during these experiments and which were used in writing the article are presented. The report consists of a series of Tables that provide the (1) groundwater compositions; (2) glass compositions; (3) experimental matrices and selected results; (4) cation analyses; (5) anion analyses; (6) Np and Pu analyses; (7) SEM/EDS analyses; and (8) SIMS analyses exposure rates of 2 x 10{sup 5} (2R), 1 x 10{sup 3} (1R), and 0 (OR) R/h. 2 refs., 7 figs., 16 tabs.
Date: November 1, 1987
Creator: Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Fischer, D.F. & Ebert, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spent fuel performance data: An analysis of data relevant to the NNWSI Project

Description: This paper summarizes the physical and chemical properties of spent light water reactor fuel that might influence its performance as a waste form under geologic disposal conditions at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Results obtained on the dissolution testing of spent fuel conducted by the NNWSI Project are presented and discussed. Work published by other programs, in particular those of Canada and Sweden, are reviewed and compared with the NNWSI testing results. An attempt is made to relate all of the results to a common basis of presentation and to rationalize apparent conflicts between sets of results obtained under different experimental conditions.
Date: August 1, 1987
Creator: Oversby, V.M. & Shaw, H.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermomechanical calculations pertaining to experiments in the Yucca Mountain exploratory shaft

Description: Waste Package Environment Tests are being planned for the NNWSI Exploratory Shaft to provide information about the near-field hydrological, thermal, and mechanical environment of the waste package for use in assessing the expected performance of the waste package subsystem. The rationale of the tests is driven by the need for this information, but is constrained by the measurement capabilities that can be applied in situ and by the ability of analytical and numerical models to use the data obtained with the measurements. A secondary purpose of the tests is to provide the option of testing certain components that might be part of the engineered barrier system. The Waste Package Environment Tests will be located in drifts at a depth of approximately 310 m (1020 ft) in the Exploratory Shaft. The tests will be separated from one another by at least 6.1 m (20 ft) based on the need to avoid interaction of the individual tests. This planned minimum separation will be refined as scoping and design calculations proceed. The actual test locations within the access drift will be dependent on local geology. 8 refs., 28 figs.
Date: April 1, 1987
Creator: Montan, D.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An experiment to determine drilling water imbibition by in situ densely welded tuff

Description: Experiments were performed to determine the extent of penetration of drill water into Grouse Canyon densely welded tuff during use of normal drilling practices. Core samples were examined from a borehole cored in a rib of the Rock Mechanics drift in G-tunnel at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Methylene blue dye was added to the drill water to act as a tracer which stained the rock blue on contact. We found the rock stained blue only in a thin layer about 0.5 mm thick at the surface of the core. However we were concerned about the uniformity of penetration depth observed in the core and this prompted a simple experiment to test the ability of methylene blue to penetrate the matrix of densely welded tuff. We found that in the imbibition process, the dye and water separated such that the water penetrated the matrix to a much greater depth. This result meant that any interpretation of drill water imbibition in borehole core based on this dye as a tracer is unreliable. More important, however, is the conclusion that the presence of methylene blue dye on the rock indicates the presence of tracer water flow, but the absence of the dye does not rule out the presence of water flow. 6 refs.
Date: April 1, 1987
Creator: Daily, W. & Ramirez, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geochemical simulation of dissolution of West Valley and DWPF [Defense Waste Product Facility] glasses in J-13 water at 90{sup 0}C.

Description: Dissolution of West Valley and Defense Waste Product Facility (DWPF) glasses in J-13 water at 90{sup 0}C at the candidate Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository was simulated using the EQ3/6 computer code package. The objectives of the study were to attempt to predict the concentrations of radionuclides and other glass components in solution resulting from glass dissolution, and to identify potential precipitates that sequester glass components. Modified projected inventories of 10,000 year-old West Valley and DWPF SRL-165 frit glasses were used as starting glass compositions. J-13 water was considered to be representative of groundwater at Yucca Mountain. A total of 10 grams of each glass was assumed to dissolve congruently into a kilogram of J-13 water in a closed system. No inhibitions to precipitation, except for crystalline SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, were assumed to exist. Radiolysis and materials interactions were not considered. Simulation results predict that radionuclides and other glass components precipitate predominantly in the form of oxides and hydroxides, together with carbonates, silicates and phosphates. Precipitates appear to be effective in limiting the concentrations of radionuclides and other elements in solution. The general compositional trends in precipitates and solution chemistry are the same in the West Valley and DWPF simulations, except for variations arising from differences in glass chemistry. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: November 1, 1987
Creator: Bruton, C.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geomechanics of the Spent Fuel Test: Climax

Description: Three years of geomechanical measurements were made at the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) 1400 feet underground in fractured granitic rock. Heating of the rock mass resulted from emplacement of spent fuel as well as the heating by electrical heaters. Cooldown of the rock occurred after the spent fuel was removed and the heaters were turned off. The measurements program examines both gross and localized responses of the rock mass to thermal loading, to evaluate the thermomechanical response of sheared and fractured rock with that of relatively unfractured rock, to compare the magnitudes of displacements during mining with those induced by extensive heating of the rock mass, and to check assumptions regarding symmetry and damaged zones made in numerical modeling of the SFT-C. 28 refs., 113 figs., 10 tabs.
Date: July 1, 1987
Creator: Wilder, D.G. & Yow, J.L. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimates of the hydrologic impact of drilling water on core samples taken from partially saturated densely welded tuff

Description: The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which drill water might be expected to be imbibed by core samples taken from densely welded tuff. In a related experimental study conducted in G-Tunnel, drill water imbibition by the core samples was observed to be minimal. Calculations were carried out with the TOUGH code with the intent of corroborating the imbibition observations. Due to the absence of hydrologic data pertaining directly to G-Tunnel welded tuff, it was necessary to apply data from a similar formation. Because the moisture retention curve was not available for imbibition conditions, the drainage curve was applied to the model. The poor agreement between the observed and calculated imbibition data is attributed primarily to the inappropriateness of the drainage curve. Also significant is the value of absolute permeability (k) assumed in the model. Provided that the semi-log plot of the drainage and imbibition moisture retention curves are parallel within the saturation range of interest, a simple relationship exists between the moisture retention curve, k, and porosity ({phi}) which are assumed in the model and their actual values. If k and {phi} are known, we define the hysteresis factor {lambda} to be the ratio of the imbibition and drainage suction pressures for any saturation within the range of interest. If k and {phi} are unknown, {lambda} also accounts for the uncertainties in their values. Both the experimental and modeling studies show that drill water imbibition by the core has a minimal effect on its saturation state. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1987
Creator: Buscheck, T.A. & Nitao, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department