3 Matching Results

Search Results

Postglacial Volcanic Deposits at Mount Baker, Washington, and Potential Hazards From Future Eruptions

Description: Abstract: Eruptions and other geologic events at Mount Baker during the last 10,000 years have repeatedly affected adjacent areas, especially the valleys that head on the south and east sides of the volcano. Small volumes of tephra were erupted at least four times during the past 10,000 years. Future eruptions like these could cause as much as 35 centimeters of tephra to be deposited at sites 17 kilometers from the volcano, 15 centimeters of tephra to be deposited 29 kilometers from the volcano, and 5 centimeters, 44 kilometers from the volcano. Lava flows were erupted at least twice during the last 10,000 years and moved down two valleys. Future lava flows will not directly endanger people because lava typically moves so slowly that escape is possible. Hot pyroclastic flows evidently occurred during only one period and were confined to the Boulder Creek valley. Such flows can move at speeds of as much as 150 kilometers per hour and can bury valley floors under tens of meters of hot rock debris for at least 15 kilometers from the volcano. Large mudflows, most of which contain hydrothermally altered rock debris, originated at Mount Baker at least eight times during the last 10,000 years. The largest mudflow reached 29 kilometers or more down the valley of the Middle Fork Nooksack River, west of the volcano, about 6,000 years ago. Extensive masses of hydrothermally altered rock that are potentially unstable exist today near the summit of the volcano, especially in the Sherman Crater-Sherman Peak area. Avalanches of this material could be triggered by stream explosions, earthquakes, or eruptions, or may occur because of slow-acting forces or processes that gradually decrease stability. Large avalanches could move downslope at high speed and could grade downvalley into mudflows. Floods caused by rapid melting of snow and ice ...
Date: 1978
Creator: Hyde, Jack H. & Crandell, Dwight Raymond
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analyses of Washington Coals: Supplement to Technical Papers 491 and 618

Description: From Washington Coalfields: The geographical distribution of the principal coal areas of Washington is shown in figure 1. Detailed information concerning these fields is given in Bureau of Mines Technical Paper 491. Further information on the minor coal areas is given in two bulletins of the Washington Division of Mines and Geology. Analyses, plastic properties, free-swelling indexes, and agglutinating values of the separate coals, together with data on yields of carbonization products and properties of the cokes produced in laboratory tests and under operating conditions."
Date: 1958
Creator: Daniels, Joseph; Yancey, H. F.; Geer, M. R.; Abernethy, R. F.; Aresco, S. J. & Hartner, F. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department