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Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope & Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

Description: In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft (Figure 1), but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.
Date: November 9, 1999
Creator: Schamel, Steven
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MCO Monitoring activity description

Description: Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.
Date: November 9, 1998
Creator: SEXTON, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Candidate SNS Target Container Materials after Proton and Neutron Irradiation

Description: This report presents the tensile properties of EC316LN austenitic stainless steel and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel after 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses in the range 0.54 to 2.53 dpa. Irradiation temperatures were in the range 30 to 100 C. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature (20 C) and 164 C to study the effects of test temperature on the tensile properties. Test materials displayed significant radiation-induced hardening and loss of ductility due to irradiation. The EC316LN stainless steel maintained notable strain-hardening capability after irradiation, while the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel posted negative strain hardening. In the EC316LN stainless steel, increasing the test temperature from 20 C to 164 C decreased the strength by 13 to 18% and the ductility by 8 to 36%. The tensile data for the EC316LN stainless steel irradiated in spallation conditions were in line with the values in a database for 316 stainless steels for doses up to 1 dpa irradiated in fission reactors at temperatures below 200 C. However, extra strengthening induced by helium and hydrogen contents is evident in some specimens irradiated to above about 1 dpa. The effect of test temperature for the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel was less significant than for the EC316LN stainless steel. In addition, strain-hardening behaviors were analyzed for EC316LN and 316L stainless steels. The strain-hardening rate of the 316 stainless steels was largely dependent on test temperature. It was estimated that the 316 stainless steels would retain more than 1% true stains to necking at 164 C after irradiation to 5 dpa. A calculation using reduction of area (RA) measurements and stress-strain data predicted positive strain hardening during plastic instability.
Date: November 9, 2001
Creator: Byun, T.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Practical superconductor development for electrical power applications quarterly report for the period ending September 30, 2001

Description: This is a multiyear experimental research program that focuses on improving relevant material properties of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSs) and developing fabrication methods that can be transferred to industry for production of commercial conductors. A key element of this Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) program is the development of teaming relationships with industrial partners in the areas of conductor development and prototype electric power system product demonstration.
Date: November 9, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Gas-Cooled Reactor Surface Power System

Description: A human outpost on Mars requires plentiful power to assure survival of the astronauts. Anywhere from 50 to 500 kW of electric power (kWe) will be needed, depending on the number of astronauts, level of scientific activity, and life- cycle closure desired. This paper describes a 250-kWe power system based on a gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a recuperated closed Brayton cycle conversion system. The design draws upon the extensive data and engineering experience developed under the various high-temperature gas cooled reactor programs and under the SP-100 program. The reactor core is similar in power and size to the research reactors found on numerous university campuses. The fuel is uranium nitide clad in Nb 1 %Zr, which has been extensively tested under the SP-I 00 program The fiel rods are arranged in a hexagonal array within a BeO block. The BeO softens the spectrum, allowing better use of the fbel and stabilizing the geometty against deformation during impact or other loadings. The system has a negative temperature feedback coefficient so that the power level will automatically follow a variable load without the need for continuous adjustment of control elements. Waste heat is removed by an air-cooled heat exchanger using cold Martian air. The amount of radioactivity in the reactor at launch is very small (less than a Curie, and about equal to a truckload of uranium ore). The system will need to be engineered so that criticality cannot occur for any launch accident. This system is also adaptable for electric propulsion or life-support during transit to and from Mars.
Date: November 9, 1998
Creator: Harms, G.A.; Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J. & Wright, S.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A dynamic inert metal anode.

Description: A new concept for a stable anode for aluminum electrowinning is described. The anode consists of a cup-shaped metal alloy container filled with a molten salt that contains dissolved aluminum. The metal alloy can be any of a number of alloys, but it must contain aluminum as a secondary alloying metal. A possible alloy composition is copper with 5 to 15 weight percent aluminum. In the presence of oxygen, aluminum on the metal anode's exterior surface forms a continuous alumina film that is thick enough to protect the anode from chemical attack by cryolite during electrolysis and thin enough to maintain electrical conductivity. However, the alumina film is soluble in cryolite, so it must be regenerated in situ. Film regeneration is achieved by the transport of aluminum metal from the anode's molten salt interior through the metal wall to the anode's exterior surface, where the transported aluminum oxidizes to alumina in the presence of evolving oxygen to maintain the protective alumina film. Periodic addition of aluminum metal to the anode's interior keeps the aluminum activity in the molten salt at the desired level. This concept for an inert anode is viable as long as the amount of aluminum produced at the cathode greatly exceeds the amount of aluminum required to maintain the anode's protective film.
Date: November 9, 1998
Creator: Hryn, J. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline plasma sprayed coatings

Description: Our lab has been working with plasma spraying of both high pressure gas atomized (HPGA) and cast and crushed quasicrystal powders. A major component of this research includes comparative studies of PAS coatings formed with starting powders prepared by both techniques. In addition, a thorough investigation of the effects of starting powder particle size on coating microstructure is included. During the course of the overall research, an interest developed in forming Al-Cu-Fe materials with finer grain sizes. Therefore, a brief study was performed to characterize the effect of adding boron to Al-Cu-Fe materials prepared by different techniques. In addition to characterizing the microstructural features of the above materials, oxidation and wear behavior was also examined.
Date: November 9, 1995
Creator: Daniel, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Discrete-fracture modeling of thermal-hydrological processes at Yucca Mountain and the LLNL G-Tunnel heater test

Description: An in situ heater test was performed at G-Tunnel, Nevada Nuclear Test Site, to investigate the thermal-hydrological response of unsaturated, fractured volcanic tuff under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. The NUFT flow and transport code was used to model the test using discrete-fracture and equivalent-continuum approaches. Nonequilibrium fracture flow and thermal buoyant gas-phase convection were found to be the likely causes for observed lack of condensate imbibition into the matrix. The potential repository at Yucca Mountain was also modeled. Disequilibrium fracture flow is predicted to occur for less than a hundred years after emplacement followed by a period of fracture-matrix equilibrium, during which the equivalent-continuum and discrete-fracture models give almost identical results.
Date: November 9, 1995
Creator: Nitao, J.J. & Buscheck, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Suspending Insoluble Solids Waste Tanks with Shrouded Axial Impeller Mixers

Description: The Savannah River Site is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The authors are conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using shrouded axial impeller mixers. The authors will present and discuss the data generated during the tests.
Date: November 9, 1998
Creator: Poirier, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beyond the Brillouin limit with the Penning fusion experiment

Description: Several years ago, it was proposed that a dense nonneutral plasma could be produced in a Penning trap. Nonneutral plasmas have excellent confinement. Thus, such a dense plasma might produce simultaneously high density and good confinement (as needed for fusion). Recently, this theoretical conjecture has been demonstrated in a small (3 mm radius) electron experiment (PFX). Densities up to 35 times the Brillouin density (limiting number density in a static trap) have been inferred from the observed strong (100:1) spherical focussing. Electrons are injected at low energy from a single pole of the sphere. A surprising observation is the self-organization of the system into a spherical state, which occurs precisely when the trap parameters are adjusted to produce a spherical well. This organization is observed by a bootstrapping which produces a hysteresis. Additional observations which confirm the dense spherical focus are energy-scattered electrons and deflections of an electron probe beam by the space charge of the central focus.
Date: November 9, 1996
Creator: Barnes, D.C.; Mitchell, T.B. & Schauer, M.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct aromatization of methane. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

Description: Further investigations of the initiation of pyrolysis by a solid surface using a variety of catalysts with different surface areas and compositions were carried out during this reporting period. The effects of catalyst surface area, reaction temperature, and presence of ethane have been addressed. In general, catalysts such as {alpha}-A1{sub 2}O{sub 3},SiC, or hexaaluminates were found able to lower the reaction temperature but led to increased {open_quotes}tar{close_quotes} formation. The addition of ethane increased further the conversion at the higher temperatures and lowered the amount of {open_quotes}tar{close_quotes}. There appears to be no correlation between catalytic surface area and activity/selectivity for methane conversion.
Date: November 9, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Medicare Program Changes in H.R. 3962, Affordable Health Care for America Act

Description: This report describes changes to the Medicare program made in H.R. 3962, the Affordable Health Care for America Act, as passed by the House on November 7, 2009. H.R. 3962 contains numerous provisions affecting Medicare payments, payment rules, and covered benefits, and treats the Medicare program as both a funding source for health reform and a tool to shape future changes in the way that health services are delivered.
Date: November 9, 2009
Creator: Davis, Patricia A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Efficiency and throughput advances in continuous roll-to-roll a-Si alloy PV manufacturing technology: Annual technical progress report: 22 June 1998--21 June 1999

Description: This document reports on work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during Phase 1 of this subcontract. During this period, ECD researchers: (1) Completed design and construction of new, improved substrate heater; (2) Tested and verified improved performance of the new substrate heater in the pilot machine; (3) Verified improved performance of the new substrate heater in the production machine; (4) Designed and bench-tested a new infrared temperature sensor; (5) Installed a prototype new infrared temperature sensor in the production machine for evaluation; (6) Designed a new rolling thermocouple temperature sensor; (7) Designed and bench-tested a reflectometer for the backreflector deposition machine; (8) Designed and bench-tested in-line non-contacting cell diagnostic sensor and PV capacitive diagnostic system; (9) Installed the in-line cell diagnostic sensor in the 5-MW a-Si deposition machine for evaluation; (10) Demonstrated a new low-cost zinc metal process in the pilot back reflector machine; and (11) Fully tested a new cathode design for improved uniformity.
Date: November 9, 1999
Creator: Izu, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Process Development for CIGS Based Thin Film Photovoltaics Modules, Phase II Technical Report

Description: As a technology partner with NREL, Global Solar Energy (GSE) has initiated an extensive and systematic plan to accelerate the commercialization of thin-film photovoltaics (PV) based on copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). The distinguishing feature of the GSE manufacturing process is the exclusive use of lightweight, flexible substrates. GSE has developed the technology to fabricate CIGS photovoltaics on both stainless-steel and polymer substrates. CIGS deposited on flexible substrates can be fabricated into either flexible or rigid modules. Low-cost, rigid PV panels for remote power, bulk/utility, telecommunication, and rooftop applications have been produced by affixing the flexible substrate to an inexpensive rigid panel by lamination or adhesive. Stainless-steel-based PV modules are fabricated by a novel interconnect method that avoids the use of wires or foils and soldered connections. In the case of polymer-based PV modules, the continuous roll is not sectioned into individual panels until the module buss and power leads are attached. Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition has several advantages that translate directly to reduced capital costs, greater productivity, improved yield, greater reliability, lower maintenance, and a larger volume of PV material. In combination with roll-to-roll processing, GSE has developed evaporation deposition operations that enable low-cost and high-efficiency CIGS modules. The CIGS deposition process relies heavily on effusion source technology developed at GSE, and solving numerous problems was an integral part of the source development effort. Cell interconnection for thin-film CIGS modules on a polyimide substrate presents a considerable challenge.
Date: November 9, 2000
Creator: Britt, J.; Wiedeman, S. & Albright, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity Year End Report (Final Deliverable)

Description: The Southwest Center for Environmental Excellence and Opportunity (Southwest CEEO) has been in existence since October 1996 at Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute's (TVI) South Valley Campus. The Special Project was comprised of three objectives: (1) Increasing the number of Hispanics in careers related to the environment by improving education and job training opportunities; (2) Strengthening the infrastructure of Hispanic businesses and building their capacity to participate in environmental clean-up activities and potential technology commercialization; and (3) Increasing the Hispanic community's understanding of and participation in environmental protection through improved access to information and outreach activities, paying attention to cultural and linguistic issues. The Southwest CEEO has been successful in each of the above objective areas and continues to provide valuable services to TVI and the community. The Southwest CEEO has developed a scholarship/mentorship program involving business and industry, community organizations, and TVI faculty that will be replicated by other student mentorship programs. The Southwest CEEO has awarded approximately $50,000 over the two-year program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office. The Southwest CEEO has also developed a K-12 partnership with Albuquerque Public Schools (APS) to enhance environmental education for students and professional development for teachers. Incorporated into these student activities are experimental learning opportunities and curriculum development and/or enhancement. The Southwest CEEO has worked closely with the TVI Small Business Development Center (SBDC) to support Hispanic businesses in technology partnership activities. The Southwest CEEO in partnership the TVI SBDC has provided a large business forum and business workshops. In addition, the Southwest CEEO has developed a Technology Transfer Model that will be expanded in the future to a technology transfer guide to be used by New Mexico SBDC's. The Southwest CEEO has been active in the Albuquerque South Valley Community and Bernalillo County to promote more Hispanic ...
Date: November 9, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Observation of the spread of the readings in the Linac toroids and BPMs

Description: The readback accuracy on the high-energy toroids is about 0.26 mA. This does not consider, completely, the relative offsets among the toroids, just the accuracy of one reading on one toroid. Similarly, if you remove the way in which the beam moves in the beam pipe and ignore the relative offsets of the BPMs themselves, then the absolute accuracy of the reading on a BPM is 35 microns.
Date: November 9, 2001
Creator: McCrory, Elliott S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CARBON FLUXES IN A MANAGED PINE FOREST UNDER AMBIENT AND ELEVATED CO{sub 2}

Description: The primary objective of this study is to estimate CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub CO{sub 2}}) under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and varying environmental conditions. Additional objectives are to: (2) quantify canopy conductance and evaluate the hypothesis that canopy conductance will not be altered by elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} because reduction in leaf conductance is compensated by increased leaf area index, and (3) quantify the effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on aboveground production and apparent allocation of carbon below ground. In order to achieve the primary objective, the authors propose a modification to a methodology proposed earlier which emphasized leaf level measurements. These modifications stem from analysis of measurements performed in 1995--1996 that demonstrate (i) high variability in CO{sub 2} assimilation (A)--internal concentration (C{sub i} relations A-C{sub i} curves) in each level in the canopy for given photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and soil moisture content ({theta}) conditions, (ii) the relative independence of the ratio of C{sub i} to atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (C{sub i}/C{sub a}) from C{sub a} (different levels within canopy for a wide range of moisture content conditions), (iii) similarity in CO{sub 2} and water vapor flux co-spectra which permits estimation of CO{sub 2} conductances from water vapor conductances for canopy trees, and (iv) the good correlation (r=0.94) between scaled 15-tree stem flux measurements and eddy correlation water vapor flux on a daily time step.
Date: November 9, 1998
Creator: OREN,R.; KATUL,G.; SCHAFER,K. & HSIEH,C.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light Meson Physics from Charm Decays at Fermilab E791

Description: We present recent results on light mesons based on Dalitz plot analyses of charm decays from Fermilab experiment E791. Scalar mesons are found to have large contributions to the decays studied, D{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. From the K{pi}{pi} final state, we find good evidence for the existence of the light and broad k meson and we measure its mass and width. We also discuss recently published results on the 3{pi} final states, especially the measurement of the f{sub 0} parameters and the evidence for the {sigma} meson from D{sup +} {yields} {sigma}{pi}{sup +}. These results demonstrate the importance of charm decays as a new environment for the study of light meson physics.
Date: November 9, 2001
Creator: Gobel, Carla
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of Finite Element Predictions to Measurements from the Sandia Microslip Experiment

Description: When embarking on an experimental program for purposes of discovery and understanding, it is only prudent to use appropriate analysis tools to aid in the discovery process. Due to the limited scope of experimental measurement analytical results can significantly complement the data after a reasonable validation process has occurred. In this manner the analytical results can help to explain certain measurements, suggest other measurements to take and point to possible modifications to the experimental apparatus. For these reasons it was decided to create a detailed nonlinear finite element model of the Sandia Microslip Experiment. This experiment was designed to investigate energy dissipation due to microslip in bolted joints and to identify the critical parameters involved. In an attempt to limit the microslip to a single interface a complicated system of rollers and cables was devised to clamp the two slipping members together with a prescribed normal load without using a bolt. An oscillatory tangential load is supplied via a shaker. The finite element model includes the clamping device in addition to the sequence of steps taken in setting up the experiment. The interface is modeled using Coulomb friction requiring a modest validation procedure for estimating the coefficient of friction. Analysis results have indicated misalignment problems in the experimental procedure, identified transducer locations for more accurate measurements, predicted complex interface motions including the potential for galling, identified regions where microslip occurs and during which parts of the loading cycle it occurs, all this in addition to the energy dissipated per cycle. A number of these predictions have been experimentally corroborated in varying degrees and are presented in the paper along with the details of the finite element model.
Date: November 9, 2000
Creator: LOBITZ,DONALD W.; GREGORY,DANNY LYNN & SMALLWOOD,DAVID O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department