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Description: Haris XANTHOUDAKIS: 1 ... 789 It is the setting to music (of the "setting in rhythm", more precisely) of two Greek texts talking about the French revolution and illustrating two opposite aspects of its impact in Greece, still occupied by the Turks, of the end of the seventeenth century: a "Patriarchal letter" (sort of circular of the Patriarch of Constantinople, to read in the Orthodox churches), condemning the French who "practiced the fraticide, killed their king and lost their faith in God" (in this order) and, on the other hand, a poem by Antonios Martelaos (1754-1818), congratulating the French for having shed blood for the freedom of the people. The first text is played at the beginning and end of the song (phonetically reversed and in a normal voice, respectively). The other forms slowly, parallel to a rhythmic accompaniment, of "disco" nature. This double reconstitution will be done in steps of proportion 1: 2: 3: ...: 7: 8: 9. A portion of this proportion, namely 1: 7: 8: 9, serves to generate an interval pattern (semitone, fifth, sixth minor, sixth major) that appears in both its sequential and simultaneous forms. Repetitive music, "disco" music, serial music, for a piece that wants to celebrate a bicentennial, its contradictory way, while keeping its distance.
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Date: 1989
Creator: Xanthoudakēs, Charēs
Partner: UNT Music Library

1789 Libegal FRA

Description: Ivan PATACHICH: 1789 Libegal FRA The title of the play is a date, known throughout the world, and an acronym containing the first syllables of the three slogans of the French Revolution: FREEDOM, EQUALITY, FRAternity. The sound materials of the play are those three words spoken and sung in nine languages, French, English, Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, German, Erithrenic, Russian, Hungarian, and the sampled structures of the vowels and consonants of these notes in nine languages, as well as two concrete sounds. These sounds are interlaced by a pre-recorded and modulated percussion part and another one of percussion "alive" / live / without modulation. The work has nine parts "atacca". Its bridge shape is phrased by rhythmic contrasts. After the fifth section, the sections return "in crayfish", but in a varied form. The stereophonic work was realized with the collaboration of Istvan Horvath, sound engineer, Gabor Kosa, impact, Agnés Mester, -soprano, Gabor Olah, -Baryton.
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Date: 1989
Creator: Patachich, Iván
Partner: UNT Music Library

[Adam Nussbaum Lecture, February 28, 1989: Part 3]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Adam Nussbaum on February 28, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Adam Nussbaum, drums, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: February 28, 1989
Creator: Nussbaum, Adam
Partner: UNT Music Library

[Adam Nussbaum Lecture, February 28, 1989: Parts 1 and 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Adam Nussbaum on February 28, 1989 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Adam Nussbaum, drums, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: February 28, 1989
Creator: Nussbaum, Adam
Partner: UNT Music Library

Anaconda

Description: "Anaconda" could be labelled as a "naturalistic" work. Conceptually, the piece relies on the imagery provoked by the sound, and on the immediacy of the sound world and the integration of the flute part in terms of sound texture and musical material. Broadly, this work can be divided in three parts: 1) The very beginning represents the location : jungle, unfamiliar, exotic, moist, exuberant and very importantly, claustrophobic ( this last is maintained throughout the piece). It is here that we get our first glimpse of the anaconda, who, very soon embarks with his song, which is not unlike a requiem, but at times, this song or narrative, is interrupted by the sound of the anaconda itself and by its environment. It is very much like moving between 1st and 2nd person. 2) The environment is disrupted. Foreign sounds and activities invade our location. The jungle moves, everything is in motion, fear and flight take over. But, suddenly, we realize that there is a certain gracefulness in all this motion, that the flight is but a retreat, a withdrawal into itself, nature and eternal life, with the certainty of a return. 3) The rebirth. Like the Phoenix, the Anaconda is reborn, as myth, and as the reality of wisdom. A reflective and poised character, strengthened by the experience, the Anaconda reasserts itself, its place in relation to the environment, and its place in relation to us, the spectators, and at times participants of its story.
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Date: 1989/1990
Creator: Rosas Cobian, Michael, 1953-
Partner: UNT Music Library

Ce que Signifie la Déclaration des Droits de l'Homme et du Citoyens de 1789 pour les Hommes et les Citoyens des "Les Marquises"

Description: 17 articles of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen extracted from the French Constitution of 1789 are read by a 100-year-old woman who was born in France and grew up on the island of Nuku Hiva in the "Marquesas Islands" . The sound materials of the piece were recorded there in December 1988. The work is dedicated to the village of Anaho.
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Date: 1989
Creator: Appleton, Jon H., 1939-
Partner: UNT Music Library

Concertino

Description: The last few years have witnessed the appearance of highly-specialized fast microcomputers capable of synthesizing complicated spectra in real time. The establishing of MIDI communication protocol provided a precise and efficient way of controlling them by means of such devices – familiar to every musician – as keyboard, violin or drum. Implementing high level language compilers in micro-computers created the possibility of using them for generating non-trivial streams of MIDI signals, significantly enhancing the performing capabilities of humans. And since everything is happening in real time the performance nuances of pitch, dynamics and tempi of the piece can be controlled during the playing. It seems that this new technology will allow to overcome the rigidness of tape – an ultimate form of musical recording. All electronic sounds used in Concertino are generated by two Yamaha TX816 digital synthesizers. MIDI signals are produced by a Yamaha KX88 keyboard and a MacIntosh computer. The program collaboration in controlling the synthesizers was written in LeLisp at IRCAM, in the early months of 1987. France is also responsible for the Dorian flavor of the piece since all the music was derived from L'Homme arme – a fifteenth-century French song. The saxophone part is written out freely, allowing a performer much freedom for shaping the content of his part. The piece was completed in Stanford, in June 1987.
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Date: 1989
Creator: Krupowicz, Stanisław, 1952-
Partner: UNT Music Library

La couleur tombe, l'homme reste

Description: "There is oppression against the social body when one of its members is oppressed, there is oppression against each member when the social body is oppressed". (The Declaration of Human Rights and Citizen 1793). Order of the GMEB, "The Color" is composed by Marilyn Boyd DeReggi specifically for the courtyard of the Palais Jacques Coeur. The work commemorates the emancipation of the exclaves in the French colonies in 1793, almost a hundred years before slavery was finally abolished in the United States. The title is derived from the last line of a popular song of the revolutionary period that frames the play. The other musical materials were taken from the Gospel music of the "Jerusalem Baptist" church, a small black parish in the Maryland countryside. The music was recorded on Palm Sunday. "Free at Last," sung by Carlton Talley was an emancipation song first heard in Virginia the day after the liberation of slaves, now sung as a Gospel anthem Mr. Talley officiates at church and sings Gospels in the churches, the prisons and the Old Men's Centers (!), since the age of eight when he started singing in a quartet with his father and two brothers. He was chosen as a soloist not only for the beauty of his voice but also because he symbolizes for the composer purity of soul. We shudder to think that the grandparents of most of the people of this parish were slaves. The percussion instruments of the first part were created by imitating the beatings of the feet and the hands of the people of the church with the kalimba and the marimba. The vocal duet is actually only Mr. Talley's voice. The multi-media aspects were developed in collaboration with Mark Gaster, Gayle Behrman, Renee Butler, Mary Koong and Doug Quin. The composer ...
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Date: 1989
Creator: DeReggi, Marilyn Boyd
Partner: UNT Music Library