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Optical Calcite Deposits of the Republic of Mexico

Description: From abstract: Many small deposits of optical calcite (Iceland spar) were discovered in the States of Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, and Sinaloa from early in 1942 to late in 1944. Exploration that began in Sonora led to the discovery of commercial deposits in the eastern part of that State, and subsequently other deposits were found and mined in southwestern and northeastern Chihuahua and in western and central Durango. The largest deposits can be reached by foot or by horse in from 1 to 3 hours from the nearest truck roads, but some of the small deposits are 1 to 3 days by horse from the nearest roads.
Date: 1948
Creator: Fries, Carl, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adsorbent Clays: Their Distribution, Properties, Production, and Uses

Description: From Abstract: "This bulletin is a summary of present knowledge of the adsorbent or bleaching clays-their distribution, field and laboratory identification, physical and chemical properties, uses, quality, and value. Problems in the drying, treating with acids, and washing are discussed, and methods of testing and rating decolorizing efficiency are described."
Date: 1943
Creator: Nutting, P. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mineral Industry of Alaska in 1939

Description: From Introduction: "The presentation of a yearly record of the Alaska mineral industry is a continuing service that has been rendered by the Geological Survey from almost the earliest years of extensive mining in Alaska, and the present report for 1939, is the thirty-sixth of this series.These reports therefore serve miners, prospectors, and businessmen concerned with Alaska affairs as useful historical records, statements of contemporary conditions, and starting points on which some conjectures concerning future operations may be predicated."
Date: 1941
Creator: Smith, Philip S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of Area Between Green and Colorado Rivers, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah

Description: From Abstract: "The area described in this report comprises about 900 square miles of arid land lying between the Green and Colorado Rivers south of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad and southwest of the Salt Valley anticline. The rocks that crop out or that have been encountered in wells drilled in the are all sedimentary and range in age from Pennsylvania ti Upper Cretaceous. Mesizoic strata are especially well represented."
Date: 1940
Creator: McKnight, Edwin Thor
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stratigraphy, Structure, and Mineralization in the Beaver-Tarryall Area, Park County, Colorado: A Reconnaissance Report

Description: From Introduction: "The recent large increase in gold production from the Alma district has greatly stimulated interest in territory immediately to the east, where many small gold-bearing veins have been discovered. Consequently, as a cooperative project of the United States Geological Survey and the State of Colorado, 7 weeks in 1938 were devoted to renaissance work to determine the origin of the placer gold and the possibilities for discovering valuable lode deposits either near the surface or at depth."
Date: 1942
Creator: Singewald, Quentin D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chromite deposits of Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

Description: This report describes field work and research done in two areas of ultramafic rocks containing chromite deposits are known at the south end of Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. The Red Mountain is the other area covered in this report.
Date: 1942
Creator: Guild, Philip White
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Manganese Deposits of Mexico

Description: From abstract: Manganese has been reported from 335 deposits in 20 of the 30 States and Territories of Mexico. The production of manganese ore prior to 1942, according to published figures, amounted to about 54,000 tons. For the year 1942 production rose to 35,000 tons, for 1943 to 70,503 tons, and for 1944 to 80,671 tons; but for 1945 it dropped to a little less than 52,000 tons, and during 1946 it continued to drop. Up to the end of 1941 Chihuahua had produced about half the manganese ore from Mexico; San Luis Potosi produced about 17 percent, and Baja California and Zacatecas each about 10 percent. In 1942 Baja California became the chief producer; Durango, Chihuahua, and Zacatecas each yielded somewhat less. During that year the ore came from 76 deposits, of which only 30 yielded more than 500 tons each.
Date: 1948
Creator: Trask, Parker D. & Cabo, José RodrÍguez, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscovite in the Spruce Pine District, North Carolina

Description: From Abstract: "This report describes the occurrence of the mica and its physical properties among which is an unusually wide range of colors. A table is presented showing the results of power-factor measurements made by the National Bureau of Standards on 196 samples of sheet mica from 109 mica mines and 15 feldspar mines.It is concluded that more systematic planning of mica mining, for the district as a whole. would result in an average yearly production of at least 90,000 pounds of relatively clear sheet and possibly much more."
Date: 1942
Creator: Kesler, Thomas L. (Thomas Lingle), 1908-1997 & Olson, J. C. (Jerry Chipman), 1917-2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nickel-gold deposit near Mount Vernon, Skagit County, Washington

Description: From Introduction: "The Mount Vernon nickel-gold deposit is 4 1/2 miles southeast of the city of Mount Vernon, Skagit County, Wash. The writers believe that the nickel was originally present in the serpentinized peridotite and that it was dissolved and redistributed by ascending hydrothermal gold-bearing solutions while the serpentine was being altered into the silica-carbonate rock."
Date: 1941
Creator: Hobbs, S. W. & Pecora, W. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia

Description: From preface: The manuscript of this report, which is the culmination of field and office studies carried on intermittently s' ice 1914, partly in cooperation with the Geological Survey of Georgia, was completed early in 1938. It was prepared with the expectation that it would form part of a more comprehensive report on the geology of Georgia by several authors, which was intended to accompany a geologic map of the entire State on a scale of 1: 500,000. However, this map without the text was published in 1939 by the Georgia Division of Mines, Mining and Geology. Part of this map is reproduced herein as plate 1 without revision.
Date: 1943
Creator: Cooke, C. Wythe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tungsten Investigations in the Republic of Argentina, 1942-43

Description: From foreword: This is a progress report describing four tungsten mines in the Republic of Argentina that were examined between October 1942 and May 1943. The work leading to this report was carried on by the Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior, and Direcci6n de Minas y Geologia, Ministerio de Agricultura de la Republica Argentina. This work was part of a larger cooperative program sponsored by the Interdepartmental Committee on Scientific and Cultural Cooperation and was carried on under the auspices of the United States Department of State. It is hoped that this cooperative work will be continued, for it is not only of direct practical use to miners but of high scientific interest.
Date: 1947
Creator: Smith, Ward C. & González, E. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geologic Structure and Occurrence of Gas in Part of Southwestern New York: Part 2. Subsurface Structure in Part of Southwestern New York and Mode of Occurrence of Gas in the Medina Group

Description: Abstract: Based on the records of several hundred deep wells, contour maps have been prepared showing the monoclinal structure of part of western New York, and isopach lines have been drawn showing the westward convergence of the rocks. The mode of occurrence of natural gas in the Medina group is briefly discussed. The location of the gas fields has not been determined by structural traps, but rather stratigraphy and lithology are the controlling factors in trapping the gas, which occurs in porous lenses and streaks of sandstone sealed within impermeable beds. This mode of occurrences of the Medina gas makes the search for new fields in western New York more hazardous than in most natural gas regions. As structure has not formed traps for the gas there is no surface guide to favorable sites for testing, and new fields are found by haphazard drilling. It would be helpful, however, when wells are sunk, to study the lithology of the gas-bearing zone by an examination of the drill cuttings and core samples of the sand and to have electrical logs made of the wells to obtain measurements of permeability and porosity. Such tests may indicate the direction of greatest porosity in which the sand is more likely to contain gas.
Date: 1941
Creator: Richardson, G. B. (George Burr)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tungsten Resources of the Blue Wing District, Lemhi County Idaho

Description: From abstract: The Blue Wing district, Lemhi County, Idaho, is not only the principal tungsten mining district in the State but it has recently become one of the leading producers of tungsten in the United States. So far only one mine in the district is productive, but other prospects are being actively developed.
Date: 1941
Creator: Callaghan, Eugene & Lemmon, Dwight M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vanadium Deposits of Colorado and Utah: a Preliminary Report

Description: From abstract: Deposits of vanadium-bearing sandstone are widely distributed in western Colorado and eastern Utah and have been the principal domestic source of vanadium, uranium, and radium. Except during a few years when operations were relatively small, deposits at one or more places in this region have been intensively mined since 1909. Production has increased considerably each year since 1937.
Date: 1942
Creator: Fischer, Richard P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Wild Horse Quicksilver District Lander County, Nevada

Description: Abstract: The presence of cinnabar in the Wild Horse district, in western Lander County, Nev., has been known since about 1916, but little ore was produced until 1940. In that year and early in 1941, deposits discovered in 1939 were mined to apparent exhaustion by the Wild Horse Quicksilver Mining Co., which had produced 827 flasks at the end of April 1941. The district is underlain by moderately deformed sandstone, shale, and limestone of Lower and Middle Triassic age, locally covered by remnants of a mantle of Tertiary fanglomerate, tuff, and lava. The Triassic rocks are partly silicified, and cinnabar has been found in and near silicified rock, particularly the silicified limestone at the base of -the Middle Triassic. The ore bodies so far discovered were individually small and ill-defined, and had an average tenor of less than 0.5 percent of quicksilver. Other similar ore bodies are to be expected at moderate depths, but the cost of exploration for them may, perhaps, prove excessive.
Date: 1942
Creator: Dane, Carle H. & Ross, Clyde P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tin Deposits of Irish Creek, Virginia

Description: From abstract: Cassiterite was discovered along Irish Creek in the Blue Ridge in the northern part of Rockbridge County, Va., in 1846, but active prospecting and development work were not begun until 1884. The production has been small, probably less than 1,000 tons of ore, and has come chiefly from workings on Panther Run, a small tributary near the headwaters of Irish Creek.
Date: 1942
Creator: Koschmann, A. H.; Glass, J. J. & Vhay, J. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tin Deposits of Northern Lander County, Nevada

Description: From abstract: Tin-bearing veinlets are exposed in a small area near Izenhood Ranch, 22 miles north of Battle Mountain, Nev. They occur in thick rhyolitic flows of Miocene (?) age, and wood tin, found in the gravels of arroyos that head in the surrounding rhyolite, presumably comes from -other veinlets not yet discovered. The exposed veinlets are about 20 feet in maximum length and a quarter of an inch in average thickness. Parallel and reticulating veinlets form lodes 4 to 6 feet thick and 15 or 20 feet long. Virtually no cassiterite is disseminated in the wall rock.
Date: 1942
Creator: Fries, Carl, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tin Deposit at Majuba Hill Pershing County, Nevada

Description: Abstract: The tin and copper deposits at Majuba Hill, Pershing County, Nevada are in a partly brecciated plug of Tertiary rhyolite porphyry, which is altered nearly everywhere to quartz and sericite and in some places is intensely tourmalinized. The tin mineral, cassiterite, appears to be associated with the alteration, for the single concentration of it was formed by replacement of altered breccia. Brecciated and altered rock is, however, only a general guide to potentially tin-bearing ground, and not a specific guide to ore shoots, for most of such rock appears to contain only small amounts of cassiterite, widely and unevenly distributed. The known deposit, which is exposed only underground, is at most 20 by 20 by 10 feet in size, and may contain about 12,000 pounds of metallic tin. The deposit is cut off by a normal fault, which apparently is of small displacement, and the footwall segment has not been found. The copper deposit is in the same normal fault, about 300 feet south of the earlier-formed tin deposit. From it about 4,000 tons of 12 percent copper ore was mined in 1915-18, but none has been mined since and no copper ore is now in sight.
Date: 1942
Creator: Smith, Ward C. & Gianella, V. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tungsten Deposits of the Nightingale District, Pershing County, Nevada

Description: Abstract: The tungsten deposits of the Nightingale district are just within the western border of Pershing County, Nev., and in the Nightingale or Truckee Range, which lies east of Winnemucca Lake. The Tertiary volcanic rocks of the district rest unconformably upon intrusive granodiorite and steeply dipping metamorphosed limestones and slates of unknown age. The tungsten deposits are of the contact-metamorphic type: The ore consists of scheelite bearing tactite, a dark silicate rock that was formed by metamorphism of limestone at the granodiorite contact. Scheelite (calcium tungstate) is the only valuable mineral. The gangue minerals are epidote, quartz, pyroxene, garnet, calcite, tremolite, molybdenite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, apatite, and sphene. The bodies of tactite are generally tabular, and they extend downward steeply, because both the limestones and the granodiorite contact dip vertically or nearly so. The largest tactite body of the district is at the Nightingale mine; it attains a maximum thickness of 60 feet and is nearly a thousand feet long, but only for part of its length is it thick enough and rich enough to be potentially minable. That it continues downward below the mine workings, which extend to a depth of 128 feet, is shown by nine drill holes put down by the Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, in 1940, all of which encountered tactite at depths of, 260 to 350 feet. The mine has produced about 12,000 tons of ore, and its ore bodies contain the principal reserve of the district. In 1938 the reserves of the entire district were estimated to be about 50,000 tons of ore averaging between 0.25 and 0.50 percent of W03. Later diamond drilling by the Bureau of Mines indicated that the principal tactite body continues to at least twice the depth hitherto explored by the mine workings.
Date: 1942
Creator: Smith, Ward C. & Guild, Philip White
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Tin-Spodumene Belt of the Carolinas: a Preliminary Report

Description: From abstract: Cassiterite and spodumene, of possible economic importance, occur in a belt, 24.5 miles long and 1.8 miles in maximum width, extending southwestward from Lincolnton to Grover, N. C. This belt is in the Piedmont province, an upland with an average altitude of 1,000 feet, and is readily accessible by rail and highway. The region is underlain by crystalline limestone, quartzite, schists, gneisses, and granite. The rocks strike northeast and, in most of the belt, dip steeply northwest. Most of them are deeply weathered.
Date: 1942
Creator: Kesler, Thomas L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Topaz Deposits Near the Brewer Mine, Chesterfield County, South Carolina

Description: From introduction: Lode and placer deposits of massive topaz rock were discovered near the old Brewer gold mine in northwestern Chesterfield County, S. C., in 1935. Preliminary tests have shown that this rock can be used in the manufacture of refractory ware and as a source of mullite, thus augmenting supplies of kyanite that have been coming from India.
Date: 1942
Creator: Fries, Carl, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tungsten Deposits in the Sierra Nevada Near Bishop, California: A Preliminary Report

Description: From abstract: Scheelite ore bodies occur at widely separated localities in the Sierra Nevada near Bishop, Calif. The scheelite is found in altered sedimentary rocks at or near the contact between granitic rocks and limestones that are partly changed to silicate rocks composed largely of garnet. Mineralization was closely connected with the intrusion of the granite, the latest of the varied intrusives that make up the rocks of the Sierra Nevada.
Date: 1941
Creator: Lemmon, Dwight M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department