Search Results

Magnetomorphic Oscillations in Zinc

Description: In making this study it is important to search for ways to enhance and, if possible, make detection of MMO signals simpler in order that this technique for obtaining FS measurements may be extended to other materials. This attempt to improve measurement techniques has resulted in a significant discovery: the eddy-current techniques described in detail in a later section which should allow MMO to be observed and sensitively measured in many additional solids. The second major thrust of the study has been to use the newly discovered eddy-current technique in obtaining the first indisputable observation of MMO in zinc.
Date: August 1970
Creator: Waller, William Marvin
Partner: UNT Libraries

L-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections for ₂₀Ca, ₂₆Fe, ₂₈Ni, ₂₉Cu, ₃₀Zn, ₃₁Ga, and ₃₂Ge by Hydrogen, Helium, and Lithium Ions

Description: L-shell x-ray production cross sections are presented for Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, and Ge by 0.5- to 5.0-MeV protons and by 0.5- to 8.0-MeV helium ions and Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ge by 0.75- to 4.5-MeV lithium ions. These measurements are compared to the first Born theory and the perturbed-stationary- state theory with energy-loss, Coulomb deflection, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR). The results are also compared to previous experimental investigations. The high precision x-ray measurements were performed with a windowless Si(Li) detector. The efficiency of the detector was determined by the use of thin target atomic-field bremsstrahlung produced by 66.5 keV electrons. The measured bremsstrahlung spectra were compared to theoretical bremsstrahlung distributions in order to obtain an efficiency versus energy curve. The targets for the measurement were manufactured by the vacuum evaporation of the target element onto thin foils of carbon. Impurities in the carbon caused interferences inthe L-shell x-ray peaks. Special cleansing procedures were developed that reduced the impurity concentrations in the carbon foil, making the use of less than 5 μg/cm^2 targets possible. The first Born theory is seen to greatly overpredict the data at low ion energies. The ECPSSR theory matches the data very well at the high energy region. At low energies, while fitting the data much more closely than the first Born theory, the ECPSSR theory does not accurately predict the trend of the data. This is probably due to the onset of molecular-orbital effects, a mechanism not accounted for in the ECPSSR theory.
Date: May 1992
Creator: McNeir, Michael Ridge
Partner: UNT Libraries

Hit 'em with Copper, Zinc, Lead

Description: Black and white cartoon of Uncle Sam and a miner. Miner: "Gosh, I would like to take a crack at those Japs!" Uncle Sam: "You're doin' it every day - with every ton of ore you mine to make tanks, planes and guns"
Date: 1942
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Charge State Dependence of L-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections of ₂₈Ni, ₂₉Cu, ₃₀Zn, ₃₁Ga, and ₃₂Ge by Energetic Oxygen Ions

Description: Charge state dependence of L-shell x-ray production cross sections have been measured for 4-14 MeV ¹⁶O^q (q=3⁺-8⁺) ions incident on ultra-clean, ultra-thin copper, and for 12 MeV ¹⁶O^q (q=3⁺-8⁺) on nickel, zinc, gallium and germanium solid foils. L-shell x-ray production cross section were measured using target foils of thickness ≤0.6 μg/cm² evaporated onto 5 μg/cm² carbon backings. Oxygen ions at MeV energies and charge state q were produced using a 3MV 9SDH-2 National Electrostatics Corporation tandem Pelletron accelerator. Different charge states, with and without K-vacancies, were produced using a post acceleration nitrogen striping gas cell or ¹²C stripping foils. L-shell x-rays from ultra-thin ₂₈Ni, ₂₉Cu,₃₀Zn,₃₁Ga, and ₃₂Ge targets were measured using a Si(Li) x-ray detector with a FWHM resolution of 135 eV at 5.9 keV. The scattered projectiles were detected simultaneously by means of silicon surface barrier detectors at angle of 45° and 169° with respect to the beam direction. The electron capture (EC) as well as direct ionization (DI) contributions were determined from the projectile charge state dependence of the target x-ray production cross sections under single collision conditions. The present work was undertaken to expand the measurements of L-shell x-ray production cross sections upon selected elements with low L-shell binding energies by energetic ¹⁶O^q (q=3⁺,4⁺,5⁺,6⁺,7⁺,8⁺) incident ions. Collision systems chosen for this work have sufficiently large Z₁/Z₂ ratios (0.25-0.28) so that EC may noticeably contribute to the x-ray production enhancement. In this region, reliable experimental data are particularly scarce, thus, fundamental work in this area is still necessary. DI and EC cross section measurements were compared with the ECPSSR and the first Born theories over the range of 0.25 <Z₁/Z₂ < 0.29 and 0.38 < v₁/v₂_L <0.72. The ECPSSR theoretical predictions (including DI and EC) are in closer agreement with the data than the first Born's.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Azordegan, Amir R. (Amir Reza)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Predicting the Site-Specific Bioavailability of Zinc Using the Indicator Species Procedure: A Case Study

Description: National Water Quality Criteria intended to protect aquatic life and their uses from the adverse effects of pollutants may not be appropriate due to site-specific factors that alter chemical bioavailability. The Indicator Species Procedure may be used to derive site-specific criteria in order to account for differences in site-specific bioavailability. This procedure was implemented using zinc for three chemically different site (river) waters. The purpose of this study was to quantify the bioavailability of zinc in each site water and correlate results to water quality parameters and/or zinc speciation. Results demonstrated that national criteria for zinc accurately predicted the experimentally derived site-specific values within a factor of two when adjusted for water hardness. Particulate forms of zinc were shown to be biologically unavailable under conditions tested.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Parkerton, Thomas F.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Here's why we need more metal to win this war.

Description: Poster features a series of six black & white photographs on a black background. The photographs are of military weapons, vehicles, aircraft, and a ship. Each photograph has a caption describing the amount of copper, zinc, and lead used to manufacture the equipment shown.
Date: 1942
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Zinc Toxicity Using Neuronal Networks on Microelectrode Arrays: Response Quantification and Entry Pathway Analysis

Description: Murine neuronal networks, derived from embryonic frontal cortex (FC) tissue grown on microelectrode arrays, were used to investigate zinc toxicity at concentrations ranging from 20 to 2000 mM total zinc acetate added to the culture medium. Continual multi-channel recording of spontaneous action potential generation allowed a quantitative analysis of the temporal evolution of network spike activity generation at specific zinc acetate concentrations. Cultures responded with immediate concentration-dependent excitation lasting from 5 to 50 min, consisting of increased spiking and enhanced, coordinated bursting. This was followed by irreversible activity decay. The time to 50% and 90% activity loss was concentration dependent, highly reproducible, and formed linear functions in log-log plots. Network activity loss generally preceded morphological changes. 20% cell swelling was correlated with 50% activity loss. Cultures pretreated with the GABAA receptor antagonists bicuculline (40 mM) and picrotoxin (1 mM) lacked the initial excitation phase. This suggests that zinc-induced excitation may be mediated by interfering with GABA inhibition. Partial network protection was achieved by stopping spontaneous activity with either tetrodotoxin (200 nM) or lidocaine (250 mM). However, recovery was not complete and slow deterioration of network activity continued over 6 hrs. Removal of zinc by early medium changes showed irreversible, catastrophic network failure to develop in a concentration-dependent time window between 50% and 90% activity loss. Investigation of entry routes suggested the L-type but not N-type calcium channels to be the main entry pathway for zinc. Data are presented implicating the chloride channel to be an additional entry route.
Date: August 2007
Creator: Parviz, Maryam
Partner: UNT Libraries

Recovery of Zinc from Low-Grade and Complex Ores

Description: From Introduction: "Vocalization in retorts has been, until recently, the only commercial process of producing spelter, hence the zinc mine operators have had to meet the terms of the zinc mine operators have had to meet the terms of the zinc smelters in regard to the following requirements: (1) Minimum percentage of zinc the ore must contain; (2) the chemical combination of the zinc in the ore; (3) the proportion present of those elements that interfere with the successful recovery of the zinc when the ore is retorted. As stated previously, and as will be shown later, a large part of the valuable mineral content of the ore is lost in effecting this concentration. As a result of the other requirements that have to be met in zinc smelting, much zinc is lost in the mining and milling of zinc ore."
Date: 1919
Creator: Lyon, Dorsey A. & Ralston, Oliver C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department