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The State of the Hudson 2009

Description: This report describes the environmental quality of the Hudson River and its watershed, including issues such as pollution, population growth, and biodiversity. The report also describes the habitats of estuaries, watersheds, and rivers in general.
Date: 2009
Creator: New York (State). Hudson River Estuary Program.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Water Pollution: Proposed Pretreatment Standards for Industrial Laundries

Description: Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO reviewed the dispute between the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the industrial laundry industry regarding EPA's cost benefit analyses of its proposed pretreatment standards, focusing on: (1) EPA's implementation of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA); (2) the significant differences between EPA's and the industry's cost estimates of this proposed regulation; (3) ascertaining how EPA estimated the benefits of the proposed rule and disclosed the uncertainties associated with the accuracy of its estimates; and (4) how EPA's analysis supports its belief that the agency has chosen the least costly, most cost-effective, or least burdensome regulatory alternative."
Date: January 20, 1999
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Concentrations of Triclosan in the City of Denton Wastewater Treatment Plant, Pecan Creek, and the Influent and Effluent of an Experimental Constructed Wetland

Description: The Pecan Creek Waste Reclamation Plant in Denton, Texas, an activated sludge WWTP, was sampled monthly for ten months to determine seasonal and site variation in concentrations of triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol), an antibacterial additive. SNK separation after the highly significant ANOVA on ranked data were: summer = fall > winter = spring and influent > downstream = effluent = wetland inflow > wetland outflow (a=0.05). After the plant converted to ultraviolet disinfection, measurements were made before and after the UV basin to determine if significant amounts of triclosan were converted to dioxin. Percent loss at each of the treatment steps was determined. Concentrations of triclosan in the downstream site were below the published NOEC for the most sensitive species.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Waltman, Elise Lyn
Partner: UNT Libraries

Law of the People's Republic of China on Prevention and Control of Water Pollution

Description: This Law is formulated for the purpose of preventing and controlling water pollution, protecting and improving the environment, safeguarding human health, ensuring the effective use of water resources and facilitating the development of socialist modernization.
Date: May 11, 1984
Creator: Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, P.R. China
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Federal Water Pollution Control Act

Description: The Clean Water Act (CWA) establishes the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into the waters of the United States and regulating quality standards for surface waters. The basis of the CWA was enacted in 1948 and was called the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, but the Act was significantly reorganized and expanded in 1972. "Clean Water Act" became the Act's common name with amendments in 1977. Under the CWA, EPA has implemented pollution control programs such as setting wastewater standards for industry. We have also set water quality standards for all contaminants in surface waters. The CWA made it unlawful to discharge any pollutant from a point source into navigable waters, unless a permit was obtained. EPA's National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program controls discharges. Point sources are discrete conveyances such as pipes or man-made ditches. Individual homes that are connected to a municipal system, use a septic system, or do not have a surface discharge do not need an NPDES permit; however, industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.
Date: November 27, 2002
Creator: United States. Congress. House
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Clearing the Waters: A focus on water quality solutions

Description: This report discusses global water issues and offers a variety of proposals for countering the degradation of freshwater ecosystems for the benefit of public health and the environment.
Date: March 2010
Creator: Palanaippan, Meena; Gleick, Peter H.; Allen, Lucy; Cohen, Michael J.; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Smith, Courtney et al.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries

Water Pollution: EPA Has Improved Its Review of Effluent Guidelines but Could Benefit from More Information on Treatment Technologies

Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses a two-phase process to identify industrial categories potentially needing new or revised effluent guidelines to help reduce their pollutant discharges. EPA’s 2002 draft Strategy for National Clean Water Industrial Regulations was the foundation for EPA’s process. In the first, or “screening,” phase, EPA uses data from two EPA databases to rank industrial categories according to the total toxicity of their wastewater. Using this ranking, public comments, and other considerations, EPA has identified relatively few industrial categories posing the highest hazard for the next, or “further review,” phase. In this further review phase, EPA evaluates the categories to identify those that are appropriate for new or revised guidelines because treatment technologies are available to reduce pollutant discharges. Since 2003, EPA has regularly screened the 58 categories for which it has issued effluent guidelines, as well as some potential new industrial categories, and it has identified 12 categories for its further review phase. Of these 12 categories, EPA selected 3 for updated or new effluent guidelines. EPA chose not to set new guidelines for the others."
Date: September 10, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Item Type: Report
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How Healthy is the Upper Trinity River?: Biological and Water Quality Perspectives

Description: This conference report contains discussions and papers from a symposium hosted at Texas Christian University, in Fort Worth, Texas, examining the ecological health of the Upper Trinity River, and the impacts of various human activity, such as agriculture, urbanization, and waste management. The papers cover the effect of water quality on urban rivers, long-term water quality trends in the Trinity River, solutions that may improve water quality in the river, as well as biological, agricultural and waste-water issues.
Date: 1990
Creator: Jensen, Ric
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Libraries

Temporal and Spatial Comparisons of Ambient Toxicity of the Trinity River in Relationship to an Effluent

Description: A toxicological study was initiated because of concerns about allegations that the Texas Water Commission that effluent from the Dallas Central Wastewater Treatment Plant, which discharges into the Trinity River, was affecting downstream water quality. Monthly, flow-weighted composite effluent samples were collected. Grab samples were also collected upstream and downstream from the effluent from April 1989 to August 1991. Toxicity tests were conducted on these samples using Ceriodaphnia dubia as the test organism. Samples were collected four times during this study in which rainfall occurred prior to sampling. In every instance, this "first flush" of the watershed during a rising hydrograph was toxic to C. dubia upstream. Analyzing toxicity by season resulted in a statistically significantly lower neonate production in the effluent than in the river samples during the months of June, July, and August. This impact on neonate production was suspected of being caused by organic pesticides which are used for insect control on lawns. The effluent was never acutely toxic to C. dubia. Primarily, toxic occurrences in either the effluent or the river samples were primarily of a chronic nature. Overall, survival of C. dubia was affected more frequently at the upstream site than in the effluent or the downstream site. Because EPA's Phase I Acute Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs) methods were designed for identifying acute toxicity, two alternative strategies were attempted to identify chronic toxicity. The first attempt was the modification of the phase I acute TIE methodologies. This was done by processing more sample through the phase I characterization tests. This approach was inadequate due to toxicity that occurred during the last several days of the seven-day C. dubia reproduction test. The second strategy for identifying chronic toxicity within a TIE involved the use of freeze concentration. During this preliminary investigation ofthe efficiency of freeze concentration, ...
Date: December 1993
Creator: Hall, David B., 1958-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Quantitative Analysis of Water and Biological Samples for Determination of Haleogenated Organics in the Upper Trinity River, Texas : Final Technical Report

Description: This study had three objectives: 1) to develop a method for the quantitative determination of total organic bound chlorine in water and biological samples using Source-Excited X-Ray Fluorescence, 2) to provide training in the use of analytical techniques for students from different disciplines, and 3) to use an interdisciplinary approach involving students of biology, chemistry, and physics to investigate a complex environmental problem. Only the first objective is treated in detail in this volume.
Date: 1976
Creator: Johnson, David E.
Item Type: Book
Partner: UNT Institute of Applied Sciences

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 4

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Pure Water, Loss of Soil Fertility, Availability of Fertilizers, Seed Selection, Jerusalem Artichokes, Kafir Corn, Thinning Fruit, Use of Low-Grade Apples, Cooking Vegetables, Condimental Feeding Stuffs, Steer and Heifer Beef, Swells in Canned Vegetables.
Date: 1898
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Item Type: Pamphlet
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Investigation of Naturally Occurring Tastes and Odors from Fresh Waters

Description: The Problem of the cause and control of tastes and odors in water supplies has been the subject of a great many investigations during the last half-century; however, many questions in this field remain to be answered. Theories relating to the cause of tastes and odors occurring in water are still rather numerous and, at present, only a few of them are compatible. Although several procedures have been employed for the eradication of tastes and odors from water supplies, none of them are completely successful.
Date: May 1955
Creator: Pipes, Wesley O'Feral, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparative Chemistry of Thermally Stressed North Lake and Its Water Source, Elm Fork Trinity River

Description: To better understand abiotic dynamics in Southern reservoirs receiving heated effluents, water was analyzed before and after impoundment in 330 ha North Lake. Macronutrients, metals, and chlorinated hydrocarbons were measured. Concentrations of nutrients and metals in sediments were quantified in this 2 yr study. River water prior to impoundment contained 16 times more total phosphorus, and supported 23 times more Selenastrum capricornutum cells in an algal assay than reservoir water. The reservoir has essentially no drainage and since evaporation is high, the concentrations of many dissolved solids have increased since the reservoir was filled in 1958. North Lake is now phosphorus limited. Apparently altered chemical equilibria have caused precipitation or adsorption of phosphorus with calcium and iron.
Date: December 1976
Creator: Sams, Barry L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Evaluation of Adsorption and Microcoulometric Methods for Determination of Halogenated Organic Compounds in Water

Description: Two adsorption/microcoulometric methods have been investigated for total organic halogen (TOX) in water. TOX, a proposed water-quality parameter, is a rapid, surrogate method to detect halides microcoulometrically and does not require compound identification before water quality can be judged. An XAD resin is used to concentrate organic halides that are eluted by a two-step, two-solvent procedure, followed by analysis using :chromatography or pyrolysis to convert organic halides to halide. In the granular activated carbon (GAC) method, the entire GAC-organic halide sample is pyrolyzed. TOX measurements of model compounds are comparable by both methods, but GAC was found to be superior to XAD for adsorption of chlorinated humics in drinking water and chlorinated lake water.
Date: May 1980
Creator: Kinstley, Warren O. (Warren Owen)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Final Administrative Changes to the Coastal Nonpoint Pollution Control Program Guidance for Section 6217 of the Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments of 1990 (CZARA)

Description: Final revisions by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding guidelines for coastal states to develop programs to reduce polluted runoff in accordance with the Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments of 1990 (CZARA). The text outlines administrative changes to the program including targeting, enforceable policies and mechanisms, timeframes, program implementation/evaluation, and resources. It also includes the transmittal letter, outlining the purpose.
Date: Summer 1998
Creator: United States. Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.
Item Type: Text
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department