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A Sound Basis for Interaction among Community Agencies

Description: The purpose of this study is (1) to determine the need for a creative program of interaction among the various community agencies, and (2) to determine the sound processes to be used in bringing about desirable social change through interaction among the agencies. Improving social conditions that affect the welfare of youth in the community is the primary concern of this study.
Date: 1951
Creator: King, Robert Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Evolution of Gentility in Eighteenth-Century England and Colonial Virginia

Description: This study analyzes the impact of eighteenth-century commercialization on the evolution of the English and southern American landed classes with regard to three genteel leadership qualities--education, vocation, and personal characteristics. A simultaneous comparison provides a clearer view of how each adapted, or failed to adapt, to the social and economic change of the period. The analysis demonstrates that the English gentry did not lose a class struggle with the commercial ranks as much as they were overwhelmed by economic changes they could not understand. The southern landed class established an economy based on production of cash crops and thus adapted better to a commercial economy. The work addresses the development of class-consciousness in England and the origins of Virginia's landed class.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Nitcholas, Mark C.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Is Modernization the Engine of Political Instability?: A Pooled Cross-Sectional Time-Series Test of Causality

Description: Traditional studies of the modernization-instability thesis have neglected the simultaneous influence of time and place on the relationship between modernization (social mobilization and political participation) and political instability, and the possible causal linkage between the two concepts. Empirical support for modernization-instability hypothesis will be obtained if and only if there is a strong positive correlation between modernization and political instability and the former causes the latter unidirectionally. Only then can one assert that modernization is exogenous, and that a policy geared toward restricting modernization is a proper anti-instability policy. This work attempts to address the question of correlation and causality through a pooled time-series cross-sectional data design and the use of Granger-causality tests. Particular attention is paid to the error structure of the models. Using pooled regression, a model of political instability is estimated for a total of 35 countries for the period 1960-1982. Granger tests are performed on twelve separate countries randomly selected from the 35. The results indicate that there is the expected positive relationship between modernization and political instability. Further, political institutionalization and economic well-being have strong negative influence on political instability. With regard to causality, the results vary by country. Some countries experience no causality between modernization and political instability, while some witness bidirectional causality. Further, some nations experience unidirectional causality running from modernization to political instability, while some depict a reverse causation. The main results suggest that modernization and political instability are positively related, and that political instability can have causal influence on modernization, just as modernization can exert causal influence on political instability.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Umezulike, Bedford Nwabueze
Partner: UNT Libraries

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Madeleine Fitzgerald

Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Madeleine Fitzgerald.
Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Fitzgerald, Madeleine
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Organizational adaptation to social change: Methodist churches in urban transitional areas

Description: This study is designed to examine churches in transitional areas of urban centers and how they adapt to social change. The research questions are: What modes of adaptation do churches select in response to social change? Why do churches when faced with social change select different modes of adaptation?
Date: December 1975
Creator: Vetter, Charles E.
Partner: UNT Libraries