Search Results

Technical Communication and the Needs of Small 501(c)(3) Organizations

Description: This exploratory study examines documentation practices and processes in ten small non-profit organizations. The objectives of this study were to answer the following two research questions: (1) What organizational needs do small non-profit organizations have that are relevant to technical communication? and (2) How are small 501(c)(3) organizations attempting to meet these needs? Which of these attempted solutions are ineffective? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two people from each organization: the executive director and a volunteer. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed, and grounded theory was used to identify coding categories related to documentation development. Primary findings suggest that interviewees are aware that they need documentation, yet they often postpone developing such documentation until problems develop. The study findings also suggest that interviewees across different nonprofit organizations value documentation for similar reasons. Strategies are provided for technical communicators interested in working with nonprofit organizations, and additional research avenues are identified.
Date: May 2006
Creator: Walton, Rebecca
Partner: UNT Libraries

Aging Well: The Impact of Service Learning on Elders

Description: Poster presented at the 2013 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas. This poster discusses research on the impact of service learning on elders. Innovative ways of enhancing the elderly's wellness have been introduced with research and services focusing on improving physical activity, nutrition, and increasing social interaction and involvement.
Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Davis, Katelyn M. & Smith, Kenneth Scott, 1976-
Partner: UNT Honors College

Building an Understanding of International Service Learning in Librarianship

Description: From the very beginning, library education has been a mixture of theory and practice. Dewey required apprenticeships to be part of the first library school at the University of Chicago as a method to indoctrinate new professional. Today, acculturation is incorporated into the professional education through a large variety of experiential learning techniques, including internships, practicum, field work, and service learning projects, all of which are designed to develop some level of professional skills within an information organization. But, what is done for understanding library culture? It is said that one cannot truly recognize the extent of one's own cultural assumptions, until they have experienced another. This study followed a group of LIS graduate students that took that next step – going to Russia. By employing a critical hermeneutic methodology, this study sought to understand what value students gain by from working on an assessment project in an international school library. Using a horizon analysis, the researcher established the worldview of participants prior to their departure, analyzed their experience through post-experience interviews, and constructed an understanding of value. Among other concepts, the researcher looked specifically to see whether "library cultural competency", understanding library culture in global context, was developed through working on a service learning project within an international school library. This dissertation provides feedback for the program leaders and ideas for future research.
Date: December 2016
Creator: Walczyk, Christine
Partner: UNT Libraries