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Adhesion/Diffusion Barrier Layers for Copper Integration: Carbon-Silicon Polymer Films and Tantalum Substrates

Description: The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has identified the integration of copper (Cu) with low-dielectric-constant (low-k) materials as a critical goal for future interconnect architectures. A fundamental understanding of the chemical interaction of Cu with various substrates, including diffusion barriers and adhesion promoters, is essential to achieve this goal. The objective of this research is to develop novel organic polymers as Cu/low-k interfacial layers and to investigate popular barrier candidates, such as clean and modified tantalum (Ta) substrates. Carbon-silicon (C-Si) polymeric films have been formed by electron beam bombardment or ultraviolet (UV) radiation of molecularly adsorbed vinyl silane precursors on metal substrates under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies show that polymerization is via the vinyl groups, while Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) results show that the polymerized films have compositions similar to the precursors. Films derived from vinyltrimethyl silane (VTMS) are adherent and stable on Ta substrates until 1100 K. Diffusion of deposited Cu overlayers is not observed below 800 K, with dewetting occurred only above 400 K. Hexafluorobenzene moieties can also be incorporated into the growing film with good thermal stability. Studies on the Ta substrates demonstrate that even sub-monolayer coverages of oxygen or carbide on polycrystalline Ta significantly degrade the strength of Cu/Ta chemical interactions, and affect the kinetics of Cu diffusion into bulk Ta. On clean Ta, monolayer coverages of Cu will de-wet only above 600 K. A partial monolayer of adsorbed oxygen (3L O2 at 300 K) results in a lowering of the de-wetting temperature to 500 K, while saturation oxygen coverage (10 L O2, 300 K) results in de-wetting at 300 K. Carbide formation also lowers the de-wetting temperature to 300 K. Diffusion of Cu into the Ta substrate at 1100 K occurs only after a 5-minute induction period. This induction period increases ...
Date: December 1999
Creator: Chen, Li
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Adaptive Linearization Method for a Constraint Satisfaction Problem in Semiconductor Device Design Optimization

Description: The device optimization is a very important element in semiconductor technology advancement. Its objective is to find a design point for a semiconductor device so that the optimized design goal meets all specified constraints. As in other engineering fields, a nonlinear optimizer is often used for design optimization. One major drawback of using a nonlinear optimizer is that it can only partially explore the design space and return a local optimal solution. This dissertation provides an adaptive optimization design methodology to allow the designer to explore the design space and obtain a globally optimal solution. One key element of our method is to quickly compute the set of all feasible solutions, also called the acceptability region. We described a polytope-based representation for the acceptability region and an adaptive linearization technique for device performance model approximation. These efficiency enhancements have enabled significant speed-up in estimating acceptability regions and allow acceptability regions to be estimated for a larger class of device design tasks. Our linearization technique also provides an efficient mechanism to guarantee the global accuracy of the computed acceptability region. To visualize the acceptability region, we study the orthogonal projection of high-dimensional convex polytopes and propose an output sensitive algorithm for projecting polytopes into two dimensions.
Date: May 1999
Creator: Chang, Chih-Hui, 1967-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Charge Collection Studies on Integrated Circuit Test Structures using Heavy-Ion Microbeams and MEDICI Simulation Calculations

Description: Ion induced charge collection dynamics within Integrated Circuits (ICs) is important due to the presence of ionizing radiation in the IC environment. As the charge signals defining data states are reduced by voltage and area scaling, the semiconductor device will naturally have a higher susceptibility to ionizing radiation induced effects. The ionizing radiation can lead to the undesired generation and migration of charge within an IC. This can alter, for example, the memory state of a bit, and thereby produce what is called a "soft" error, or Single Event Upset (SEU). Therefore, the response of ICs to natural radiation is of great concern for the reliability of future devices. Immunity to soft errors is listed as a requirement in the 1997 National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors prepared by the Semiconductor Industry Association in the United States. To design more robust devices, it is essential to create and test accurate models of induced charge collection and transport in semiconductor devices. A heavy ion microbeam produced by an accelerator is an ideal tool to study charge collection processes in ICs and to locate the weak nodes and structures for improvement through hardening design. In this dissertation, the Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) technique is utilized to simulate recoil effects of ions in ICs. These silicon or light ion recoils are usually produced by the elastic scattering or inelastic reactions between cosmic neutrons or protons and the lattice atoms in ICs. Specially designed test structures were experimentally studied, using microbeams produced at Sandia National Laboratories. A new technique, Diffusion Time Resolved IBICC, is first proposed in this work to measure the average arrival time of the diffused charge, which can be related to the first moment (or the average time) of the arrival carrier density at the junction. A 2D device simulation ...
Date: May 2000
Creator: Guo, Baonian
Partner: UNT Libraries

Work Function Study of Iridium Oxide and Molybdenum Using UPS and Simultaneous Fowler-Nordheim I-V Plots with Field Emission Energy Distributions

Description: The characterization of work functions and field emission stability for molybdenum and iridium oxide coatings was examined. Single emission tips and flat samples of molybdenum and iridium oxide were prepared for characterization. The flat samples were characterized using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to determine elemental composition, chemical shift, and crystal structure. Flat coatings of iridium oxide were also scanned by Atomic Force Microscopy to examine topography. Work functions were characterized by Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy from the flat samples and by Field Emission Electron Distributions from the field emission tips. Field emission characterization was conducted in a custom build analytical chamber capable of measuring Field Emission Electron Distribution and Fowler-Nordheim I-V plots simultaneously to independently evaluate geometric and work function changes. Scanning Electron Microscope pictures were taken of the emission tips before and after field emission characterization to confirm geometric changes. Measurement of emission stability and work functions were the emphasis of this research. In addition, use of iridium oxide coatings to enhance emission stability was evaluated. Molybdenum and iridium oxide, IrO2, were characterized and found to have a work function of 4.6 eV and 4.2 eV by both characterization techniques, with the molybdenum value in agreement with previous research. The analytic chamber used in the field emission analysis demonstrated the ability to independently determine the value and changes in work function and emitter geometry by simultaneous measurement of the Field Emission Energy Distribution and Fowler-Nordheim I-V plots from single emitters. Iridium oxide coating was found to enhance the stability of molybdenum emission tips with a relatively low work function of 4.2 eV and inhibited the formation of high work function molybdenum oxides. However, the method of deposition of iridium and annealing in oxygen to form iridium oxide on molybdenum emitters left rather severe cracking in the protective oxide ...
Date: August 1999
Creator: Bernhard, John Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

Optical Nonlinearities in Semiconductors for Limiting

Description: I have conducted detailed experimental and theoretical studies of the nonlinear optical properties of semiconductor materials useful for optical limiting. I have constructed optical limiters utilizing two-photon absorption along with photogenerated carrier defocusing as well as the bound electronic nonlinearity using the semiconducting material ZnSe. I have optimized the focusing geometry to achieve a large dynamic range while maintaining a low limiting energy for the device. The ZnSe monolithic optical limiter has achieved a limiting energy as low as 13 nJ (corresponding to 300W peak power) and a dynamic range as large as 105 at 532 nm using psec pulses. Theoretical analysis showed that the ZnSe device has a broad-band response covering the wavelength range from 550 nm to 800 nm. Moreover, I found that existing theoretical models (e.g. the Auston model and the band-resonant model using Boltzmann statistics) adequately describe the photo-generated carriers refractive nonlinearity in ZnSe. Material nonlinear optical parameters, such as the two-photon absorption coefficient β_2=5.5cm/GW, the refraction per unit carrier density σ_n=-0.8∗10^-21cm^3 and the bound electronic refraction n_2=-4∗10^-11esu, have been measured via time-integrated beam distortion experiments in the near field. A numerical code has been written to simulate the beam distortion in order to extract the previously mentioned material parameters. In addition, I have performed time-resolved distortion measurements that provide an intuitive picture of the carrier generation process via two-photon absorption. I also characterized the optical nonlinearities in a ZnSe Fabry-Perot thin film structure (an interference filter). I concluded that the nonlinear absorption alone in the thin film is insufficient to build an effective optical limiter, as it did not show a net change in refraction using psec pulses. An innovative numerical program was developed to simulate the nonlinear beam propagation inside the Fabry-Perot structure. For comparison, pump-probe experiments were performed using both thin film and ...
Date: May 1990
Creator: Wu, Yuan-Yen
Partner: UNT Libraries

Nonlinear Absorption Techniques and Measurements in Semiconductors

Description: We have conducted a detailed experimental and theoretical study of nonlinear absorption in semiconductors. Experimental measurements were made on a variety of materials at wavelengths of 1.06 and 0.53 microns using a picosecond Nd:YAG laser. Both two- and three-photon processes were investigated. Values of nonlinear absorption coefficients extracted from these measurements show excellent agreement with recent theory and scaling rules. Our theoretical investigation has been carried out for two-, three-,and n-photon absorption, for both continuous and pulsed sources. Expressions are obtained for the transmission of the sample in terms of the incident irradiance for each case. The physical interpretation of these results is discussed. We have also considered the effects of the photogenerated carriers on the measurements. Equations are developed that include linear absorption by these carriers. We have observed severe distortions on the transmitted beam, caused by changes in the refractive index of the material, due to the presence of these carriers. We present a model that accurately describes these effects in terms of the photogenerated carrier density. We have developed several novel techniques for monitoring nonlinear absorption. In particular, we have adapted the photoacoustic technique to the measurement of nonlinear absorption in semiconductors. We have also developed a technique employing irradiance modulation to greatly enhance the sensitivity to nonlinear processes and simultaneously discriminate against linear background signals. A related technique has been used to observe coherent mixing effects in semiconductors with cw, modelocked dye lasers.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Woodall, Milton Andrew
Partner: UNT Libraries

Analyses of Particulate Contaminants in Semiconductor Processing Fluids

Description: Particle contamination control is a critical issue for the semiconductor industry. In the near future, this industry will be concerned with the chemical identities of contaminant particles as small as 0.01 pm in size. Therefore, analytical techniques with both high chemical sensitivity and spatial resolution are required. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides excellent spatial resolution and yields structural and compositional information. It is rarely used, however, due to the difficulty of sample preparation. The goals of this research are to promote the use of TEM as an ultrafine particle analysis tool by developing new sample preparation methods, and to exploit the new TEM techniques for analysis of particles in semiconductor processing fluids. A TEM methodology for the analysis of particulate contaminants in fluids with an elemental detectability limit as low as 0.1 part per trillion (ppt), and a particle concentration detectability limit as low as 1 particle/ml for particles greater than 0.2 pm was developed and successfully applied to the analysis of particles in HF, H202, de-ionized (DI) water, and on the surface of an electronic device. HF samples from three manufacturers were examined. For HF (B), the maximum particle concentration was 8.3 x 103 particles/ml. Both a viscous material and lath-shaped particles were observed. The Sb concentration was less than 0.6 part per billion (ppb). HF (C) was the cleanest. CaF2 and TiO2 particles were identified in HF (D). For H2 02, iron and tin oxides and hydroxides were identified. The maximum particle concentration was 990 particles/ml. The Sn and Fe concentrations were less than 0.3 ppb. Spherical and dendritic particles were observed. For DI water, spherical and dendritic particles (<2 particles/ml), and particles containing Fe or Si with concentrations less than 0.1 ppt were observed. Contaminants on an electronic device surface were also analyzed. Clusters of small particles ...
Date: August 1998
Creator: Xu, Daxue
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Materials Approach to Silicon Wafer Level Contamination Issues from the Wet Clean Process

Description: Semiconductor devices are built using hyperpure silicon and very controlled levels of doping to create desired electrical properties. Contamination can alter these precisely controlled electrical properties that can render the device non-functional or unreliable. It is desirable to determine what impurities impact the device and control them. This study consists of four parts: a) determination of acceptable SCI (Standard Clean 1) bath contamination levels using VPD-DSE-GFAAS (Vapor Phase Decomposition Droplet Surface Etching Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy), b) copper deposition from various aqueous HF solutions, c) anion contamination from fluoropolymers used in chemical handling and d) metallic contamination from fluoropolymers and polyethylene used in chemical handling. A technique was developed for the determination of metals on a silicon wafer source at low levels. These levels were then correlated to contamination levels in a SCI bath. This correlation permits the determination of maximum permissible solution contaminant levels. Copper contamination is a concern for depositing on the wafer surface from hydrofluoric acid solutions. The relationship between copper concentration on the wafer surface and hydrofluoric acid concentration was determined. An inverse relationship exists and was explained by differences in diffusion rates between the differing copper species existing in aqueous hydrofluoric acid solutions. Finally, sources of contamination from materials used in chemical handling was studied. The predominant anion contamination from fluoropolymers was found to be fluorides. Metallic contamination from fluoropolymers and polyethylene was also studied. The primary metal contamination comes from the actual fabrication of the polymer and not from the polymer resin.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Hall, Lindsey H. (Lindsey Harrison)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Shubnikov-de Haas Effect Under Uniaxial Stress: A New Method for Determining Deformation Potentials and Band Structure Information in Semiconductors

Description: The problem with which this investigation is concerned is that of demonstrating the applicability of a particular theory and technique to two materials of different band structure, InSb and HgSe, and in doing so, determining the deformation potentials of these materials. The theory used in this investigation predicts an inversion-asymmetry splitting and an anisotropy of the Fermi surface under uniaxial stress. No previous studies have ever verified the existence of an anisotropy of the Fermi surface of semiconductors under stress. In this work evidence will be given which demonstrates this anisotropy. Although the inversion-asymmetry splitting parameter has been determined for some materials, no value has ever been reported for InSb. The methods presented in this paper allow a value of the splitting parameter to be determined for InSb.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Hathcox, Kyle Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Edmonds et al. Reply

Description: This article is a response to an article by M. Adell et al. [Phy. Rev. Lett. 94, 139701 (2005)] about semiconductor-based spintronics research.
Date: April 8, 2005
Creator: Edmonds, Kevin; Boguslawski, Piotr; Wang, K. Y.; Campion, Richard Paul; Novikov, Sergei; Farley, N. R. S. et al.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Quantum-Confined CdS Nanoparticles on DNA Templates

Description: As electronic devices became smaller, interest in quantum-confined semiconductor nanostructures increased. Self-assembled mesoscale semiconductor structures of II-VI nanocrystals are an especially exciting subject because of their controllable band gap and unique photophysical properties. Several preparative methods to synthesize and control the sizes of the individual nanocrystallites and the electronic and optical properties have been intensively studied. Fabrication of patterned nanostructures composed of quantum-confined nanoparticles is the next step toward practical applications. We have developed an innovative method to fabricate diverse nanostructures which relies on the size and a shape of a chosen deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) template.
Date: May 1998
Creator: Rho, Young Gyu
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Quantum Electron Dynamics in Periodic Superlattices under Electric Fields

Description: This thesis examines the quantum dynamics of electrons in periodic semiconductor superlattices in the presence of electric fields, especially uniform static fields. Chapter 1 is an introduction to this vast and active field of research, with an analysis and suggested solutions to the fundamental theoretical difficulties. Chapter 2 is a detailed historical review of relevant theories, and Chapter 3 is a historical review of experiments. Chapter 4 is devoted to the time-independent quantum mechanical study of the electric-field-induced changes in the transmission properties of ballistic electrons, using the transfer matrix method. In Chapter 5, a new time-dependent quantum mechanical model free from the fundamental theoretical difficulties is introduced, with its validity tested at various limiting cases. A simplified method for calculating field-free bands of various potential models is designed. In Chapter 6, the general features of "Shifting Periodicity", a distinctive feature of this new model, is discussed, and a "Bloch-Floquet Theorem" is rigorously proven. Numerical evidences for the existence of Wannier-Stark-Ladders are presented, and the conditions for its experimental observability is also discussed. In Chapter 7, an analytical solution is found for Bloch Oscillations and Wannier-Stark-Ladders at low electric fields. In Chapter 8, a new quantum mechanical interpretation for Bloch Oscillations and Wannier-Stark-Ladders is derived from the analytical result. The extension of this work to the cases of time-dependent electric fields is also discussed.
Date: May 1996
Creator: Yuan, Daiqing
Partner: UNT Libraries

Picosecond degenerate four-wave mixing in semiconductors

Description: This study reports on a variety of experimental and theoretical studies conducted in ZnSe, CdTe, and in semiconductor-doped glasses. The transient picosecond degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) experiments performed in these II-VI direct-gap semiconductors are part of our efforts to understand the picosecond dynamics of the free-carriers generated via two and three-photon absorption.
Date: May 1990
Creator: Canto, Edesly J.
Partner: UNT Libraries