Search Results

open access

Affirmative Action: Justice O'Connor's Opinions

Description: An examination of Justice O’Connor’s opinions reveals a gradual shift in perspective regarding the legal and constitutional standards to be applied in evaluating governmental affirmative action efforts, and the manner of their application in various legal and factual settings. This report briefly surveys decisions of retiring Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in affirmative action cases, an area where her opinions have frequently determined the outcome.
Date: July 19, 2005
Creator: Dale, Charles V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Property Rights "Takings": Justice O'Connor's Opinions

Description: When Justice O’Connor ascended to the Supreme Court, expectations were that she would adhere to the conservative line and generally uphold the property rights position over the government’s in Fifth Amendment “takings” cases. This did not happen. Instead, in this area as well as others, she established her place at the Court’s ideological center. To be sure, Justice O’Connor made many arguments favoring property owners, in both her opinions and her concurrences and dissents. But this asserted empathy for the property owner did not translate into espousal of bold doctrinal shifts in takings law. Rather she preferred an ad hoc case-by-case approach, as embodied in the Penn Central test for regulatory takings, whose current dominance she helped to establish. The remainder of the report reviews her takings-related writings for the Court.
Date: August 19, 2005
Creator: Meltz, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Pictures and signatures in Lazy B book]

Description: Photographs of two pages in the book "Lazy B" written by Sandra Day O'Connor and her brother H. Alan Day. On the first page is a photograph of Sue Pirtle, Kay Bailey Hutchison, and Lory Masters standing together. Their signatures are below the taped in picture and a note at the top reads "5/24/02 w/ Pitle; At the Grand Opening of "National Cowgirl Hall of Fame"". On the title page of the book is the autograph from the author Sandra Day O'Connor, along with another photograph of Sue Pitle, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Lory Masters.
Date: June 7, 2002
Creator: Gellner, Megan
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Affirmative Action: Justice O'Connor's Opinions

Description: This report briefly surveys decisions of retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor in affirmative action cases, an area where her opinions have frequently determined the outcome. An examination of Justice O'Connor's opinions reveals a gradual shift in perspective regarding the legal and constitutional standards to be applied in evaluating governmental affirmative action efforts, and the manner of their application in various legal and factual settings.
Date: July 19, 2005
Creator: Dale, Charles V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

[Clipping: "Falwell and the court", Dallas Times Herald]

Description: Clipping from an article in the Dallas Times Herald, dated Thursday, July 9, 1981. The article is an anonymous editorial or opinion piece opposing the Rev. Jerry Falwell's influence on the appointment of Supreme Court justices. The author specifically refers to Falwell's objection to President Reagan's nomination of Sandra Day O'Connor.
Date: July 9, 1981
Creator: Dallas Times Herald
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Supreme Court Appointment Process: President's Selection of a Nominee

Description: This report discusses the process for appointing Supreme Court Justices. Each appointment to the nine-member Court is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power that the Court exercises, separate from, and independent of, the executive and legislative branches.
Date: April 1, 2016
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Supreme Court Appointment Process: President's Selection of a Nominee

Description: This report discusses the process for appointing Supreme Court Justices. Each appointment to the nine-member Court is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power that the Court exercises, separate from, and independent of, the executive and legislative branches.
Date: June 27, 2018
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Supreme Court Appointment Process: President's Selection of a Nominee

Description: This report discusses the process for appointing Supreme Court Justices. Each appointment to the nine-member Court is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power that the Court exercises, separate from, and independent of, the executive and legislative branches.
Date: February 6, 2017
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Speed of Presidential and Senate Actions on Supreme Court Nominations, 1900-2010

Description: This report provides information on the amount of time taken to act on all Supreme Court nominations occurring between 1900 and 2010. It focuses on the actual amounts of time that Presidents and the Senate have taken to act after learning about vacancies, selections, etc. (as opposed to the elapsed time between official points in the process).
Date: April 21, 2010
Creator: Garrett, R. Sam & Rutkus, Denis Steven
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Roles of the President, Judiciary Committee, and Senate

Description: This report discusses the appointment of Supreme Court Justices, including the President's selection of a nominee and process to reach confirmation in the Senate. The appointment of a Supreme Court Justice is an event of major significance in American politics. Each appointment is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power the Supreme Court exercises as the highest appellate court in the federal judiciary. Appointments are usually infrequent, as a vacancy on the nine-member Court may occur only once or twice, or never at all, during a particular President's years in office. Under the Constitution, Justices on the Supreme Court receive lifetime appointments. Such job security in the government has been conferred solely on judges and, by constitutional design, helps insure the Court's independence from the President and Congress.
Date: September 3, 2010
Creator: Rutkus, Denis S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Consideration by the Senate Judiciary Committee

Description: This report discusses the role played by the Senate Judiciary Committee in the process for appointing Supreme Court Justices. Each appointment to the nine-member Court is of consequence because of the enormous judicial power that the Court exercises, separate from, and independent of, the executive and legislative branches.
Date: August 14, 2018
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Supreme Court Appointment Process: Senate Debate and Confirmation Vote

Description: This report provides information and analysis related to the final stage of the confirmation process for a nomination to the Supreme Court--the consideration of the nomination by the full Senate, including floor debate and the vote on whether to approve the nomination.
Date: September 7, 2018
Creator: McMillion, Barry J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Speed of Presidential and Senate Actions on Supreme Court Nominations, 1900-2010

Description: This report provides information on the amount of time taken to act on all Supreme Court nominations occurring between 1900 and the present. It focuses on the actual amounts of time that Presidents and the Senate have taken to act (as opposed to the elapsed time between official points in the process). This report focuses on when the Senate became aware of the President's selection (e.g., via a public announcement by the President).
Date: August 6, 2010
Creator: Garrett, R. S. & Rutkus, Denis S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Back to Top of Screen