79 Matching Results

Search Results

Mister Martini: Poems

Description: Spare yet evocative, the poems in Mister Martini pair explorations of a father-son relationship with haiku-like martini recipes. The martini becomes a daring metaphor for this relationship as it moves from the son’s childhood to the father’s death. Each poem is a strong drink in its own right, and together they form a potent narrative of alienation and love between a father and son struggling to communicate. “This is a truly original book. There’s nothing extra: sharp and clear and astonishing. Viva!” —Naomi Shihab Nye, judge and author of 19 Varieties of Gazelle
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: April 15, 2008
Creator: Carr, Richard
Partner: UNT Press

[Woman with Accompanying Poem]

Description: Photograph of a woman, standing in front of a house with a bucket and rope in her hands. This image is mounted to the right of a poem by Joe Clark, titled "My Sally Lives on the Mountain High."
Date: December 9, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Woman with Accompanying Poem]

Description: Photograph of a woman smiling at the camera while wearing a nose cover and a hat. This photograph is mounted to the right of a poem by Joe Clark, titled "Clotheses for Frozen Noses."
Date: December 13, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Sun Setting Behind the Hill]

Description: Photograph of the sun setting behind a hill. In this image a single road runs over the hilltop, with trees and telephone poles and a small house on either side of it. The photograph is mounted above an untitled poem by Joe Clark.
Date: 19uu
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem on Health]

Description: The author's health has returned. He mentions how fair the girls are, the members of church and how they hate each other. Brother Will was blaming Sister Sober because he didn't like her. On the flip side, he says that he has been there for a month, and he ate some bad wheat and then he got a fever. Afterwards he got better because his landlord took care of him. But he owes the doctor eight dollars. The author mentions hunting for deer to make new clothes: pants, a vest, and a coat. And with these clothes he will be able to handle any cold weather in Texas. He then goes to Paris and wants to meet up with Henry Moore and John. On the other side he mentions that he has gained weight and looks like a bear. His friend Browning's brother got a fever.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem, c.1899]

Description: Poem from the C. B. Moore Collection. The poem is about a cat. The writer describes their companion and how they feel when coming home to their feline friend.
Date: January 1899
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem]

Description: This is a document from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is an undated poem. The author is unidentified, but the handwriting appears to belong to Charles B. Moore. In this poem, the poet details his deep-seated affection for living in the prairie lands of Texas, but realizes he has given up much of his ties to family and friends because of his home in the country. He describes what he and his family would see as they traveled the prairie together; all the flora and fauna of the Texas pastureland.
Date: unknown
Creator: Moore, Charles B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Visitor

Description: Sheet music for "The Visitor," for tenor voice. The poem is written by Arthur Sampley and the music is by George Minter. The lyrics concern a dream wherein a man encounters the boy he once was - interested in freedom, truth, love, and fame instead of the heavenly.
Date: 1951
Creator: Sampley, Arthur & Minter, George
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

By What Lost Campfire

Description: Sheet music for "By What Lost Campfire," for mezzo soprano. The poem is written by Arthur Sampley and the music is by George Minter. The lyrics are "By what lost camp fire/ what lone height did deserts streching [sic] far, what/ comrades faces framed in light guide western star./ Up slopes I shall not/ climb again down trails the grasses hide, past/ camps where sleeping friends have lain too late to/ ride. to one dark peak a-/ gainst the sky on which the faint trail ends./ guide star and camp fire till I spy those fire lit friends."
Date: June 1948
Creator: Sampley, Arthur & Minter, George
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

I Shall Walk Proudly

Description: Sheet music for "I Shall Walk Proudly;" the poem was written by Arthur Sampley and the music is by Gerhardt Dorn. The lyrics say "I shall/ walk proudly through these lonely/ ways because I once walked proudly by your side/ not even death can rob me of the bride whose beauty/ made man love and woman praise. I wear with pride the/ splendor that you shed upon my days./ So walks a warrior's steed behind the pall and so the aide behind the/ nation's head and so the bridesmaid to the wedding strain,/ and so I walk, who, having lost my all,/ go with the valiant bearing of the dead and wear, like her, the/ smile above the pain."
Date: March 1955
Creator: Sampley, Arthur & Dorn, Gerhardt
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Life of Ben and Other Poems

Description: The Life of Ben and Other Poems consists of two sections. The first, The Life of Ben, is a series of seventeen poems about the life of a first-generation American and his family's immigration. The second section, Other Poems, includes twenty-one poems on a variety of themes.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Berecka, Alan Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Human Body is Not Designed for Ambivalence: Odes

Description: The critical analysis section of this dissertation seeks to define the ode using examples in translation from Greek and Latin odes and examples in English written from the 1500s to the 2000s. Although most definitions of the ode contend that this subgenre of the lyric is an occasional poem of praise that includes a meditative or mythological element, the ode is far more complex. An ode is an occasional poem, but it works to privilege rather than strictly praise its subject, allowing for the speaker's ambivalence toward the subject. Meditation is a key element of the ode, since the poet uses the subject as a means for moving to the meditation or as a conduit through which the meditation occurs. The meditation in the poem is also a way for the poet or speaker to negotiate the relationship between the subject and herself; thus, the ode is concerned with power, since the poet must place herself or the speaker in relation to the subject. Power thus may be granted to either the speaker or the subject; the poet names and speaks of the subject, and often the poet names and speaks of himself in relation to the subject. Additionally, odes usually contain some exhortation, generally directed to the subject if not to those surrounding the reader or capable of "listening in" to the performance of the poem. This definition, it should be noted, is intended to be fluid. In order for a poem to be relevant to its age, it must either adhere to or usefully challenge the contemporary concerns. Thus, while many of the odes discussed will contain the elements of this definition, others will work against the definition. In the remainder of the introduction, I examine ancient models and twentieth- and twenty-first century examples of the ode as ...
Date: December 2007
Creator: Walker, Tammy
Partner: UNT Libraries