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Risk, Courage, and Women Contemporary Voices in Prose and Poetry

Description: This unique collection of narratives, essays, and poems includes an original interview with Maya Angelou and pieces by Naomi Shihab Nye, Pat Mora, Rosemary Catacalos, and many others. Each work relates how women have demonstrated courage by taking a risk that has changed their lives. The Introduction explores courage not as a battlefield quality, but as the result of thoughtful choices demonstrating integrity and self-awareness. Each section opens with a description of its organization and the significance of individual pieces. Themes include sustenance for living, faith in the unknown, the courage of choice, the seams of our lives, and crossing borders. The book begins with a conversation with Dr. Maya Angelou, the embodiment of a courageous woman. She urges readers to "Envision" and concludes the book with the wish "Good morning," inviting all to join her in a new day reflecting "The Power of One." Voices of racial and ethnic diversity speak throughout the work, underscoring both difference and unity in the female experience. Including role models for university audiences and powerful reflections of life experiences for older readers, this work serves many purposes: a textbook in Literature or Women's/Gender Studies classes, a focus for book study groups, and a source for providing perspective during quiet moments. All net proceeds from book sales will go to the WINGS nonprofit organization, recipient of Oprah's Angel Network award, providing uninsured women with free breast cancer surgery, radiation, counseling, and follow-up treatments such as chemotherapy. "I wish women could see themselves free. Just see and imagine what they could do if they were free of the national and international history of diminishment. Just imagine, if we could have a Madame Curie born in the nineteenth century, suppose that twenty other women had been liberated at the same time? That's what I wish for ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: August 15, 2007
Creator: Waldron, Karen A.; Labatt, Laura M. & Brazil, Janice H.
Partner: UNT Press

The Naturalist

Description: The Naturalist is a collection of poems with a critical preface. In this preface, titled "'Death is the mother of beauty': The Contemporary Elegy and the Search for the Dead," I examine contemporary alterations and manifestations of the traditional genre of elegy. I explore the idea that the contemporary mourner is aware of the need to search for meaning despite living in a world without a centrally believed mythology. This search exposes the mourner's need to remain connected to the dead and, by proxy, to grace. I conclude that the contemporary elegy, through metaphorical figuration, personal memory, and traditional symbolism, simultaneously employs and denies the traditional elegiac conventions of apotheosis and resurrection by reconceiving them as methods not of achieving transcendence but of embracing desire with an acceptance of the inability to transcend. The poems of The Naturalist are a collection of elegies that reflect many of the ideas brought forth in the preface.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Harvell, Elizabeth A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Sky in Our Mouths

Description: I believe that poetry has survived for thousands of years because it provides people with a transpersonal connection that they can't find elsewhere. I look for poetry that is more than an emotional expression, more than witty word play, and more than an interesting observation. I want poetry to give me that inspirational spark, that glimpse into a world beyond my own. Poems that succeed in doing this force me into a perspective that I haven't previously imagined by yoking together two or more seemingly disparate elements. This tension between the old elements and the new link between them creates energy for the poem. This poetic nexus contributes to the transpersonal experience that I seek.
Date: August 2006
Creator: Tyler, William Aldon
Partner: UNT Libraries

Animals That Die

Description: The thesis has two parts. Part I is a critical essay entitled "Lessons Under the Amfalula." Part II is the collection of poems entitled "Animals That Die."
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2006
Creator: Campbell, Susan Maxwell
Partner: UNT Libraries

How to Factor Loss

Description: How to Factor Loss is a collection of poems and translations prefaced by a critical paper over Robert Hass's “Meditation at Lagunitas.” The preface, “A Sensuous Theory, A Sensuous Poem,” explores how Hass merges the discourses of theory and poetry to create a poem that hangs suspended between a confidence and an anxiety about language. The poems in this thesis are primarily responses to finitude. The first section turns toward an “other” as a strategy of placating desire and of reaching both inward and outward. The second section explores the potential failures of art as a means of touching objects. The final section acknowledges that finitude is the condition of humankind, and it turns toward a more tender language, one that embraces limitations and is filled with something like faith. The collection is followed by an appendix which contains translations of several poems by René Guy Cadou and Georg Trakl.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Hall, Todd R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Mister Martini: Poems

Description: Spare yet evocative, the poems in Mister Martini pair explorations of a father-son relationship with haiku-like martini recipes. The martini becomes a daring metaphor for this relationship as it moves from the son’s childhood to the father’s death. Each poem is a strong drink in its own right, and together they form a potent narrative of alienation and love between a father and son struggling to communicate. “This is a truly original book. There’s nothing extra: sharp and clear and astonishing. Viva!” —Naomi Shihab Nye, judge and author of 19 Varieties of Gazelle
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: April 15, 2008
Creator: Carr, Richard
Partner: UNT Press

[Woman with Accompanying Poem]

Description: Photograph of a woman, standing in front of a house with a bucket and rope in her hands. This image is mounted to the right of a poem by Joe Clark, titled "My Sally Lives on the Mountain High."
Date: December 9, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Elderly Man with Accompanying Poem]

Description: Photograph of an elderly man, hunched over in his chair. In this image the unidentified man is looking down, and chewing on something in his fingers. This image is mounted diagonally above a poem by Joe Clark, titled "Winter."
Date: November 2, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Woman with Accompanying Poem]

Description: Photograph of a woman smiling at the camera while wearing a nose cover and a hat. This photograph is mounted to the right of a poem by Joe Clark, titled "Clotheses for Frozen Noses."
Date: December 13, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Sun Setting Behind the Hill]

Description: Photograph of the sun setting behind a hill. In this image a single road runs over the hilltop, with trees and telephone poles and a small house on either side of it. The photograph is mounted above an untitled poem by Joe Clark.
Date: 19uu
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Country Boy with Accompanying Poem]

Description: Photograph of a young boy in a straw hat and overalls. In this image, the unidentified boy is digging at a small house set at the bottom of a hill. This image is set to the right of a poem by Joe Clark, titled "Country Boy."
Date: November 2, 1961
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem on Health]

Description: The author's health has returned. He mentions how fair the girls are, the members of church and how they hate each other. Brother Will was blaming Sister Sober because he didn't like her. On the flip side, he says that he has been there for a month, and he ate some bad wheat and then he got a fever. Afterwards he got better because his landlord took care of him. But he owes the doctor eight dollars. The author mentions hunting for deer to make new clothes: pants, a vest, and a coat. And with these clothes he will be able to handle any cold weather in Texas. He then goes to Paris and wants to meet up with Henry Moore and John. On the other side he mentions that he has gained weight and looks like a bear. His friend Browning's brother got a fever.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem, c.1899]

Description: Poem from the C. B. Moore Collection. The poem is about a cat. The writer describes their companion and how they feel when coming home to their feline friend.
Date: January 1899
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections