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Addition, Omission and Revision: the Stylistic Changes Made to Zehn Variationen über ein Präludium von Chopin by Ferruccio Busoni

Description: This study examines what Busoni meant by "formal deficiencies" when he described his 1884 version of Chopin Variations, and reveals that changes made to the 1884 version during its process of revision in 1922 correct the "formal deficiencies" and show a fundamental change in Busoni's compositional style and perception of musical motion. Including a detailed analysis of the modifications, omissions, and additions made to the 1922 version (including an examination of the Chopin Prelude in C minor, op. 28, No. 20 as a theme to reveal aspects of its construction used in the variation process), which shows how these changes affect the work's compositional structure.
Date: December 1994
Creator: Yoon, Soomee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ronald Stevenson's Passacaglia on DSCH: Understanding the Composer's Unique Approach to Large-Scaled Structure, a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of L.V. Beethoven, J. Brahms, F. Liszt, F. Mendelssohn, B. Bartók and Others

Description: This paper investigates Ronald Stevenson's unique treatment of large-scaled structure in his Passacaglia on D S C H. This piece's unusual eighty-minute length, use of traditional forms and unusual piano techniques, musical references to other cultures and a massive triple-fugue over a ground bass will be examined as they relate to its overall form. The elements of rhythm, melody/mode, harmony, counterpoint, piano techniques, and tonality are also used as means of highlighting many unifying elements of the piece which contribute to its overall cohesiveness. Tributes to other composers, among them Dimitry Shostakovich to whom the piece is dedicated, are discussed in addition to many references to world cultures and events which support Stevenson's views on what he terms world music. Rarely is a piece written that encompasses such a wide range of musical elements that possess the ability to engage an audience for an uninterrupted length of eighty-minutes. As of yet, an in-depth scholarly investigation of Stevenson's treatment of formal unity in this landmark piano work has not been done. This analysis reveals Stevenson's approach to composing in such a large form, as well as illustrating his mastery of variation, counterpoint and unending ingenuity for innovative piano techniques. The composer's background and philosophies are discussed as well as the major impact made on his compositional style by both Percy Grainger and Ferruccio Busoni.
Date: August 1994
Creator: Beckman, Bradley J. (Bradley John)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Aspects of a Late Style in Sergei Rachmaninoff's Variations on a Theme of Corelli, Op. 42: a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J. Brahms, L. v. Beethoven, F. Chopin, C. Debussy, Zoltan Kodaly, M. Moussorgsky, and S. Prokofiev

Description: This document identifies elements of a stylistic change which occurred in several of the pieces Rachmaninoff wrote during the last years of his life. These elements reflect a progressive trend in his music, which certainly maintained in spite of the change, its characteristic sound. The Variations on a Theme of Corelli, Op. 42 illustrate these new developments in their lean, angular unison sonorities, stripped of chordal padding and virtuosic display, in their percussive, staccato and incisive ostinato rhythmic figures, astringent chromatic harmony and modern air of detachment. The Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 confirms this stylistic development in its remarkable similarity to the Corelli Variations. In the last twenty-six years of his life in exile from his homeland, making his way around the world as a concert pianist, Rachmaninoff wrote only six major works. Perhaps his increasing age, separation from homeland, and the musical revolutions surrounding him in the Western world produced this stylistic development.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Ruttle, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Stylistic Evaluation of Charles Valentin Alkan's Piano Music: a Lecture Recital, together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Liszt, Schumann, and Villa-Lobos

Description: Charles Valentin Alkan (1813-1888), one of the great genii in music history, was widely misunderstood by his contemporaries because of his highly idiosyncratic ideas. From the perspective of the late twentieth century, his innovations can be better understood, and his music is now gaining wider appreciation. Yet, today many musicians still do not know even his name, much less his achievements. The year 1988 marks the one hundredth year since his death. In commemoration of this centennial anniversary, this thesis is presented as a plea for a greater awareness of the achievements of this important figure in the development of piano music.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Ahn, Joel, 1957-
Partner: UNT Libraries

Piano Music of Native Chinese Composers, with Particular Focus on the Piano Works Since 1950: a Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, L.v. Beethoven, S. Prokofiev, F. Chopin, R. Schumann, J. Brahms, M. Ravel, and A. Skryabin

Description: This documents aims at the identification of the sources of influence upon the styles of selected 20th century Chinese composers. Personal influences are reflected as well as those general influences specific to the different stylistic periods discussed. Most important, however, is the description of the methods by which these composers employ contemporary compositional devices to project musical gestures that are uniquely Chinese: elements of culture which are fundamentally programmatic and intimately related to the lives of the Chinese people. The introduction of Western music and musical instruments to China in the early 17th century and cultural exchanges with Japan served to gradually westernize the musical environment and training. The establishment of decidedly Western schools was accomplished at the beginning of this century, with the founding of Peking University and Shanghai National Conservatory. Music theory was taught, as well as history and composition, but with an emphasis on the practices of the 18th and 19th centuries. Compositions from this period reflect Western techniques from these eras, with some use of the pentatonic scale. In the 1930's, nationalism arose, a mirroring of the 19th-century European nationalistic trends. This philosophical conception has remained essentially unchanged to the present, as composers have aimed to utilize Western techniques to create artistic works and compositional styles which are uniquely Chinese. The musical works examined are limited to works for piano solo, as it is believed these are often more immediately revealing of compositional techniques and stylistic idioms.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Yang, Shu-mei
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of Chinese Folk and Instrumental Music on Tcherepnin's "Chinese mikrokosmos": A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W.A. Mozart, C. Debussy, S. Rachmaninoff, D. Shostakovich, and Others

Description: One of the most important compositional theories of Alexander Tcherepnin (1899-1977), Russian-American composer and pianist, is the Eurasian ideology, which was a result of the influence of Eastern culture. Inspired by this theory, Tcherepnin not only extricated himself from his own compositional techniques, but also intensified his search for musical folklore. In April, 1934, he began a world tour which was to include China, Japan, Singapore, the Philippines, Egypt, and Palestine, to search for "musical folklore." He became so fascinated with the culture of ancient China that he cancelled the rest of his arrangements, and, except for visits to Japan, he remained in China for three years, until the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in July, 1937. During his three-year stay in China, Tcherepnin was greatly attracted to Chinese culture, and as a result, Chinese culture influenced his music to a significant degree. This essay examines the manner in which Tcherepnin's music was influenced by his experiences in China. In order to precisely analyze the close affiliation between Chinese musical elements and Tcherepnin's "Chinese Mikrokosmos," many original Chinese sources proved indispensable in this study. These sources include Chinese folk music, theater music, instrumental music, religious music, and Chinese periodicals and newspapers that reported Tcherepnin's activities in China (1934-7). The organization of this dissertation as follows: Chapter I provides a brief biographical sketch of Tcherepnin, traces his activities in China, and introduces one of his greatest "Chinese" compositions, "Chinese Mikrokosmos," which represents the fruits of his labors to scrutinize and absorb Chinese musical language. Chapters II and III are devoted to exploring how Chinese folk and instrumental music inspired Tcherepnin's "Chinese Mikrokosmos." Chapter IV summarizes this study.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Luo, Yeou-Huey
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of the Transcription Techniques of Godowsky and Liszt as Exemplified in Their Transcriptions of Three Schubert Lieder

Description: This investigation sought to compare the transcription techniques of two pianist-composers, Godowsky and Liszt, using three Schubert lieder as examples. The lieder were "Das Wandern" from Die Schöne Müllerin, "Gute Nacht" from Winterreise, and "Liebesbotschaft" from Schwanengesang. They were compared using four criteria: tonality, counterpoint, timbral effects, and harmony. Liszt, following a practice common in the nineteenth century, was primarily concerned with bringing new music into the home of the domestic pianist. The piano transcription was the most widely used and successful medium for accomplishing this. Liszt also frequently transcribed pieces of a particular composer in order to promulgate them by featuring them in his recitals. The Schubert lieder fall into this category. Liszt did not drastically alter the original in these compositions. Indeed, in the cases of "Liebesbotschaft" and "Das Wandern," very little alteration beyond the incorporation of the melody into the piano accompaniment, occurs.Godowsky, in contrast, viewed the transcription as a vehicle for composing a new piece. He intended to improve upon the original by adding his own inspiration to it. Godowsky was particularly ingenious in adding counterpoint, often chromatic, to the original. Examples of Godowsky's use of counterpoint can be found in "Das Wandern" and "Gute Nacht." While Liszt strove to remain faithful to Schubert's intentions, Godowsky exercised his ingenuity at will, being only loosely concerned with the texture and atmosphere of the lieder. "Gute Nacht" and "Liebesbotschaft" are two examples that show how far afield Godowsky could stray from the original by the addition of chromatic voicing and counterpoint. Godowsky*s compositions can be viewed as perhaps the final statement on the possibilities of piano writing in the traditional sense. As such these works deserve to be investigated and performed.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Cloutier, David, 1948-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Stylistic Analysis of Charles Martin Loeffler's Deux Rapsodies for Oboe, Viola and Piano, L'étang and La cornemuse, After Poems by Maurice Rollinat: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works by E. Rubbra, D. Beaty, B. Britten, W.A. Mozart, and Others

Description: At the turn of this century, Charles Martin Loeffler (1861-1935) was considered to be among the finest of the handful of well-known American composers of the time. His music was often performed by major symphony orchestras, chamber groups and solo artists. Deux rapsodies for Oboe, Viola and Piano: L'Etang and La Cornemuse, after poems by Maurice Rollinat (1846-1903), show Loeffler's affinity for programmatic concepts. These works, completed in 1901, are revisions of settings of 1898 for low voice, clarinet, viola and piano, and are now, unfortunately, out of print; but the oboe, viola and piano setting has been published (originally as Deux rapsodies by G. Schirmer, 1905; the latest edition, Two Rhapsodies, is by McGinnis and Marx, N.Y., 1979) and recorded several times. Loeffler has reflected Rollinat's poetry in his settings by means of melodic, rhythmic and harmonic devices unique to his style. Formal and articulative devices also tend to point to his dependence on the poetry as a source of inspiration and as means for defining the final musical product. Indeed, the music seems incapable of existence independent of its source in the richly imagistic poetry of Rollinat.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Goodall, John W. (John Williams)
Partner: UNT Libraries

“In Old Mexico:” Suite for Solo Piano

Description: There is often difficulty in determining the most desirable medium to be used in the composition of music. After careful consideration, the writer chose the medium of piano to present the following musical composition. In the initial investigations, it appeared that the vocal idiom might provide a more suitable choice. However, piano teaching rather than work in the vocal field will probably consume a greater part of the writer's time in the future. The writing of a piano composition, then, appeared to be a justifiable decision.
Date: May 1947
Creator: Robinson, Frances O.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Stylistic Analysis of Béla Bartók's "Mikrokosmos"

Description: Bela Bartok's art is a perfect microcosm of the art of the twentieth century. It is interwoven with the musical conceptions and techniques of the great Western European masters, without in any way obscuring the individuality, the national consciousness, and the personal style and originality of the composer's own musical language -- a language rooted in the glorious tradition of his people. In the six volumes of the Mikrokosmos, or "little world," Bartok has presented a series of progressively difficult pieces designed -- if not intentionally, at least effectively -- to introduce to the piano student a technical approach to piano playing in the modern idiom. Admittedly, the etude does not cover every pianistic technical problem. It clearly shows that Bartok fully appreciates the worth of the great wealth of piano literature, and does not prescribe his method as a "cure-all" for the technical problems of piano playing.
Date: June 1942
Creator: Daniel, Ralph Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Stylistic Analysis of the Piano Works of Debussy and Ravel

Description: This study has three purposes: first, to point out the stylistic elements of music that are present in the piano works of Debussy and Ravel; second, to determine how the composers have used these elements; and third, to discover the effects that have been achieved through individual uses of the elements.
Date: May 1942
Creator: Jameson, Elizabeth Rose
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Stylistic Analysis of the Twenty-Four Piano Preludes by Dmitri Shostakovich

Description: The study of the twenty-four preludes of Shostakovitch [sic] has a three-fold significance. First, it deals with a body of music literature representing important aspects of twentieth-century music. Secondly, it is an original study since no detailed analysis of these preludes has been made. Very little has been written about this collection of short pieces, and no material is available along the line of a technical, scientific analysis. Thirdly, our subject deals with a collection of compositions written by one of the foremost living composers of today, not only of Russia, but of the entire musical world -- a man who is in the public eye at present, and in whose works the Soviet ideology is reflected.
Date: August 1945
Creator: Provence, Ethelston
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Critical Evaluation of Two-Piano Music Available in American Publication

Description: Th study of two-piano music was prompted by an active interest in that field and a recognized need for a knowledge of its literature on the part of the writer, who, for the past five years, has devoted most of her time to two-piano work. After careful investigation it becomes apparent that no other study similar to this has yet been made, and it is hoped that it may be helpful to others with interests in common. Much remains to be done and further study would prove profitable. More information might be gained from interviews with prominent duo-pianists, as well as from examination of foreign catalogues and of recital programs given in Carnegie Hall, Town Hall, and similar music centers.
Date: August 1945
Creator: Bridenthal, Dorothy
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Development of the Piano Solo Concerto from Its Beginning to the Twentieth Century, with a List of Published Concertos

Description: Every pianist at one time or another hopes to study and perform at least one piano concerto. In addition to the pleasure which will be derived from the study and performance, the student's musical growth will be greatly enhanced. In this survey and study of the general development of the piano solo concerto, the goal is to broaden the understanding of what the concerto is and what it means.
Date: August 1950
Creator: Hendrix, Jack W. (Jack Wheeler)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Characterstücke of Johannes Brahms

Description: With the advent of the Ballades, Intermezzi, Cappriccios and Rhapsodies of Johannes Brahms the musical world was to witness the apex of a development of a particular style of pianoforte composition which began in the nineteenth century with the publication in 1803 of a group of seven pieces called Bagatelles, opus 33 by Ludwig van Beethoven. This style thus originated was the Caracterstücke.
Date: August 1955
Creator: Guerry, Jack, 1931-
Partner: UNT Libraries